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Are all types of vertical information created equal?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2013

Steven M. Weisberg
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122. smweis@temple.edu newcombe@temple.edu www.spatiallearning.org
Nora S. Newcombe
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122. smweis@temple.edu newcombe@temple.edu www.spatiallearning.org

Abstract

The vertical component of space occurs in two distinct fashions in natural environments. One kind of verticality is orthogonal-to-horizontal (as in climbing trees, operating in volumetric spaces such as water or air, or taking elevators in multilevel buildings). Another kind of verticality, which might be functionally distinct, comes from navigating on sloped terrain (as in traversing hills or ramps).

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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References

Restat, J. D., Steck, S. D., Mochnatzki, H. F. & Mallot, H. A. (2004) Geographical slant facilitates navigation and orientation in virtual environments. Perception 33(6):667–87.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Weisberg, S. M., Brakoniecki, E. & Newcombe, N. S. (2012) The other side of the mountain: Slope as a cue in navigation. Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Spatial Cognition, Rome, Italy, September 4–8, 2012.Google Scholar
Weisberg, S. M., Nardi, D. N., Newcombe, N. S. & Shipley, T. F. (2012) Sensing the slopes: Sensory modality effects on a goal location task. Poster presented at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Psychonomics Society, Minneapolis, MN, November 15–18, 2012.Google Scholar
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