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  • ISSN: 0007-0874 (Print), 1474-001X (Online)
  • Editor: Professor Charlotte Sleigh PO Box 73631, |London, |SW14 9BS
  • Editorial board
Published for The British Society for the History of Science. This leading international journal publishes scholarly papers and review articles on all aspects of the history of science. History of science is interpreted widely to include medicine, technology and social studies of science. BJHS papers make important and lively contributions to scholarship and the journal has been an essential library resource for more than thirty years. It is also used extensively by historians and scholars in related fields. A substantial book review section is a central feature. There are four issues a year, comprising an annual volume of over 600 pages.

Featured content







History blog

  • Why Revisit the Early Modern Canon?
  • 16 August 2018, Lisa Shapiro
  • The thing about canons is that they seem sacred. Challenging them, even revisiting them, can seem heretical. Facing these facts is the first step in addressing...
  • The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information
  • 14 August 2018, Louise Stewart
  • This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…...

Publications – The British Society for the History of Science (BSHS)

  • SMG Journal Writing Prize – call for entries
  • 01 February 2018, Alison Moulds
  • The submission deadline for this year’s Science Museum Group journal writing prize is 1st March 2018. The prize aims to encourage writing and publication by...
  • Science Museum Group Journal: Issue 8
  • 10 January 2018, Alison Moulds
  • Issue 8 of the Science Museum Group Journal is now available to read online here. The Science Museum Group Journal (ISSN: 2054-5770) is an open-access online...