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11 - The Classical Philosophical Writings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2008

Michael Loewe
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Edward L. Shaughnessy
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
David Nivison
Affiliation:
Stanford University
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Summary

The Lü shi chunqiu (Mr. Lü's spring and autumn (annals)), with a known data of completion (239 BC), and it bears the name not of its author but of the patron who engaged the nameless persons who actually wrote it. There is a background of basic concepts and values that shapes all philosophers, even indirectly the dropouts. Family relationships and lineage had always been especially prominent in the way Chinese society worked. Between the death of Confucius and the birth of Mencius falls the career of Mozi (circa 480-390). Master Mo was founder of an amazingly different philosophical movement. Some of Mencius's contemporaries who can in some sense be called philosophers were also men of consequence in the world of power. In addition to Shang Yang in Qin and Shen Buhai in Hann, there was also Hui Shi. The Lü shi chunqiu has chapters that one can identify as Yangist, Daoist, cosmologist, Confucian, and more.
Type
Chapter
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The Cambridge History of Ancient China
From the Origins of Civilization to 221 BC
, pp. 745 - 812
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1999

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