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18 - How Multimedia Can Improve Learning and Instruction

from Part IV - General Learning Strategies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2019

John Dunlosky
Affiliation:
Kent State University, Ohio
Katherine A. Rawson
Affiliation:
Kent State University, Ohio
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Summary

The multimedia principle is that human communication can be improved when pictures are added to words. Yet not all pictures produce the same benefits to student learning. So, in this chapter, I discuss evidence relevant to developing the most effective multimedia instruction. In doing so, I provide a meta-analysis of the literature on a variety of principles relevant to reducing extraneous processing in multimedia learning.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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