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Neighbourhood food store availability in relation to 24 h urinary sodium and potassium excretion in young Japanese women

  • Kentaro Murakami (a1), Satoshi Sasaki (a1), Yoshiko Takahashi (a2) and Kazuhiro Uenishi (a3)
Abstract

Previous studies on the relationship of local food environment with residents' diets have relied exclusively on self-reported information on diet, producing inconsistent results. Evaluation of dietary intake using biomarkers may obviate the biases inherent to the use of self-reported dietary information. This cross-sectional study examined the association between neighbourhood food store availability and 24 h urinary Na and K excretion. The subjects were 904 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18–22 years. Neighbourhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 0·5-mile (0·8-km) radius of residence. Urinary Na and K excretion and the ratio of urinary Na to K were estimated from a single 24 h urine sample. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, neighbourhood availability of confectionery stores/bakeries was inversely associated with urinary K, and was positively associated with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend = 0·008 and 0·03, respectively). Neighbourhood availability of rice stores showed an independent inverse association with urinary K (P for trend = 0·03), whereas neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores conversely showed an independent positive association with this variable (P for trend = 0·03). Furthermore, neighbourhood availability of fruit/vegetable stores showed an independent inverse association with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend = 0·049). In a group of young Japanese women, increasing neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores and fruit/vegetable stores and decreasing availability of confectionery stores/bakeries and rice stores were associated with favourable profiles of 24 h urinary K (and Na) excretion.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Kentaro Murakami, fax +81 3 5841 7873, email kenmrkm@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp
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12 WC Willett (1998) Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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