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  • ISSN: 0267-1905 (Print), 1471-6356 (Online)
  • Editor: Alison Mackey Georgetown University
  • Editorial board
The Annual Review of Applied Linguistics publishes research on key topics in the broad field of applied linguistics. Each issue is thematic, providing a variety of perspectives on the topic through research summaries, critical overviews, position papers and empirical studies. Being responsive to the field, some issues are tied to the theme of that year's annual conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics. Also, at regular intervals an issue will take the approach of covering applied linguistics as a field more broadly, including coverage of critical or controversial topics. ARAL provides cutting-edge and timely articles on a wide number of areas, including language learning and pedagogy, second language acquisition, sociolinguistics, language policy and planning, language assessment, and research design and methodology, to name just a few.

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Other applied linguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit?
  • 19 July 2018, Katie
  • Blog post written by Gordana Lalic-Krstin and Nadezda Silaski, authors of the article ‘From Brexit to Bregret: An account of some Brexit-induced neologisms What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit? Judging by the material we collected from news media (broadcast and online), Facebook and Twitter, blogs and internet forums, the event  has generated a myriad of neologisms in English, using Brexit as a model or as a source word. Brexit  was modelled after Grexit, a word coined to denote the possibility of Greece leaving the Eurozone, giving rise to at least two more similarly coined blends, Spexit and Itexit, referring to the prospect of the same event in Spain and Italy. However, this was just a beginning . . . → Read More: What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit?...
  • The grammar of engagement
  • 21 June 2018, Jen Malat
  • This blog post is written by Nicholas Evans, inspired by the Language and Cognition article “The grammar of engagement I: framework and initial exemplification” ‘Philosophy must plough over the whole of language’, as Wittgenstein famously stated. But which language? Singularising the noun allows a deceptive slippage between some language whose premises we take for granted (‘The limits of my language are the limits of my world’ was another great, and corrective, line of his) and ‘language’ in some dangerously, presumptively general sense. One of the great what-if questions for linguistics, philosophy and cognitive science is how different the last two millennia of western thought would be if we had built our . . . → Read More: The grammar of engagement...
  • Linguistics Competition: Figures of Speech
  • 15 June 2018, Victoria Willingale
  • Win an iPad Pro, Apple Pen, £100 of Cambridge University Press books and the chance to have your work seen by thousands! We are inviting academics, researchers, students and enthusiasts, from around the world, to share their passion for the subject through the medium of 6 cartoons. The competition theme is the Cambridge University Press language and linguistics collection which you are encouraged to creatively and imaginatively interpret. Your cartoons can be silly or serious, intricate or simplistic. You could incorporate word play such as puns and malapropisms, or you might choose to explore the linguistic community itself. To find out more and to enter please visit the FIGURES . . . → Read More: Linguistics Competition: Figures of Speech...