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Impact of Off-Site Deposition of Glufosinate to Non-Clearfield Rice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Eric P. Webster
Affiliation:
School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Sciences, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 104 Sturgis Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Justin B. Hensley
Affiliation:
School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Sciences, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 104 Sturgis Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
David C. Blouin
Affiliation:
Department of Experimental Statistics, Louisiana State University, 45 Agricultural Administration Building, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Dustin L. Harrell
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University Agricultural Center Rice Research Station, 1373 Caffey Road, Rayne, LA 70578
Jason A. Bond
Affiliation:
Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Stoneville, MS
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Field studies were conducted near Crowley, LA to evaluate the effects of simulated herbicide drift on ‘Cocodrie' rice. Each treatment was made with the spray volume varying proportionally to herbicide dosage based on a spray volume of 234 L ha−1 and a glufosinate rate of 493 g ai ha−1. The 6.3%, 31 g ha−1, herbicide rate was applied at a spray volume of 15 L ha−1 and the 12.5%, 62 g ha−1, herbicide rate was applied at a spray volume of 29 L ha−1. Glufosinate applied at one-tiller, panicle differentiation (PD) growth stage, and boot resulted in crop injury at 7 and 14 d after treatment. At 21 and 28 d after treatment, crop injury was still evident but was less than 10%. Glufosinate applied at one-tiller resulted in plant height reductions of 4 to 6%; however, at harvest, height reductions were 1% or less. Glufosinate applied to rice in the boot stage had lower rice yield in the primary crop, but no difference was observed in the ratoon crop. Harvested seed from the primary crop germinated 7 to 11% less than the nontreated when rice was treated with 31 and 62 g ha−1 of glufosinate. Seedling vigor was reduced when treated with 31 and 62 g ha−1 of glufosinate.

Se realizaron estudios de campo cerca de Crowley, Louisiana, para evaluar los efectos de la deriva simulada de herbicida sobre el arroz 'Cocodrie'. Cada tratamiento fue realizado con un volumen de aspersión que varió en forma proporcional a la dosis del herbicida, basándose en un volumen de aplicación de 234 L ha−1 y una dosis de glufosinate de 493 g ai ha−1. La dosis de herbicida de 6.3%, 31 g ha−1, fue realizada a con un volumen de 15 L ha−1 y la de 12.5%, 62 g ha−1, se hizo con un volumen de aspersión de 29 L ha−1. Cuando se aplicó glufosinate en el estadio de desarrollo de un hijuelo, diferenciación de panícula (PD), o en el de engrosamiento del tallo floral, el cultivo sufrió daño, 7 y 14 d después del tratamiento. A 21 y 28 d después del tratamiento, el daño del cultivo era todavía evidente, pero era menor a 10%. Glufosinate aplicado en el estadio de un hijuelo resultó en reducciones en altura de planta de 4 a 6%. Sin embargo, en la cosecha, las reducciones en altura fueron de 1% o menores. El glufosinate aplicado a arroz en el estadio de engrosamiento del tallo floral tuvo un menor rendimiento en el cultivo primario, pero no se observaron diferencias en el cultivo de la soca. La semilla cosechada del cultivo primario germinó 7 a 11% menos que el testigo sin tratamiento cuando el arroz fue tratado con 31 y 62 g ha−1 de glufosinate. El vigor de la plántula se redujo con los tratamientos de 31 y 62 g ha−1 de glufosinate.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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