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  • ISSN: 0022-2267 (Print), 1469-7742 (Online)
  • Editors: Professor Kersti Börjars University of Oxford, UK, Professor Helen de Hoop Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands, Dr Hans van de Koot University College London, UK, and Professor Marc van Oostendorp Radboud University, The Netherlands,
  • Editorial board
Journal of Linguistics has as its goal to publish articles that make a clear contribution to current debate in all branches of theoretical linguistics. The journal also provides an excellent survey of recent linguistics publications, with book reviews in each volume and review articles on major works marking important theoretical advances. The journal includes a Notes and Discussion section for briefer contributions to current debate. The Editors welcome proposals for guest-edited special, thematic issues and for overview papers for the Looking Back, Moving Forward section.

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • A message from Cambridge Editors
  • 23 September 2020, Jen Malat
  • We hope that you are all keeping safe and well during these strange times. It’s a shame that current circumstances prevent us from meeting in person at conferences   Andrew Winnard, Executive Publisher (sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology) Rebecca Taylor, Commissioning Editor (applied linguistics) Helen Barton, Commissioning Editor (formal and . . . → Read More: A message from Cambridge Editors...
  • Language as Symbolic Power
  • 28 August 2020, Rachel
  •  Written by Claire Kramsch, author of Language as Symbolic Power When twenty years ago I decided to teach an undergraduate course on Language and Power in my German department at UC Berkeley,  I didn’t have any other purpose in mind than to share my newly acquired insights into post-structuralist approaches to language study with students who were learning a foreign language. As they were working hard to acquire French or German and to develop the ability to communicate with foreign others, I wanted to show them how much more there is to language than just grammar and vocabulary. Why, behind their choices of what to say, what not to say, and how to say it, there was a whole power game going . . . → Read More: Language as Symbolic Power...
  • How a #CheekyNandos became more acceptable
  • 03 August 2020, Dan Iredale
  • By Laura R. Bailey (University of Kent) and Mercedes Durham (Cardiff University) Our recent article, A cheeky investigation: Tracking the semantic change of cheeky from monkeys to wines describes the behaviour of cheeky in British and American English. Introduction For Mercedes, growing up in French-speaking Switzerland but speaking American English at home meant having to ‘relearn’ English at school with her classmates. They were learning British English, which, for Mercedes, often led to confusion. Confusion sometimes turned into hilarity, particularly the time she was confronted with a picture of a dog stealing sausages and the exclamation ‘What a cheeky dog!’. Cheeky, for people or dogs, just wasn’t in her vocabulary. Fast forward a couple decades when she moved to the UK, and found that . . . → Read More: How a #CheekyNandos became more acceptable...