parasitology

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Comparative transcriptomics from intestinal cells of permissive and non-permissive hosts during Ancylostoma ceylanicum infection reveals unique signatures of protection and host specificity

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Comparative transcriptomics from intestinal cells of permissive and non-permissive hosts during Ancylostoma ceylanicum infection reveals unique signatures of protection and host specificity and is freely available. …

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Comments on Parasitology paper – Effects of parasitic freshwater mussels on their host fishes: a review

Starting my PhD in 2020 on the conservation of Swedish parasitic freshwater mussels (Order: Unionida), I initially noted a lack of effort put into the study of what these mussels actually do to their hosts. If our goal is to increase the number of these mussels in our lakes and rivers, this will inevitably have some downstream impact on their host fishes.

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Cyclospora cayetanensis comprises at least 3 species that cause human cyclosporiasis

Despite its impact on United States (US) food safety since the 1990’s, efforts to understand Cyclospora cayetanensis genetics only really began within the last 7 years. However, we have learned a great deal over that time; genotyping technologies now exist for Cyclospora, and these are being used routinely to complement cyclosporiasis outbreak investigations performed by US public health agencies

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Hard Ticks from Down Under in Burmese Amber

Amber is a rich source of invertebrate fossils that constantly turn up new families, genera, and species. To become an amber fossil, an organism needs to be trapped in tree resin oozing from injured trees, which hardens and gets buried beneath sediment before fossilization at high pressure and temperature.

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Parasitology celebrates World Fisheries Day with Special Issue on fish parasites

Over the past 18 months, several authors and two Guest Editors have worked together on a Special Issue (SI) on Fish Parasites for the Cambridge University Press journal, Parasitology, the longest-running journal among periodicals in the field. Our SI contains 13 articles, including reviews and original research articles, co-authored by world-leading experts in individual research fields of fish parasitology.

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The impact of parasite infection of mental illness

More and more research is finding inflammation as a potential contributing factor towards to the development of various mental illnesses. A systematic review was conducted to determine the association between parasitic infection and mental illnesses in various African populations.  Two parasite groups were evaluated; helminths and protozoans, and four mental illness classifications; depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, schizotypal disorders and unspecified mental illnesses.

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Lost in Time

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is “A remarkable assemblage of ticks from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber” and is available open access.…

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A Sincere Thanks to Our Parasitology Reviewers

It takes a lot of people to publish an issue of Parasitology. Each year the journal successfully publishes 14 issues, with over 170 papers contained therein. Essential, of course, are our dedicated authors but there are also many “behind-the-scenes” people crucial in making sure we disseminate high quality research into the public domain

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A novel culture model for Cystoisospora suis

Cystoisospora suis is an intestinal protozoan parasite of swine, especially of suckling piglets. It severely affects the host by causing diarrhoea and reduced weight gain. This considerably impairs animal health, welfare and productivity. The parasite has a worldwide distribution, and infections are very common. The parasite belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa, which also includes other species of great medical and veterinary relevance by causing malaria, toxoplasmosis or coccidiosis.

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How sociality affects parasitism

The evolutionary arms race between parasites and their hosts have been fascinating/puzzling scientists for many years, and current World events have made even clearer about the importance of understanding host-parasite interactions.

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“A Tale of a Man, a Worm and a Snail” – A Book Review

This year a new 275-page book, with 21 chapters, entitled "The Tale of a Man, a Worm and a Snail: The Schistosomiasis Control Initiative" written by Professor Alan Fenwick OBE, with the help of Wendie Norris and Becky McCall, first appeared in January. It is part autobiography, part scientific narrative, with an impressive bibliography. Typical of CABI publishers, the book has a high printed production standard with several colour photographs and schematic graphics that embellish its narrative.

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Cambridge University Press celebrates World NTD Day

On 30th January, we celebrate World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day. This annual celebration highlights the hard work and achievements of the many researchers, medical workers, NGOs and other committed individuals in this field, and acts as a convenient forum to demand and sustain the necessary concerted actions to #BeatNTDs.…

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Invasions by parasites with complex life cycles

Biological invasions have significant impacts on biodiversity, community structure, and ecosystem processes, often leading to the emergence of diseases that could have significant economic, public health, and conservation implications. These invasions are usually driven by anthropogenic disturbances on ecosystems and the increased movement of goods and people on a global scale.

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Lockdown effect on cryptosporidiosis in New Zealand

Cryptosporidium species are intestinal parasites that infect a wide range of vertebrate host species, causing a considerable burden of gastrointestinal disease. Cryptosporidium infections in humans are mostly caused by two species: C. hominis, which is primarily transmitted from human-to-human, and C. parvum, which is mainly derived from animals, particularly livestock.

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Kinetoplastid Cell Biology and Genetics

The British Society for Parasitology (BSP) is affiliated with the Cambridge University Press (CUP) journal Parasitology and BSP/CUP frequently collaborate to produce special issues dedicated to showcasing BSP meetings. The present issue is unusual for several reasons; it showcases a BSP meeting held outside of the UK (in Granada, Spain), it is devoted to the Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis Symposium, a biannual gathering of folks with interests in these diseases and also represents the only BSP meeting of 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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World Ocean Day

We celebrate World Ocean Day to remind us of how important the marine habitat is today and its need for better environmental stewardship tomorrow.…

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Parasitic fauna of African large mammals

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is “Some gastrointestinal nematodes and ixodid ticks shared by several wildlife species in the Kruger National Park, South Africa“ With conservation of African mammalian species in mind, wildlife reserves and managed game parks continue to offer some protection to many species and associated natural habitats.…

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Toxoplasma gondii: one species with several genotypes; but do these induce differences in the host’s immune response?

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is “Early immune responses and parasite tissue distribution in mice experimentally infected with oocysts of either archetypal or non-archetypal genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii“ Toxoplasmosis is a well-known disease caused by the single celled parasite called Toxoplasma gondii, which is found worldwide.…

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Who says aging is always disappointing?

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is “Eimeria bovis infections induce G1 cell cycle arrest and a senescence-like phenotype in endothelial host cells“ Eimeria bovis is a globally spread, host-specific parasite of cattle, causing severe bloody diarrhoea, especially in calves, and therefore high economic losses worldwide.…

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Granulocyte vs. oncosphere – who’s calling the shots?

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Agranulocytosis leads to intestinal Echinococcus multilocularis oncosphere invasion and hepatic metacestode development in naturally resistant Wistar rats Let me introduce you to a tiny tapeworm that is widely distributed in the northern hemisphere: Echinococcus multilocularis.…

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What Lurked in the Intestines of Our Renaissance Ancestors?

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is A comparative study of parasites in three latrines from Medieval and Renaissance Brussels, Belgium (14th–17th centuries) In modern times intestinal parasites such as protozoa that cause dysentery and multicellular helminths (worms) are largely a problem for people in low-income countries in the tropics where sanitation and food safety are poor.…

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How does the translation machinery of Plasmodium falciparum handle multiple upstream open reading frames?

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is “Messenger RNAs with large numbers of upstream Open Reading Frames are translated via leaky scanning and reinitiation in the asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum“ Malaria, an ancient disease, continues to infect millions of humans worldwide, with Plasmodium falciparum parasites being the causative agents of the majority of severe malaria cases and fatal outcomes.…

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How to easily apply computational methods to the identification of drugs against trypanosomatid-caused diseases

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Computational approaches for drug discovery against trypanosomatid-caused diseases Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) caused by trypanosomatid parasites such as American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) and leishmaniasis affect millions of people worldwide, mainly in developing countries, and consequently produce a significant health, social and economic impact.…

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The unexpected interplay among humans, elephants and worms

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Strongylid infection varies with age, sex, movement and social factors in wild African elephants Thankfully new knowledge was gleaned from the instances when I army-crawled up to fresh dung in undrivable areas, or wrestled once again to neatly put the chronic diarrhea of R8.00 (more affectionately known as T.…

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It’s in the blood

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is The host-specificity of Theileria sp. (sable) and Theileria sp. (sable-like) in African Bovidae and detection of novel Theileria in antelope and giraffe Have you ever wondered whether the meat you eat contains parasites?…

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Prospects for better diagnosis of male genital schistosomiasis

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is How can schistosome circulating antigen assays be best applied for diagnosing male genital schistosomiasis (MGS): an appraisal using exemplar MGS cases from a longitudinal cohort study among fishermen on the south shoreline of Lake Malawi Our paper on diagnostics originates from my soon-to-be-completed PhD study that has focused on developing a better understanding of the interplay between schistosomiasis and HIV in Malawian fishermen.…

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Rosetting revisited: exploring the evidence for host red blood cell receptors in malaria parasite rosetting

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Rosetting revisited: a critical look at the evidence for host erythrocyte receptors in Plasmodium falciparum rosetting Malaria claims the lives of almost half a million people worldwide every year, and millions more suffer the consequences of severe disease, including coma and severe anaemia.…

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