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The role of diet and nutrition on mental health and wellbeing

  • Lauren Owen (a1) and Bernard Corfe (a2) (a3)

Abstract

Mental, neurological and substance-use disorders presently represent the greatest global burden of disease. Likewise, depression and other psychopathologies are elevated risk comorbidities of other health hazards, such as obesity. Nutrition has been implicated in behaviour, mood and in the pathology and treatment of mental illness. In this brief editorial, we aim to set the scale of the problem in context and overview advances and recent evidence linking nutrition to psychological outcomes. The purpose of the 2016 Nutrition Society Winter Meeting, ‘Diet, nutrition and mental health and wellbeing’ was to review where the evidence is strong, where there are unmet needs for research and to draw together the communities working in this area to share their findings. The papers presented demonstrated clear advancements that are being made in this field. The meeting illustrated compelling support for nutrition as a modifiable risk factor. The present research in the field and evidence presented at the 2016 Nutrition Society Winter Meeting lead us to postulate that even interventions with relatively modest effect sizes may plausibly and significantly curtail the disease burden of mental and neurological disease by food- and nutrient-based approaches.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: L. Owen, email Dr.lauren.owen@gmail.com

References

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9. Stangl, D & Thuret, S (2009) Impact of diet on adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Genes Nutr 4, 271282.

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