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Must We Mean What We Say?
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  • Cited by 26
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Santiáñez, Nil 2018. On literary bullshit: discursive wrongdoing and modernity in Fray Gerundio de Campazas. Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Vol. 19, Issue. 2, p. 161.

    López, Roger G. 2017. The heteronomous moral value of shame. South African Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 36, Issue. 3, p. 393.

    Whiting, Daniel 2016. What is the Normativity of Meaning?. Inquiry, Vol. 59, Issue. 3, p. 219.

    Zundel, Mike Holt, Robin and Popp, Andrew 2016. Using history in the creation of organizational identity. Management & Organizational History, Vol. 11, Issue. 2, p. 211.

    Rugo, Daniele 2015. The Patience of Film. Angelaki, Vol. 20, Issue. 4, p. 23.

    Johansson, Viktor 2015. Questions from the Rough Ground: Teaching, Autobiography and the Cosmopolitan “I”. Studies in Philosophy and Education, Vol. 34, Issue. 5, p. 441.

    Bardzell, Jeffrey and Bardzell, Shaowen 2015. Humanistic HCI. Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics, Vol. 8, Issue. 4, p. 1.

    Frank, Jeff 2014. James Baldwin’s ‘Everybody’s Protest Novel’: Educating our responses to racism. Educational Philosophy and Theory, Vol. 46, Issue. 1, p. 24.

    Steuer, Daniel 2014. A Concise Companion to Psychoanalysis, Literature, and Culture. p. 82.

    Wellbery, David E. and Dutt, Carsten 2014. SED CONTRA. The German Quarterly, Vol. 87, Issue. 3, p. 257.

    Abrioux, Yves 2014. Human Without Qualities. European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 18, Issue. 2, p. 135.

    Scruton, Roger 2013. Our Love for Animals. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, Vol. 10, Issue. 4, p. 479.

    Plotica, Luke Philip 2013. “This Is Simply What I Do”: Wittgenstein and Oakeshott on the Practices of Individual Agency. The Review of Politics, Vol. 75, Issue. 01, p. 45.

    Pin-Fat, Véronique 2013. Cosmopolitanism and the End of Humanity: A Grammatical Reading of Posthumanism. International Political Sociology, Vol. 7, Issue. 3, p. 241.

    Miller, Andrew H. 2013. A Companion to George Eliot. p. 153.

    Kindi, Vasso 2013. The Structure’s Legacy: Not from Philosophy to Description. Topoi, Vol. 32, Issue. 1, p. 81.

    Frank, Jeff 2013. The Claims of Documentary: Expanding the educational significance of documentary film. Educational Philosophy and Theory, Vol. 45, Issue. 10, p. 1018.

    Hext, Kate 2012. Literary Form and Philosophical Thought in Nineteenth-Century Britain. Literature Compass, Vol. 9, Issue. 11, p. 695.

    ISAAC, JOEL 2012. KUHN'S EDUCATION: WITTGENSTEIN, PEDAGOGY, AND THE ROAD TO STRUCTURE. Modern Intellectual History, Vol. 9, Issue. 01, p. 89.

    FRANK, JEFF 2012. Imagining Wittgenstein's Adolescent: The educational significance of expression. Educational Philosophy and Theory, Vol. 44, Issue. 4, p. 343.

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    Must We Mean What We Say?
    • Online ISBN: 9780511811753
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511811753
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Book description

Reissued with an additional preface to sit alongside the volume on Stanley Cavell in Contemporary Philosophy in Focus this famous collection of essays covers a remarkably wide range of philosophical issues (there are essays on Wittgenstein, Austin, Kierkegaard, and the philosophy of language) and extends beyond philosophy into discussions of music and drama.

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