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  • ISSN: 0267-1905 (Print), 1471-6356 (Online)
  • Editor: and Alison Mackey Georgetown University, USA,
  • Editorial board
The Annual Review of Applied Linguistics publishes research on key topics in the broad field of applied linguistics. Each issue is thematic, providing a variety of perspectives on the topic through research summaries, critical overviews, position papers and empirical studies. Being responsive to the field, some issues are tied to the theme of that year's annual conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics. Also, at regular intervals an issue will take the approach of covering applied linguistics as a field more broadly, including coverage of critical or controversial topics. ARAL provides cutting-edge and timely articles on a wide number of areas, including language learning and pedagogy, second language acquisition, sociolinguistics, language policy and planning, language assessment, and research design and methodology, to name just a few.

The role of race in Applied Linguistics

AAAL is pleased to present the recording of a recent webinar in collaboration with the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics in which we highlight 3 articles from the latest volume that consider race, racial justice and Indigenous language revitalization in Applied Linguistics.

We have made the video and articles (see below) available to anyone so that this information can be shared widely. Please consider sharing this webinar with your colleagues and students to keep this important conversation going.

African Americans in World Language Study: The Forged Path and Future Directions
Uju Anya

Indigenous Language Revitalization and Applied Linguistics: Parallel Histories, Shared Futures?
Onowa McIvor

Is an Antiracist and Decolonizing Applied Linguistics Possible?
Suhanthie Motha

Other applied linguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • A message from Cambridge Editors
  • 23 September 2020, Jen Malat
  • We hope that you are all keeping safe and well during these strange times. It’s a shame that current circumstances prevent us from meeting in person at conferences   Andrew Winnard, Executive Publisher (sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology) Rebecca Taylor, Commissioning Editor (applied linguistics) Helen Barton, Commissioning Editor (formal and . . . → Read More: A message from Cambridge Editors...
  • Language as Symbolic Power
  • 28 August 2020, Rachel
  •  Written by Claire Kramsch, author of Language as Symbolic Power When twenty years ago I decided to teach an undergraduate course on Language and Power in my German department at UC Berkeley,  I didn’t have any other purpose in mind than to share my newly acquired insights into post-structuralist approaches to language study with students who were learning a foreign language. As they were working hard to acquire French or German and to develop the ability to communicate with foreign others, I wanted to show them how much more there is to language than just grammar and vocabulary. Why, behind their choices of what to say, what not to say, and how to say it, there was a whole power game going . . . → Read More: Language as Symbolic Power...
  • How a #CheekyNandos became more acceptable
  • 03 August 2020, Dan Iredale
  • By Laura R. Bailey (University of Kent) and Mercedes Durham (Cardiff University) Our recent article, A cheeky investigation: Tracking the semantic change of cheeky from monkeys to wines describes the behaviour of cheeky in British and American English. Introduction For Mercedes, growing up in French-speaking Switzerland but speaking American English at home meant having to ‘relearn’ English at school with her classmates. They were learning British English, which, for Mercedes, often led to confusion. Confusion sometimes turned into hilarity, particularly the time she was confronted with a picture of a dog stealing sausages and the exclamation ‘What a cheeky dog!’. Cheeky, for people or dogs, just wasn’t in her vocabulary. Fast forward a couple decades when she moved to the UK, and found that . . . → Read More: How a #CheekyNandos became more acceptable...