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31 - Biological channel modeling and implantable UWB antenna design for neural recording systems

from Part VI - Brain interfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2015

Hadi Bahrami
Affiliation:
Laval University
Leslie A. Rusch
Affiliation:
Laval University
Benoit Gosselin
Affiliation:
Laval University
Sandro Carrara
Affiliation:
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Krzysztof Iniewski
Affiliation:
Redlen Technologies Inc., Canada
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Summary

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Chapter
Information
Handbook of Bioelectronics
Directly Interfacing Electronics and Biological Systems
, pp. 379 - 388
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

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