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    Vedovato, Gabriela M Surkan, Pamela J Jones-Smith, Jessica Steeves, Elizabeth Anderson Han, Eunkyung Trude, Angela CB Kharmats, Anna Y and Gittelsohn, Joel 2016. Food insecurity, overweight and obesity among low-income African-American families in Baltimore City: associations with food-related perceptions. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 19, Issue. 08, p. 1405.


    Han, E. Jones-Smith, J. Surkan, P. J. Kharmats, A. Y. Vedovato, G. M. Trude, A. C. B. Anderson Steeves, E. and Gittelsohn, J. 2015. Low-income African-American adults share weight status, food-related psychosocial factors and behaviours with their children. Obesity Science & Practice, Vol. 1, Issue. 2, p. 78.


    Sattler, Melissa Hopkins, Laura Anderson Steeves, Elizabeth Cristello, Angelica Mccloskey, Morgan Gittelsohn, Joel and Hurley, Kristen 2015. Characteristics of Youth Food Preparation in Low-Income, African American Homes: Associations with Healthy Eating Index Scores. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, Vol. 54, Issue. 4, p. 380.


    Christiansen, Karina M.H. Qureshi, Farah Schaible, Alex Park, Sohyun and Gittelsohn, Joel 2013. Environmental Factors That Impact the Eating Behaviors of Low-income African American Adolescents in Baltimore City. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 45, Issue. 6, p. 652.


    Sheats, Jylana L. Middlestadt, Susan E. Ona, Fernando F. Juarez, Paul D. and Kolbe, Lloyd J. 2013. Understanding African American Women's Decisions to Buy and Eat Dark Green Leafy Vegetables: An Application of the Reasoned Action Approach. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 45, Issue. 6, p. 676.


    Bibeau, Wendy S. Saksvig, Brit I. Gittelsohn, Joel Williams, Sonja Jones, Lindsey and Young, Deborah Rohm 2012. Perceptions of the food marketing environment among African American teen girls and adults. Appetite, Vol. 58, Issue. 1, p. 396.


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Healthy food purchasing among African American youth: associations with child gender, adult caregiver characteristics and the home food environment

  • Pamela J Surkan (a1), Anastasia J Coutinho (a1), Karina Christiansen (a1), Lauren A Dennisuk (a1), Sonali Suratkar (a1), Erin Mead (a2), Sangita Sharma (a3) and Joel Gittelsohn (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S136898001000251X
  • Published online: 05 October 2010
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To examine how factors related to the home food environment and individual characteristics are associated with healthy food purchasing among low-income African American (AA) youth.

Subjects

A total of 206 AA youth (ninety-one boys and 115 girls), aged 10–14 years, and their primary adult caregivers.

Setting

Fourteen Baltimore recreation centres in low-income neighbourhoods.

Design

Cross-sectional study. We collected information about food purchasing, the home food environment, sociodemographic and psychosocial factors drawn from social cognitive theory. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the factors associated with the frequency and proportion of healthy food purchases in all youth and stratified by gender. Low-fat or low-sugar foods were defined as healthy.

Results

Youth purchased an average of 1·5 healthy foods (range = 0–15) in the week before the interview, comprising an average of 11·6 % (range = 0–80 %) of total food purchases. The most commonly purchased healthy foods included water and sunflower seeds/nuts. Healthier food-related behavioural intentions were associated with a higher frequency of healthy foods purchased (OR = 1·4, P < 0·05), which was stronger in girls (OR = 1·9, P < 0·01). Greater caregiver self-efficacy for healthy food purchasing/preparation was associated with increased frequency of healthy purchasing among girls (OR = 1·3, P < 0·05). Among girls, more frequent food preparation by a family member (OR = 6·6, P < 0·01) was associated with purchasing a higher proportion of healthy foods. No significant associations were observed for boys.

Conclusions

Interventions focused on AA girls should emphasize increasing food-related behavioural intentions. For girls, associations between caregiver self-efficacy and home food preparation suggest the importance of the caregiver in healthy food purchasing.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email psurkan@jhsph.edu
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  • ISSN: 1368-9800
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