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  • ISSN: 1355-770X (Print), 1469-4395 (Online)
  • Editor: E. Somanathan Indian Statistical Institute|7 Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg|New Delhi 110016|India
  • Editorial board
Published in association with the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Environment and Development Economics is positioned at the intersection of environmental, resource and development economics. The Editor and Associate Editors, supported by a distinguished panel of advisors from around the world, aim to encourage submissions from researchers in the field in both developed and developing countries. The Journal is divided into two main sections, Theory and Applications, which includes regular academic papers and Policy Options, which includes papers that may be of interest to the wider policy community. Environment and Development Economics also publishes occasional Policy Fora (discussions based on a focal paper). Recent special issues have included 'Poverty and Climate Change', edited by Stephane Hallegatte, Marianne Fay and Edward B. Barbier, and 'Natural Resources and Economic Development' in collaboration with the Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP), edited by John Cockburn, Hélène Maisonnave and Luca Tiberti.

This journal has now moved over to electronic submission, using the Scholar One system. Click HERE to go to the submission website. Guidance on how to upload your manuscript is available on the site by clicking "Instructions and Forms" and then "Author Instructions".

Natural Resources and Economic Development



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