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A History of Christianity in India
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  • Cited by 18
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Doss, M. Christhu 2018. Indian Christians and The Making of Composite Culture in South India. South Asia Research, Vol. 38, Issue. 3, p. 247.

    Zami, Tahmidal and Lorea, Carola Erika 2016. Interreligious Encounter and Proselytism in Pre-Mughal Bengal. Indian Historical Review, Vol. 43, Issue. 2, p. 234.

    Mallampalli, Chandra 2016. The Wiley Blackwell Companion to World Christianity. p. 535.

    Corveleyn, Jozef Dezutter, Jessie and Thurackal, Jobi Thomas 2016. Spiritual Development and Gratitude Among Indian Emerging Adults. Archive for the Psychology of Religion, Vol. 38, Issue. 1, p. 72.

    Winterbottom, Anna 2016. Hybrid Knowledge in the Early East India Company World. p. 54.

    Rao, Hayagreeva and Dutta, Sunasir 2012. Free Spaces as Organizational Weapons of the Weak. Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 57, Issue. 4, p. 625.

    Childers, J. W. 2011. The Encyclopedia of Christian Civilization.

    Thomas, Tenny Carveley, Kenneth Hovorun, Cyril Sandu, Dan Trostyanskiy, Sergey McGuckin, John A. Gavrilkin, Konstantin McDowell, Maria Gwyn Tsironis, Niki J. White, Monica M. Shevzov, Vera Kenworthy, Scott M. Thomas, Tenny Epsen, Edward and Conomos, Dimitri 2011. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Orthodox Christianity. p. 376.

    Schirrmacher, Thomas 2011. The Encyclopedia of Christian Civilization.

    Young, Richard Fox 2011. World Christian Historiography, Theological ‘Enthusiasms’, and the Writing of R. E. Frykenberg’s Christianity in India. Religion Compass, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, p. 71.

    2010. Robinson Crusoe tries again. p. 74.

    McGrath, James F. 2008. History and Fiction in the Acts of Thomas: The State of the Question. Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha, Vol. 17, Issue. 4, p. 297.

    Sivasundaram, Sujit 2007. ‘A Christian Benares’. The Indian Economic & Social History Review, Vol. 44, Issue. 2, p. 111.

    Michel, Tom 2003. Implications of the Islamic revival for Christian‐Muslim dialogue in Asia. International journal for the Study of the Christian Church, Vol. 3, Issue. 2, p. 58.

    Dempsey, Corinne 1998. St. George the Indigenous Foreigner in Kerala Christianity. Religion, Vol. 28, Issue. 2, p. 171.

    Neff, D.S. 1997. Hostages to Empire: The Anglo-Indian Problem in Frankenstein, The Curse of Kehama, and The Missionary. European Romantic Review, Vol. 8, Issue. 4, p. 386.

    Thapar, Romila 1992. Black gold: South Asia and the roman maritime trade. South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, Vol. 15, Issue. 2, p. 1.

    Killingley, Dermot 1991. The Study of South Asian Religion in the 1980s. South Asia Research, Vol. 11, Issue. 1, p. 1.

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Book description

Christians form the third largest religious community in India. How has this come about? There are many studies of separate groups: but there has so far been no major history of the three large groups - Roman Catholic, Protestant and Thomas Christians (Syrians). This work attempts to meet the need for such a history. It goes right back to the beginning and traces the story through the ups and downs of at least fifteen centuries. It includes careful studies of the political and social background and of the non-Christian reactions to the Christian message. The narration is non-technical and should present few difficulties to the thoughtful reader; the more technical matters are dealt with in notes and appendices. This book will be of interest to all students of Church History and will also prove fascinating to many who are concerned with the development of Christianity as a world religion and in the dialogue between different forms of faith.

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