Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Reading the mind of God (without Hebrew lessons): Alston, shared attention, and mystical experience

  • ADAM GREEN (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

Alston's perceptual account of mystical experience fails to show how it is that the sort of predicates that are used to describe God in these experiences could be derived from perception, even though the ascription of matched predicates in the natural order are not derived in the manner Alston has in mind. In contrast, if one looks to research on shared attention between individuals as mediated by mirror neurons, then one can give a perceptual account of mystical experience which draws a tighter connection between what is reported in mystical reports and the most similar reports in the natural order.

Copyright
Corresponding author
e-mail: greenab@slu.edu
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Ursula Bellugi , Liz Lichtenberger , Wendy Jones , Zona Lai , & Marie St George (2000) ‘The neurocognitive profile of Williams Syndrome: a complex pattern of strengths and weaknesses’, Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12, Supplement, 7–29.

Ingar Brinck (2001) ‘Attention and the evolution of intentional communication’, Pragmatics & Cognition, 9, 259277.

Richard Gale (1994) ‘Why Alston's mystical doxastic practice is subjective’, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 54, 869875.

Vasudevi Reddy (2000) ‘Coyness in early infancy’, Developmental Science, 3, 186192.

Giacomo Rizzolatti , Leonardo Fogassi , & Vittorio Gallese (2006) ‘Mirrors in the mind’, Scientific American, 295, 5461.

Maxim Stamenov & Vittorio Gallese (eds) (2002) Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Brain and Language (Amsterdam: John Benjamins).

Helen Tager-Flusberg , Daniela Plesa Skwerer , & Robert M. Joseph (2006) ‘Model syndromes for investigating social cognitive and affective neuroscience: a comparison of autism and Williams syndrome’, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 1, 175182.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Religious Studies
  • ISSN: 0034-4125
  • EISSN: 1469-901X
  • URL: /core/journals/religious-studies
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×