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The Abolition of the Brazilian Slave Trade
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  • Cited by 9
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    Mohs Gage, Kelly 2016. Moda da Bahia: An Analysis of Contemporary Vendor Dress in Salvador. Fashion Theory, Vol. 20, Issue. 2, p. 153.


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    Gough, Barry 2014. Pax Britannica.


    Lago, Enrico Dal 2013. The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration.


    Chalhoub, Sidney 2011. The Precariousness of Freedom in a Slave Society (Brazil in the Nineteenth Century). International Review of Social History, Vol. 56, Issue. 03, p. 405.


    Domingues da Silva, Daniel B. 2008. The Atlantic Slave Trade to Maranhão, 1680–1846: Volume, Routes and Organisation. Slavery & Abolition, Vol. 29, Issue. 4, p. 477.


    Adderley, Rosanne Marion 1999. ‘A most useful and valuable people?’ cultural, moral and practical dilemmas in the use of liberated African labour in the Nineteenth‐century Caribbean. Slavery & Abolition, Vol. 20, Issue. 1, p. 59.


    Klein, Martin A. 1994. Slavery, the international labour market and the emancipation of slaves in the nineteenth century. Slavery & Abolition, Vol. 15, Issue. 2, p. 197.


    Clarence‐Smith, W. G. 1979. The myth of uneconomic imperialism: the Portuguese in Angola, 1836–1926. Journal of Southern African Studies, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, p. 165.


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    The Abolition of the Brazilian Slave Trade
    • Online ISBN: 9780511759734
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511759734
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Book description

When at the beginning of the nineteenth century Britain launched her crusade against the transatlantic slave trade, Brazil was one of the greatest importers of African slaves in the New World. Negro slavery had been the cornerstone of the Brazilian economy and of Brazilian society for over 200 years and the slave population of Brazil required regular replenishment through the trade. In this detailed study Dr Bethell explains how during the period of Brazilian independence from Portugal, Britain forced the Brazilian slave trade to be declared illegal, why it proved impossible to suppress it for twenty years afterwards and how it was finally abolished. He covers a major aspect of the history of the international abolition of the slave trade and slavery and makes an important contribution to the study of Anglo-Brazilian relations which were dominated - and damaged - by the slave trade question for more than half a century.

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