Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-ct24h Total loading time: 0.672 Render date: 2022-05-22T14:36:37.709Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2018

José Luis Bermúdez
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ahmed, A. 2014. Evidence, Decision, and Causality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arntzenius, F., Elga, A., and Hawthorne, J.. 2004. Bayesianism, infinite decisions, and binding. Mind 113:251–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bacharach, M. 2006. Beyond Individual Choice: Teams and Frames in Game Theory. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumeister, R. F., Bratslavsky, E., Muraven, M., and Tice, D. M.. 1998. Ego depletion: Is the active self a limited resource? Journal of Personal and Social Psychology 74:1252–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumeister, R. F., and Tierney, J.. 2011. Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength. New York, NY: Penguin.Google Scholar
Bobonich, C., and Destrée, P.. 2007. Akrasia in Greek Philosophy: From Socrates to Plotinus. Leiden: Brill.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bratman, M. 1999. Faces of Intention. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chakrabarti, K. K. 1999. Classical Indian Philosophy of Mind: The Nyâya Dualist Tradition. Albany, NY: Southern University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Gauthier, D. 1994. Assure and threaten. Ethics 104:690721.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gauthier, D. 1997. Resolute choice and rational deliberation: A critique and a defense. Nous 31:125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gollwitzer, P. M., and Sheeran, P.. 2006. Implementation intentions and goal achievement: A meta‐analysis of effects and processes. In Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (pp. 69119). New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Hagger, M. S., Chatzisarantis, N. D. L., Alberts, H., et al. 2016. A multilab preregistered replication of the ego-depletion effect. Perspectives on Psychological Science 11(4):546–73.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hamilton, E., and Cairns, H.. 1961. Plato: The Collected Dialogues: Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Hammond, P. J. 1976. Changing tastes and coherent dynamic choice. Review of Economic Studies 43:159–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holton, R. 2009. Willing, Wanting, Waiting. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hume, D. 1739–40/1978. A Treatise of Human Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Irwin, T. 1995. Plato’s Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levi, I. 1989. Rationality, prediction, and autonomous choice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 19:339–63Google Scholar
McClennen, E. F. 1990. Rationality and Dynamic Choice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McClennen, E. F. 1998. Rationality and rules. In Modeling Rationality, Morality, and Evolution, ed. Danielson, P. A. (pp. 13–40). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Mele, A. R. 2012. Backsliding: Understanding Weakness of Will. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mischel, W., and Ayduk, O.. 2004. Willpower in a cognitive-affective processing system. In Handbook of Self-Regulation: Research, Theory, and Applications, ed. Baumeister, R. F. and Vohs, K. D. (pp. 99–129). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Mischel, W., Ayduk, O., Berman, M. G., et al. 2011. “Willpower” over the life span: decomposing self-regulation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 6:252–56.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Muraven, M. 2010. Building self-control strength: Practicing self-control leads to improved self-control performance. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 46:465–68.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Muraven, M., Baumeister, R. F., and Tice, D. M.. 1999. Longitudinal improvement of self-regulation through practice: Building self-control strength through repeated exercise. Journal of Social Psychology 139:446–57.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oaten, M. and Cheng, K.. 2006. Longitudinal gains in self-regulation from regular physical exercise. British Journal of Health Psychology 11:717–33.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rabinowicz, W. 1995. To have one’s cake and eat it: Sequential choice and expected utility violation. Journal of Philosophy 92:586620.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spohn, W. 1977. Where Luce and Krantz do really generalize Savage’s decision model. Erkenntnis 11:113–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Strotz, R. H. 1956. Myopia and inconsistency in dynamic utility maximization. Review of Economic Studies 23:165–80.Google Scholar
Virág, C. 2017. The Emotions in Early Chinese Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×