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Involuntary treatment in the community: role of community treatment orders

  • Sarah Woolley (a1)
Summary

Although community treatment orders (CTOs) have been used internationally since the 1980s, they were only introduced into England and Wales in 2007 by amendments to the 1983 Mental Health Act. Aimed to replace the common use of extended Section 17 leave to enforce community treatment, CTOs are believed to offer patients more protection owing to stringent criteria for their use. Literature reviews, however, do not demonstrate any evidence favouring the use of CTOs and in this age of evidence-based medicine it is questionable whether psychiatrists will change from a familiar practice to an unproven one.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Sarah Woolley (davidandsarahsmith@btinternet.com)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Involuntary treatment in the community: role of community treatment orders

  • Sarah Woolley (a1)
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