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18 - Changing Behavior Using Theories at the Interpersonal, Organizational, Community, and Societal Levels

from Part I - Theory and Behavior Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2020

Martin S. Hagger
Affiliation:
University of California, Merced
Linda D. Cameron
Affiliation:
University of California, Merced
Kyra Hamilton
Affiliation:
Griffith University
Nelli Hankonen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Taru Lintunen
Affiliation:
University of Jyväskylä
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Summary

On the one hand, human behavior and its determinants can be seen in terms of a relatively simple “input-output” system. On the other hand, it is also possible to envisage a more complex interplay between behavior and its determinants unfolding at multiple environmental levels. A key premise of this chapter is that planned behavior change programs should target not only the individual but also the environmental influences on behavior at the interpersonal, organizational, community, and societal levels. Each environmental level encompasses physical, social, and cultural dimensions. Two key ecological assumptions help us to identify intervention targets for promoting behavior change. First, behavior influences, and is influenced by, multilevel environmental factors; second, individual behavior both shapes and is shaped by the environment. The socioecological approach and the accompanying range of theoretical approaches described in this chapter do justice to both perspectives. This approach enables researchers to apply insights from theoretical frameworks at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and societal levels. The resulting multilevel interventions can target complex phenomena such as power differences, social networks, diffusion of innovations, organizational change, coalition building, and policy processes.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

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