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  • Print publication year: 2015
  • Online publication date: May 2015

16 - Religious change in East Asia

from Part Three - Religion and Religious Change
Summary
In 1636, the Dutch East India Company official, Joost Schouten sat down to pen an account of the kingdom of Ayutthaya, or Siam. He described what he saw as an exotic and utterly unfamiliar legal system, characterized by despotic excesses and unfathomable customs. This chapter outlines an approach on Alexandrowicz's insights about the emergence of a comprehensive law of nations and that recognizes the importance of empires to the international order without defining non-European law and sovereignty as problems that Western jurists and international lawyers had to solve. As with protocol and jurisdiction, the long nineteenth century brought important shifts in the way protection functioned internationally. A quality of imprecision in such basic understandings could provide valuable flexibility and prevent conflict. It sometimes also sharpened conflict by introducing new jurisdictional tensions, creating opportunities for flawed performances of protocol, or exposing the fictions embedded within offers of protection.
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The Cambridge World History
  • Online ISBN: 9781139022460
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139022460
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Ben-Dor Benite, Zvi, The Dao of Muhammad: A Cultural History of Muslims in Late Imperial China (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center and Harvard University Press, 2005).
Berling, Judith, “Taoism in Ming Culture,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 953–86.
Brook, Timothy, “The Politics of Religion: Late-Imperial Origins of the Regulatory State,” in Yoshiko, Ashiwa and Wank, David L. (eds.), Making Religion, Making the State: The Politics of Religion in Modern China (Stanford University Press, 2009), pp. 2242.
De Bruyn, Pierre-Henry, “Daoism in the Ming, 1368–1644,” in Kohn, Livia (ed.), Daoism Handbook (Leiden: Brill, 2000), pp. 594622.
Esposito, Monica, “Daoism in the Qing, 1644–1911,” in Kohn, Livia (ed.), Daoism Handbook (Leiden: Brill, 2000), pp. 623–58.
Frankel, James D., “Chinese Islam,” in Nadeau, Randall Laird (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese Religions (Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp. 237–60.
Goossaert, Vincent, “Taoism, 1644–1850,” in The Cambridge History of China, Vol. IX, Part 2. The Ch'ing Empire to 1800, forthcoming.
Goossaert, Vincent, and Palmer, David, The Religious Question in Modern China (University of Chicago Press, 2011).
Menegon, Eugenio, Ancestors, Virgins, & Friars: Christianity as a Local Religion in Late Imperial China (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center and Harvard University Press, 2009).
Meulenbeld, Mark, “Chinese Religion in the Ming and Qing Dynasties,” in Nadeau, Randall Laird (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese Religions (Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp. 125–44.
Overmyer, Daniel, Folk Buddhist Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1976).
Peterson, Willard, “Learning from Heaven: The Introduction of Christianity and Other Western Ideas into Late Ming China,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 789839.
Seiwert, Hubert (in collaboration with Ma Xisha), Popular Religious Movements and Heterodox Sects in Chinese History (Leiden: Brill, 2003).
Standaert, Nicolas (ed.), Handbook of Christianity in China. Volume One: 635–1800 (Leiden: Brill, 2001).
Taylor, Romeyn, “Official Religion in the Ming,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 840–92.
, Chün-fang, “Ming Buddhism,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 899952.
Buswell, Robert E. Jr., and Lee, Timothy S. (eds.), Christianity in Korea (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2006).
Debary, William Theodore, and Haboush, JaHyun Kim (eds.), The Rise of Neo-Confucianism in Korea (New York: Columbia University Press, 1985).
Deuchler, Martina, The Confucian Transformation of Korea: A Study of Society and Ideology (Cambridge, MA: Council on East Asian Studies Harvard University, 1992).
Haboush, JaHyun Kim, and Deuchler, Martina (eds.), Culture and the State in Late Chosŏn Korea (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 1999).
Jung, Ji-Young, “Buddhist Nuns and Alternative Space in Confucian Chosŏn Society,” in Cho, Eun-Su and Buswell, Robert (eds.), Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2011), pp. 147–64.
Lancaster, Lewis R., and Yu, Chai-shin (eds.), Buddhism in the Early Chŏson: Suppression and Transformation, Korea Research Monograph 23 (Berkeley, CA: Institute of East Asian Studies University of California at Berkeley, 1996).
Nam, Hee-sook, “Publication of Buddhist Literary Texts: The Publication and Popularization of Mantra Collections and Buddhist Ritual Texts in the Late Chosŏn Dynasty,” trans. Inga Diederich, Journal of Korean Religions 3.1 (2012): 927.
Walraven, Boudewijn, “Religion and the City: Seoul in the Nineteenth Century,” The Review of Korean Studies 3 (2000): 178206.
Ambros, Barbara, Emplacing a Pilgrimage: The Ōyama Cult and Regional Religion in Early Modern Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2008).
Bodiford, William M., Sōtō Zen in Medieval Japan (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993).
Cogan, Gina, The Princess Nun: Bunchi, Buddhist Reform, and Gender in Early Edo Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2014).
Grapard, Alan G., “The Shinto of Yoshida Kanetomo,” Monumenta Nipponica 47.1 (1992): 2758.
Hur, Nam-Lin, Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity and the Danka System (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).
Nosco, Peter, Remembering Paradise: Nostalgia and Nativism in Eighteenth-Century Japan (Cambridge, MA: Council on East Asian Studies Harvard University, 1990).
Ooms, Herman, Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs, 1570–1680 (Ann Arbor, MI: Center for Japanese Studies, the University of Michigan, 1985).
Paramore, Kiri, Ideology and Christianity in Japan (London: Routledge, 2009).
Sawada, Janine Anderson, Confucian Values and Popular Zen: Sekimon Shingaku in Eighteenth-Century Japan (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993).
Tsang, Carol Richmond, War and Faith: Ikkō Ikki in Muromachi Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).
Ben-Dor Benite, Zvi, The Dao of Muhammad: A Cultural History of Muslims in Late Imperial China (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center and Harvard University Press, 2005).
Berling, Judith, “Taoism in Ming Culture,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 953–86.
Brook, Timothy, “The Politics of Religion: Late-Imperial Origins of the Regulatory State,” in Yoshiko, Ashiwa and Wank, David L. (eds.), Making Religion, Making the State: The Politics of Religion in Modern China (Stanford University Press, 2009), pp. 2242.
De Bruyn, Pierre-Henry, “Daoism in the Ming, 1368–1644,” in Kohn, Livia (ed.), Daoism Handbook (Leiden: Brill, 2000), pp. 594622.
Esposito, Monica, “Daoism in the Qing, 1644–1911,” in Kohn, Livia (ed.), Daoism Handbook (Leiden: Brill, 2000), pp. 623–58.
Frankel, James D., “Chinese Islam,” in Nadeau, Randall Laird (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese Religions (Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp. 237–60.
Goossaert, Vincent, “Taoism, 1644–1850,” in The Cambridge History of China, Vol. IX, Part 2. The Ch'ing Empire to 1800, forthcoming.
Goossaert, Vincent, and Palmer, David, The Religious Question in Modern China (University of Chicago Press, 2011).
Menegon, Eugenio, Ancestors, Virgins, & Friars: Christianity as a Local Religion in Late Imperial China (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center and Harvard University Press, 2009).
Meulenbeld, Mark, “Chinese Religion in the Ming and Qing Dynasties,” in Nadeau, Randall Laird (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese Religions (Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp. 125–44.
Overmyer, Daniel, Folk Buddhist Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1976).
Peterson, Willard, “Learning from Heaven: The Introduction of Christianity and Other Western Ideas into Late Ming China,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 789839.
Seiwert, Hubert (in collaboration with Ma Xisha), Popular Religious Movements and Heterodox Sects in Chinese History (Leiden: Brill, 2003).
Standaert, Nicolas (ed.), Handbook of Christianity in China. Volume One: 635–1800 (Leiden: Brill, 2001).
Taylor, Romeyn, “Official Religion in the Ming,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 840–92.
, Chün-fang, “Ming Buddhism,” in Twitchett, Denis C. and Mote, Frederick W. (eds.), The Cambridge History of China, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, vol. viii, Part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 899952.
Buswell, Robert E. Jr., and Lee, Timothy S. (eds.), Christianity in Korea (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2006).
Debary, William Theodore, and Haboush, JaHyun Kim (eds.), The Rise of Neo-Confucianism in Korea (New York: Columbia University Press, 1985).
Deuchler, Martina, The Confucian Transformation of Korea: A Study of Society and Ideology (Cambridge, MA: Council on East Asian Studies Harvard University, 1992).
Haboush, JaHyun Kim, and Deuchler, Martina (eds.), Culture and the State in Late Chosŏn Korea (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 1999).
Jung, Ji-Young, “Buddhist Nuns and Alternative Space in Confucian Chosŏn Society,” in Cho, Eun-Su and Buswell, Robert (eds.), Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2011), pp. 147–64.
Lancaster, Lewis R., and Yu, Chai-shin (eds.), Buddhism in the Early Chŏson: Suppression and Transformation, Korea Research Monograph 23 (Berkeley, CA: Institute of East Asian Studies University of California at Berkeley, 1996).
Nam, Hee-sook, “Publication of Buddhist Literary Texts: The Publication and Popularization of Mantra Collections and Buddhist Ritual Texts in the Late Chosŏn Dynasty,” trans. Inga Diederich, Journal of Korean Religions 3.1 (2012): 927.
Walraven, Boudewijn, “Religion and the City: Seoul in the Nineteenth Century,” The Review of Korean Studies 3 (2000): 178206.
Ambros, Barbara, Emplacing a Pilgrimage: The Ōyama Cult and Regional Religion in Early Modern Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2008).
Bodiford, William M., Sōtō Zen in Medieval Japan (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993).
Cogan, Gina, The Princess Nun: Bunchi, Buddhist Reform, and Gender in Early Edo Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2014).
Grapard, Alan G., “The Shinto of Yoshida Kanetomo,” Monumenta Nipponica 47.1 (1992): 2758.
Hur, Nam-Lin, Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity and the Danka System (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).
Nosco, Peter, Remembering Paradise: Nostalgia and Nativism in Eighteenth-Century Japan (Cambridge, MA: Council on East Asian Studies Harvard University, 1990).
Ooms, Herman, Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs, 1570–1680 (Ann Arbor, MI: Center for Japanese Studies, the University of Michigan, 1985).
Paramore, Kiri, Ideology and Christianity in Japan (London: Routledge, 2009).
Sawada, Janine Anderson, Confucian Values and Popular Zen: Sekimon Shingaku in Eighteenth-Century Japan (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993).
Tsang, Carol Richmond, War and Faith: Ikkō Ikki in Muromachi Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).