Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-jk8t6 Total loading time: 0.288 Render date: 2022-07-07T10:38:00.530Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Popular Science Magazines in Interwar Britain: Authors and Readerships

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 July 2013

Peter J. Bowler*
Affiliation:
Queen's University, Belfast E-mail: p.bowler@qub.ac.uk

Argument

This article is based on a detailed survey of three British popular science magazines published during the interwar years. It focuses on the authors who wrote for the magazines, using the information to analyze the ways in which scientists and popular writers contributed to the dissemination of information about science and technology. It shows how the different readerships toward which the magazines were directed (serious or more popular) determined the proportion of trained scientists who provided material for publication. The most serious magazine, Discovery, featured almost exclusively material written by professional scientists, while the most popular, Armchair Science, favored writers who were not professional scientists, but who probably had some technical knowledge. Another magazine, Conquest, tried to provide a balance between authoritative and popular articles; however, it survived for only a few years.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anon. 1926. “Write for Modern Science.” Modern Science 7:399.Google Scholar
Anon. 1929. “‘Ourselves’: What We Are and What We Hope to Be.” Armchair Science 1:11.Google Scholar
Bloom, Ursula. 1959. He Lit the Lamp: A Biography of Professor A. M. Low. London: Burke.Google Scholar
Bowler, Peter. 2009. Science for All: The Popularization of Science in Early Twentieth-Century Britain. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Broks, Peter. 1996. Media Science before the Great War. London: Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Broks, Peter. 2006. Understanding Popular Science. Maidenhead UK: Open University Press.Google Scholar
Burnham, John C. 1987. How Superstition Won and Science Lost: Popularizing Science and Medicine in the United States. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
Cooter, Roger, and Pumphrey, Stephen. 1994. “Separate Spheres and Public Places: Reflections on the History of Science Popularization and on Science in Popular Culture.” History of Science 32:232–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hilgartner, Stephen. 1990. “The Dominant View of Popularization: Conceptual Problems, Political Uses.” Social Studies of Science 20:519–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
LaFollette, Marcel. 1990. Making Science Our Own: Public Images of Science, 1910–1955. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Morus, Iwan R. 1998. Frankenstein's Children: Electricity, Exhibition and Experiment in Early Nineteenth-Century London. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Shepstone, Harold J. 1931. Wild Beasts To-Day: Being an Account of the World's Leading Zoological Gardens, the Catching, Transportation and Doctoring of Wild Animals, the Rearing of them on Farms, and the Work of Conserving the Rarer Species in Parks and Reservations. London: Sampson, Low, Marston.Google Scholar
Snow, Charles Percy. 1940. “The End of Discovery.” Discovery, New Series 3:117118.Google Scholar
Wells, Herbert G., Huxley, Julian, and Wells, George P.. 1929–30. The Science of Life. 31 parts. London: Amalgamated Press. [Reprint 1931. London: Newnes.]Google Scholar
Whitley, Richard. 1985. “Knowledge Producers and Knowledge Acquirers: Popularization and a Relation between Scientific Fields and Their Publics.” In Expository Science: Forms and Functions of Popularization, edited by Shin, Terry and Whitley, Richard, 328. Dordrecht: D. Reidel.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Popular Science Magazines in Interwar Britain: Authors and Readerships
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Popular Science Magazines in Interwar Britain: Authors and Readerships
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Popular Science Magazines in Interwar Britain: Authors and Readerships
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *