Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-2vtd9 Total loading time: 0.513 Render date: 2022-06-27T12:43:23.374Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Book contents

29 - PATTERNS GENERATE ARCHITECTURES

ECOOP '94–Object-Oriented Programming, August, 1994

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

Kent Beck
Affiliation:
First Class Software, Inc.
Get access

Summary

This was a very important article for me. I had been writing solo for some time. I needed to collaborate more, especially since I had been independent for almost a year and I was getting lonely for technical collaboration.

Bruce Anderson organized this fantastic workshop for IBM at its educational site in Thornwood, New York. Ralph Johnson was another one of the teachers. Late one night, I grabbed him and said, “I bet we can describe HotDraw using patterns.” He didn't know quite what I meant, but he has learned to humor me (probably because he's big enough to just bop me if I get out hand). There in a spartan little room in IBM's training facility in up state New York, we tried to recreate HotDraw using only patterns—this pattern tells us to create this object, then this pattern splits it in two, then…

The result was one of those crackling moments when you know you have something. Early the next morning, I described HotDraw to Desmond D'Souza, first using CRC cards the way I always had, then using the patterns. He confirmed that the pattern description communicated the “why” of the design much more clearly.

Ralph and I were confident enough of our findings that we wrote up the paper with a sweeping conclusion—any object architecture can be derived by applying a set of patterns.

Type
Chapter
Information
Kent Beck's Guide to Better Smalltalk
A Sorted Collection
, pp. 257 - 276
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×