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Chapter 9 - Transient Ischemic Attack

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2019

Mary Carter Denny
Affiliation:
Georgetown University Hospital
Ahmad Riad Ramadan
Affiliation:
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Sean I. Savitz
Affiliation:
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
James Grotta
Affiliation:
Memorial Hermann Texas Medical School
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Summary

Transient neurological symptoms often present a difficult diagnostic dilemma. It is often difficult to tell if the transient symptoms were due to ischemia or due to something else (see Chapter 1). Usually, by the time the physician sees the patient, the neurological exam has returned to normal. On the other hand, it is critically important not to miss the diagnosis of transient ischemic attack (TIA). TIAs may provide an opportunity for physicians to intervene and prevent an ischemic stroke and subsequent disability, and must be taken seriously. The search for an etiology must be done expeditiously. Just as angina may serve as a warning for future myocardial infarction, a TIA is often a warning sign of an impending stroke.

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Chapter
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Acute Stroke Care , pp. 153 - 159
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Albers, GW, Caplan, LR, Easton, JD, et al. Transient ischemic attack: proposal for a new definition. N Engl J Med 2002; 347: 17131716.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Johnston, SC, Gress, DR, Browner, WS, Sidney, S. Short-term prognosis after emergency department diagnosis of TIA. JAMA 2000; 284: 29012906.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Johnston, SC, Rothwell, PM, Nguyen-Huynh, MN, et al. Validation and refinement of scores to predict very early stroke risk after transient ischaemic attack. Lancet 2007; 369: 283292.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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