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Chapter 18 - Using Mathematical Models to Improve Access to Postsecondary Education

from Part IV - Rethinking Higher Education Admissions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 January 2020

María Elena Oliveri
Affiliation:
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey
Cathy Wendler
Affiliation:
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey
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Summary

This chapter proposes the use of a mathematical approach that helps support the access and diversity goals of higher education institutions while still maintaining academic standards. This approach, called constrained optimization, allows both academic requirements and other factors – race/ethnicity, income level, social status, geographic region, educational background – to be considered during the admissions process. While diversity efforts vary by country and institution, constrained optimization seeks to improve higher education access for particular groups of students. As such, this may be a useful approach for ensuring that the multiple objectives of the admissions process of any country are achieved.

Type
Chapter
Information
Higher Education Admissions Practices
An International Perspective
, pp. 333 - 346
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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