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  • ISSN: 2049-7547 (Online)
  • Editors: Dennis Preston University of Kentucky, USA, and Francisco Moreno-Fernández Heidelberg University, Germany
  • Editorial board
The Journal of Linguistic Geography focuses on dialect geography and the spatial distribution of language relative to questions of variation and change. The journal examines topics in dialectology, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, language in its sociocultural environment, typology, and investigations of the theoretical contributions by geographically based studies to general linguistics. Articles inclusive of maps, sound files, and data sets, as may be appropriate, are welcomed.

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Other sociolinguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!
  • 18 December 2020, Dan Iredale
  • Written by James Stratton, author of A Diachronic Analysis of the Adjective Intensifier well from Early Modern English to Present Day English in the Canadian If you want to convince someone that the book you just read is worth reading, you can intensify your speech. Intensifiers are linguistic devices which allow speakers to impress, praise, persuade, and generally influence a listener’s understanding of a message. A sentence like “the book was so interesting” is clearly more convincing than just “the book was interesting”. However, specific intensifiers can go stale over time if they are overused, which means that different intensifiers are favored at different points in time. In Present Day English, the three most frequently used intensifiers are so, really, and very, . . . → Read More: An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!...
  • Linguistic Reflections of a coronaspeak year
  • 10 December 2020, Rachel
  • Photo by Matthew Fassnacht on Unsplash Well, what a year this has been! A year like no other. Where life and even the way we interact changed. It is inevitable then that many of our authors blogged about the virus, its impact on not only us, but also our language. As Michael Toolan reflects ‘…as with every new phenomenon with the potential to turn our world upside down, our first response, immediate and intimate but with potential to go global, is in our language.’ Words such as lockdown, quarantine (Cambridge Dictionary’s word of the year 2020) and ‘the rona’ have all made their way into every day vocabulary. As David Crystal reflected, ‘the majority of the neologisms are blends – the combination of parts . . . → Read More: Linguistic Reflections of a coronaspeak year...
  • Fifty Years of JIPA
  • 20 November 2020, Jen Malat
  • This year JIPA celebrates 50 years under its present title, and 20 years of publication with CUP. But that’s only part of a 134-year story. Under earlier titles After a hundred years of conventional typesetting and printing, the journal went through an innovative era of desktop publishing in the 1980s and 90s. The partnership with CUP began with Volume 31 in 2001, and the journal acquired its striking black and orange cover. . . . → Read More: Fifty Years of JIPA...