Literature

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World Crime Fiction

At the end of “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” Edgar Allan Poe’s detective Auguste Dupin, the prototype of the analytical detective, offers a disparaging verdict on the Parisian Prefect of Police.…

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Cambridge to publish a new flagship journal in the fast-growing field of Pakistan studies

Critical Pakistan Studies will be the first international journal devoted to the study of Pakistan and its peopleJournal will be interdisciplinary and open accessAims to give the widest possible understanding of Pakistan, past, and present Cambridge University Press is to publish the world’s first international journal devoted to the study of Pakistan and its people.…

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The Last of the Moderns

Adalet Ağaoğlu, one of the most prominent authors of modern Turkish literature, passed away at the age of 91 leaving behind a literary legacy that will be difficult to match for years to come.…

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Always Connect

“Always Connect” seems more fundamental than “Always Historicize,” at least for the long eighteenth century (pace Jameson and Foucault). People characterized themselves and others through their multiple relations and positions relative to each other, as master-servant, master-slave, patron-client, parent-child, sister, brother, friend, daughter, feme sole or wife.…

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The Long Lives of Old Books

In 1584 Edmund Roberts had just a few months to live. A devout Christian, the book of hours that he used every day to guide his prayers was old and worn, with extra texts crammed into spaces that had originally been left blank.…

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The Accidental Austen Professor

In 1997, I was asked by my department chair at Marquette University to teach a course on Jane Austen. I had read all of her novels, some of them as a child, but had taught only one of them, Sense and Sensibility, as part of an undergraduate survey on British literature from 1800 to the present.…

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Shaping the History of the Graphic Novel

Ten years ago, it would have been literally unthinkable to publish this volume. Nobody then would have believed in the lasting presence and impact of a genre that was still treated with little respect, a suspicious attempt to forget about the awful reputation of comics.…

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Reading Jane Austen during Women’s History Month

I don’t know that Jane Austen is the first author to come to mind in relation to International Women’s Day: one is perhaps more likely to think of notorious firebrands from Mary Wollstonecraft to Arundhati Roy, whereas Austen is stuck with a relatively sedate reputation. But Austen has more in common with Wollstonecraft than many readers imagine.

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