Skip to main content
×
×
Home
British Economic Growth, 1270–1870
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 3
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Erikson, Emily and Hamilton, Mark 2018. Companies and the Rise of Economic Thought: The Institutional Foundations of Early Economics in England, 1550–1720. American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 124, Issue. 1, p. 111.

    Tomory, Leslie 2016. Technology in the British Industrial Revolution. History Compass, Vol. 14, Issue. 4, p. 152.

    Álvarez-Nogal, Carlos Prados De La Escosura, Leandro and Santiago-Caballero, Carlos 2016. Spanish agriculture in the little divergence. European Review of Economic History, Vol. 20, Issue. 4, p. 452.

    ×

Book description

This is a definitive new account of Britain's economic evolution from a backwater of Europe in 1270 to the hub of the global economy in 1870. A team of leading economic historians reconstruct Britain's national accounts for the first time right back into the thirteenth century to show what really happened quantitatively during the centuries leading up to the Industrial Revolution. Contrary to traditional views of the earlier period as one of Malthusian stagnation, they reveal how the transition to modern economic growth built on the earlier foundations of a persistent upward trend in GDP per capita which doubled between 1270 and 1700. Featuring comprehensive estimates of population, land use, agricultural production, industrial and service-sector production and GDP per capita, as well as analysis of their implications, this will be an essential reference for anyone interested in British economic history and the origins of modern economic growth more generally.

Reviews

‘This book continues the path-breaking tradition initiated by Phyllis Deane and W. A. Cole [in] British Economic Growth, 1688-1959: Trends and Structure (1962). I can only congratulate Cambridge University Press for maintaining it and encouraging the publication of such a landmark in British and international economic history. My hope is that is will set the standards for research in other countries’ economic history.'

Leandro Prados de la Escosura - Universidad Carlos III

‘Our knowledge of Britain’s growth history has just taken a quantum leap forward. The authors’ well-documented fresh results force us to re-think the views of Malthus and Maddison on growth before 1800. Even the growth implications of the Black Death and the Industrial Revolution now look different. This team of authors sets a high standard of transparency, allowing others to replicate or revise their estimates.’

Peter H. Lindert - University of California, Davis

‘This invaluable volume combines the compilation of masses of core data for estimating GDP and GDP per capita across six centuries with a host of reinterpretations that challenge and frequently demolish long-cherished views of the past. It is a massive achievement that is certain to form the starting-point for historical studies of Britain's long-run economic performance for many years to come.’

John Hatcher - University of Cambridge

‘This is a path-breaking reconstruction and analysis of the British economy in the very long run, making full use of the available historical data from the Middle Ages onwards, which sets new standards for economic historical research into the ‘wealth of nations’ and sheds new light on the single most important question in the field: why did the Industrial Revolution happen in this part of the world?’

Jan Luiten van Zanden - Utrecht University

‘British Economic Growth, 1270–1870 is a true landmark in economic history. Based on extensive research and a meticulous comparison of sources, it will transform our understanding of Britain's past and also reshape the debate over the 'great divergence' and the causes of the Industrial Revolution.’

Philip T. Hoffman - California Institute of Technology

‘In this book, a team of leading UK economic historians reconstructs Britain's national accounts to show what happened quantitatively during the centuries leading up to the Industrial Revolution … Excellent bibliography. Summing up: recommended.’

J. Murdock Source: Choice

'British Economic Growth, 1270–1870 makes a big leap forward in our understanding of the long-run performance of what became the leading nineteenth-century economy and the workshop of the world. It does so by implementing a giant quantitative enterprise, one that will make it the standard data source for studying the evolution of the British economy for decades to come.’

Source: Journal of Economic Literature

'This book contains a remarkable amount of advanced scholarship in British economic history, making sense of over six centuries of economic development. It is aimed squarely at the economic history community and its authors can look forward to its influence being felt in that discipline for a long time.'

David Meredith Source: The English Historical Review

'British Economic Growth is the collective work of a remarkable international group of economic historians … It is an attempt to reconstruct England’s and Britain’s national income accounts from 1270 to 1870 and to reveal the origins of Britain’s modern economic growth. … a remarkable achievement, which transforms our understanding of Britain’s rise to economic supremacy. … This landmark in British and international economic history is recommended to both experts and all those who are interested in the interrelationships between history and economic development.'

György Borus Source: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×
Bibliography
’l-Fazl, Abū [1595] (1927), The Ā’ īn-i-Akbarī, trans. Blochman, H., Delhi: Low Price Publications.
Abu-Lughod, J. L. (1989), Before European hegemony: the world system A.D. 1250–1350, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Acemoglu, D.; Johnson, S.; and Robinson, J. (2005), ‘The rise of Europe: Atlantic trade, institutional change, and economic growth’, American Economic Review, 95, 546–79.
Afton, B.; and Turner, M. E. (2000), ‘The statistical base of agricultural performance in England and Wales, 1850–1914’, 1755–2140 in Collins, E. J. T. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. VII, 1850–1950, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Agrarian history of England and Wales, 8 vols. (1967–2000), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Agricultural Returns for Great Britain for 1871 (1871), British Parliamentary Papers LXIX, London: House of Commons.
Allen, M. (2001), ‘The volume of the English currency, 1158–1470’, Economic History Review, 54, 595–611.
Allen, M. (2012), Mints and money in medieval England, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Allen, R. C. (1988), ‘Inferring yields from probate inventories’, Journal of Economic History, 48, 117–25.
Allen, R. C. (1992), Enclosure and the yeoman: the agricultural development of the south midlands 1450–1850, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Allen, R. C. (1994) ‘Agriculture during the industrial revolution’, 96–122 in Floud, R. and McCloskey, D. (eds.), The economic history of Britain since 1700, vol. I, 1700–1860, 2nd edn, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Allen, R. C. (1999), ‘Tracking the agricultural revolution in England’, Economic History Review, 52, 209–25.
Allen, R. C. (2000), ‘Economic structure and agricultural productivity in Europe, 1300–1800’, European Review of Economic History, 3, 1–25.
Allen, R. C. (2001), ‘The great divergence in European wages and prices from the middle ages to the First World War’, Explorations in Economic History, 38, 411–47 (wages of labourers and craftsmen together with consumer price indices are available on the Global Prices and Incomes Database website at University of California, Davis: ).
Allen, R. C. (2005) ‘English and Welsh agriculture 1300–1850: output, inputs and income’, unpublished paper presented at International Economic History Congress, Helsinki, Session 122, ‘Progress, stasis, and crisis: demographic and economic developments in England and beyond, AD c.1000–c.1800’, .
Allen, R. C. (2009a), The British industrial revolution in global perspective, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Allen, R. C. (2009b), ‘Engels’ pause: technical change, capital accumulation, and inequality in the British industrial revolution’, Explorations in Economic History, 46, 418–35.
Allen, R. C. (no date) ‘Data: wages and price history’, .
Allen, R. C.; and Weisdorf, J. (2011), ‘Was there an “industrious revolution” before the industrial revolution? An empirical exercise for England, c. 1300–1830’, Economic History Review, 64, 715–29.
Álvarez-Nogal, C.; and Prados de la Escosura, L. (2013), ‘The rise and fall of Spain (1270–1850)’, Economic History Review, 66, 1–37.
Angeles, L. (2008), ‘GDP per capita or real wages? Making sense of conflicting views on pre-industrial Europe’, Explorations in Economic History, 45, 147–63.
Anon. (1968), A century of agricultural statistics: Great Britain 1866–1966, London: HMSO.
Arkell, T. (2000), ‘Interpreting probate inventories’, 72–102 in Arkell, T., Evans, N. and Goose, N. (eds.), When death do us part: understanding and interpreting the probate records of early modern England, Oxford: Leopard’s Head Press.
Ashton, T. S. (1948), The industrial revolution, London: Oxford University Press
Bailey, M. (1989), A marginal economy? East-Anglian Breckland in the later middle ages, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Barron, C. M. (2000), ‘London 1300–1540’, 395–440 in Palliser, D. M. (ed.), The Cambridge urban history of Britain, vol. I, 600–1540, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Bassino, J.-P.; Broadberry, S.; Fukao, K.; Gupta, B.; and Takashima, M. (2014), ‘Japan and the Great Divergence, 725–1874’,
Baten, J.; and Zanden, J.-L. (2008), ‘Book production and the onset of modern economic growth’, Journal of Economic Growth, 13, 217–35.
Bavel, B.; and Zanden, J.-L. (2004), ‘The jump start of the Holland economy during the late medieval crisis, c.1350–c.1500’, Economic History Review, 57, 503–32.
Bekar, C. T.; and Reed, C. G. (2013), ‘Land markets and inequality: evidence from medieval England’, European Review of Economic History, 17, 294–317.
Bennett, J. M. (1987), Women in the medieval English countryside: gender and household in Brigstock before the plague, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Beresford, M. (1989), ‘A review of historical research (to 1968)’, 3–75 in Beresford, M. and Hurst, J. G. (eds.), Deserted medieval villages, Gloucester: Alan Sutton.
Beveridge, W. (1939), Prices and wages in England from the twelfth to the nineteenth century, vol. I, Price tables: mercantile era, London: Longmans, Green.
Bhat, P. N. M.; and Halli, S. S. (1999), ‘Demography of bride prices and dowry: causes and consequences of the Indian marriage squeeze’, Population Studies, 53, 129–48.
Biddick, K. (1989), The other economy: pastoral husbandry on a medieval estate, Berkeley: University of California Press.
Blanchard, I. S. W. (1974), ‘Rejoinder: stannator fabulosus’, Agricultural History Review, 22, 62–74.
Blanchard, I. S. W. (1978), ‘Labour productivity and work psychology in the English mining industry, 1400–1600’, Economic History Review, 31, 1–24.
Blanchard, I. S. W. (1996), The middle ages: a concept too many?Avonbridge: Newlees Press.
Bogart, D. (2005), ‘Turnpike trusts and the transport revolution in eighteenth century England’, Explorations in Economic History, 42, 479–508.
Bolt, J.; and Zanden, J.-L (2014), ‘The Maddison project: collaborative research on historical national accounts’, Economic History Review, 67, 627–51.
Bolton, J. L. (1980), The medieval English economy, 1150–1500, London: Dent.
Boserup, E, (1965), The conditions of agricultural growth: the economics of agrarian change under population pressure, London: Allen and Unwin.
Boserup, E. (1981), Population and technological change: a study in long-term trends, Oxford: Blackwell.
Boulton, J. (2000), ‘London 1540–1700’, 315–46 in Clark, P. (ed.), The Cambridge urban history of Britain, vol. II, 1540–1840, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Brenner, R. (1976), ‘Agrarian class structure and economic development in pre-industrial Europe’, Past and Present, 70, 30–75.
Bridbury, A. R. (1962), Economic growth: England in the later middle ages, London: Allen and Unwin.
Britnell, R. H. (2001), ‘Specialization of work in England, 1100–1300’, Economic History Review, 54, 1–16.
Britnell, R. H. (2004), Britain and Ireland 1050–1530: economy and society, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Britton, E. (1977), The community of the vill: a study of family and village life in the fourteenth century, Toronto: Macmillan.
Broadberry, S. N. (2014), ‘Accounting for the Great Divergence’, London School of Economics, .
Broadberry, S. N.; and Gupta, B. (2006), ‘The early modern Great Divergence: wages, prices and economic development in Europe and Asia, 1500–1800’, Economic History Review, 59, 2–31.
Broadberry, S. N.; and Gupta, B. (2009), ‘Lancashire, India and shifting competitive advantage in cotton textiles, 1700–1850: the neglected role of factor prices’, Economic History Review, 62, 279–305.
Broadberry, S. N.; Fremdling, R.; and Solar, P. (2010), ‘Industry’, 164–86 in Broadberry, S. N. and O’Rourke, K. H. (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Europe, vol. I, 1700–1870, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Broadberry, S. N.; Leeuwen, B.; and Zanden, J.- L. (2012), ‘Reversals of fortune: Holland, Britain and the rise of the North Sea area, 1270–1870’, .
Broadberry, S. N.; Campbell, B. M. S.; and Leeuwen, B. (2013), ‘When did Britain industrialise? The sectoral distribution of the labour force and labour productivity in Britain, 1381–1851’, Explorations in Economic History, 50, 16–27.
Broadberry, S. N.; Custodis, J.; and Gupta, B. (2014a), ‘India and the Great Divergence: an Anglo-Indian comparison of GDP per capita, 1600–1871’, Explorations in Economic History (forthcoming).
Broadberry, S. N.; Guan, H.; and Li, D. (2014b), ‘China, Europe and the Great Divergence: a study in historical national accounting’, London School of Economics,
Brook, T. (2010), The troubled empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Buyst, E. (2011), ‘Towards estimates of long term growth in the southern Low Countries, c.1500–1846’, unpublished paper presented at HI-POD Workshop Quantifying long run economic development, University of Warwick in Venice, Palazzo Pesaro Papafava.
Cameron, R. (1967), ‘England, 1750–1844’, 15–59 in Cameron, R. (ed.), Banking in the early stages of industrialization: a study in comparative economic history, New York: Oxford University Press.
Campbell, B. M. S. (1980), ‘Population change and the genesis of commonfields on a Norfolk manor’, Economic History Review, 33, 174–92.
Campbell, B. M. S. (1981), ‘The population of early Tudor England: a re-evaluation of the 1522 Muster Returns and 1524 and 1525 Lay Subsidies’, Journal of Historical Geography, 7, 145–54.
Campbell, B. M. S. (1984), ‘Population pressure, inheritance, and the land market in a fourteenth-century peasant community’, 87–134 in Smith, R. M. (ed.), Land, kinship and lifecycle, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Campbell, B. M. S. (1995), ‘Measuring the commercialisation of seigneurial agriculture c.1300’, 132–93 in Britnell, R. H. and Campbell, B. M. S. (eds.), A commercialising economy: England 1086 to c.1300, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Campbell, B. M. S. (1997), ‘Economic rent and the intensification of English agriculture, 1086–1350’, 225–50 in Astill, G. and Langdon, J. (eds.), Medieval farming and technology: the impact of agricultural change in northwest Europe, Leiden: Brill.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2000), English seigniorial agriculture, 1250–1450, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2005), ‘The agrarian problem in the early fourteenth century’, Past and Present, 188, 3–70.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2007), Three centuries of English crop yields, 1211–1491, .
Campbell, B. M. S. (2008), ‘Benchmarking medieval economic development: England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, c.1290’, Economic History Review, 61, 896–945.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2009), ‘Four famines and a pestilence: harvest, price, and wage variations in England, thirteenth to nineteenth centuries’, 23–56 in Liljewall, B., Flygare, I. A., Lange, U., Ljunggren, L. and Söderberg, J. (eds.), Agrarhistoria på många sätt; 28 studier om manniskan och jorden. Festskrift till Janken Myrdal på hans 60-årsdag (Agrarian history many ways: 28 studies on humans and the land, Festschrift to Janken Myrdal 2009), Stockholm: KSLAB.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2010), ‘Nature as historical protagonist: environment and society in pre-industrial England’, Economic History Review, 63, 281–314.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2011), ‘Panzootics, pandemics and climatic anomalies in the fourteenth century’, 177–215 in Herrmann, B. (ed.), Beiträge zum göttinger umwelthistorischen Kolloquium 2010–2011, Göttingen: Universitätsverlag Göttingen.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2012), ‘Grain yields on English demesnes after the Black Death’, 121–74 in Bailey, M. and Rigby, S. H. (eds.), Town and countryside in the age of the Black Death: essays in honour of John Hatcher, Turnhout: Brepols.
Campbell, B. M. S. (2014), ‘National incomes and economic growth in pre-industrial Europe: insights from recent research’, Quaestiones Medii Aevi Novae, 18, 167–96.
Campbell, B. M. S.; and Bartley, K. C. (2006), England on the eve of the Black Death: an atlas of lay lordship, land and wealth, 1300–49, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Campbell, B. M. S.; and Ó Gráda, C. (2011), ‘Harvest shortfalls, grain prices, and famines in pre-industrial England’, Journal of Economic History, 71, 859–86.
Campbell, B. M.S.; and Overton, M. (1993), ‘A new perspective on medieval and early modern agriculture: six centuries of Norfolk farming, c.1250–c.1850’, Past and Present, 141, 38–105.
Campbell, B. M. S.; Galloway, J. A.; Keene, D. J.; and Murphy, M. (1993), A medieval capital and its grain supply: agrarian production and distribution in the London region, c.1300, No place: Historical Geography Research Group.
Campbell, B. M. S.; Bartley, K. C.; and Power, J. P. (1996), ‘The demesne-farming systems of post Black Death England: a classification’, Agricultural History Review, 44, 131–79.
Cantor, L. M. (1982), ‘Introduction: the English medieval landscape’, 17–24 in Cantor, L. (ed.), The English medieval landscape, London: Croom Helm.
Carus-Wilson, E. M. (1941), ‘An industrial revolution of the thirteenth century’, Economic History Review, 1st series, 11, 39–60.
Carus-Wilson, E. M. (1952), ‘The woollen industry’, 355–428 in Postan, M. M. and Rich, E. W. (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of Europe, vol. II, Trade and industry in the middle ages, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Carus-Wilson, E. M.; and Coleman, O. (1963), England’s export trade, 1275–1547, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Chartres, J. A. (1985), ‘The marketing of agricultural produce’, 406–502 in Thirsk, J. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. V, 1640–1750, Part II, Agrarian change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Cherry, J. (1994), ‘Leather’, 295–318 in Blair, J. and Ramsay, N. (eds.), English medieval industries: craftsmen, techniques, products, London: Hambledon.
Clark, C. (1951), The conditions of economic progress, 2nd edn, London: Macmillan.
Clark, G. (1991), ‘Labour productivity in English agriculture, 1300–1860’, 211–35 in Campbell, B. M. S and Overton, M. (eds.), Land, labour and livestock: historical studies in European agricultural productivity, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Clark, G. (2004), ‘The price history of English agriculture, 1209–1914’, Research in Economic History, 22, 41–125.
Clark, G. (2005), ‘The condition of the working-class in England, 1209–2004’, Journal of Political Economy, 113, 1307–40.
Clark, G. (2006), English prices and wages, 1209–1914, Global Price and Income History Group, University of California, Davis, .
Clark, G. (2007a), ‘The long march of history: farm wages, population and economic growth, England 1209–1869’, Economic History Review, 60, 97–135.
Clark, G. (2007b), A farewell to alms: a brief economic history of the world, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Clark, G. (2010a), ‘The macroeconomic aggregates for England, 1209–1869’, Research in Economic History, 27, 51–140.
Clark, G. (2010b), ‘1381 and the Malthus delusion’, MPRA Paper 25466,
Clark, G. (2011), ‘Major growth or Malthusian stagnation? Farming in England 1209–1869’, unpublished working paper, University of California at Davis.
Clark, G. (2013), ‘1381 and the Malthus delusion’, Explorations in Economic History, 50, 4–15.
Clark, G. (2014), ‘What were the British earnings and prices then? (new series)’, Measuring Worth:
Clark, G.; and Jacks, D. (2007), ‘Coal and the industrial revolution, 1700–1860’, European Review of Economic History, 11, 39–72.
Clark, G.; and Werf, Y. (1998), ‘Work in progress? The industrious revolution’, Journal of Economic History, 58, 830–43.
Clark, G.; Huberman, M.; and Lindert, P. H. (1995), ‘A British food puzzle, 1770–1850’, Economic History Review, 48, 215–37.
Clark, G.; Cummins, J.; and Smith, B. (2012), ‘Malthus, wages, and preindustrial growth’, Journal of Economic History, 72, 364–92.
Clark, P. (1976), ‘The ownership of books in England, 1560–1640: the example of some Kentish townsfolk’, 95–111 in Stone, L. (ed.), Schooling and society: studies in the history of education, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
Clark, P. (ed.) (2000), The Cambridge urban history of Britain, vol. II, 1540–1840, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Clarkson, L. A. (1966), ‘The leather crafts in Tudor and Stuart England’, Agricultural History Review, 14, 25–39.
Clarkson, L. A. (1989), ‘The manufacture of leather’, 466–85 in Mingay, G. E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. VI, 1750–1850, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Clay, C. G. A. (1984), Economic expansion and social change: England 1500–1700, vol. II, Industry, trade and government, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Cohn, S. K. (2007), ‘After the Black Death: labour legislation and attitudes towards labour in late-medieval Western Europe’, Economic History Review, 60, 457–85.
Coleman, D. C. (1977), The economy of England, 1450–1750, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Colquhoun, P. (1806), A treatise on indigence; exhibiting a general view of the national resources for productive labour; with propositions for ameliorating the condition of the poor, and improving the moral habits and increasing the comforts of the labouring people, particularly the rising generation; by regulations of political economy, calculated to prevent poverty from descending into indigence, to produce sobriety and industry, to reduce the parochial rates of the kingdom, and generally to promote the happiness and security of the community at large, by the diminution of moral and penal offences, and the future prevention of crimes, London: J. Hatchard.
Connell, B.; Jones, A. G.; Redfern, R.; and Walker, D. (2012), A bioarchaeological study of medieval burials on the site of St Mary Spital: excavations at Spitalfields Market, London E1, 1991–2007, London: Museum of London Archaeology.
Coppock, J. T. (1984), ‘Mapping the agricultural returns: a neglected tool of historical geography’, 8–55 in Reed, M. (ed.), Discovering past landscapes, London: Croom Helm.
Cornwall, J. (1970), ‘English population in the early sixteenth century’, Economic History Review, 23, 32–44.
Cornwall, J., ed. (1980), The county community under Henry VIII: the military survey, 1522 and the lay subsidy, 1524–5, Oakham: Rutland Record Society.
Crafts, N. F. R. (1976), ‘English economic growth in the eighteenth century: a re-examination of Deane and Cole’s estimates’, Economic History Review, 29, 226–35.
Crafts, N. F. R. (1985), British economic growth during the industrial revolution, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Crafts, N. F. R. (1989), ‘British industrialization in an international context’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 19, 415–28.
Crafts, N. F. R. (2004), ‘Steam as a general purpose technology: a growth accounting perspective’, Economic Journal, 114, 338–51.
Crafts, N. F. R.; and Harley, C. K. (1992), ‘Output growth and the British industrial revolution: a restatement of the Crafts–Harley view’, Economic History Review, 45, 703–70.
Crafts, N. F. R.; Leybourne, S. J.; and Mills, T. C. (1989), ‘Trends and cycles in British industrial production, 1700–1913’, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series A, 152, 43–60.
Cressy, D. (1980), Literacy and the social order: reading and writing in Tudor and Stuart England, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Darby, H. C. (1977), Domesday England, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Davies, R. S. W.; and Pollard, S. (1988), ‘The iron industry, 1750–1850’, 73–104 in Feinstein, C. H. and Pollard, S. (eds.), Studies in capital formation in the United Kingdom, 1750–1920, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Davis, R. (1954), ‘English foreign trade, 1660–1700’, Economic History Review, 7, 150–66.
Davis, R. (1962), The rise of the English shipping industry in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, London: Macmillan.
Davis, R. (1973), English overseas trade, 1500–1700, London: Macmillan.
Deane, P.; and Cole, W. A. (1962), British economic growth, 1688–1959: trends and structure, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Deane, P.; and Cole, W. A. (1967), British economic growth, 1688–1959: trends and structure, 2nd Edn,Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Deaton, A.; and Muellbauer, J. (1980), Economics and consumer behaviour, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
DeWindt, E. B. (1972), Land and people in Holywell-Cum-Needingworth: structures of tenure and patterns of social organization in an east midlands village, 1252–1457, Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
Dittmar, J. (2011), ‘Information technology and economic change: the impact of the printing press’, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 126, 1133–72.
Dodds, B. (2004), ‘Estimating arable output using Durham Priory tithe receipts, 1341–1450’, Economic History Review, 57, 245–85.
Dodds, B. (2007), Peasants and production in the medieval North-East: the evidence from tithes 1270–1536, Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer.
Dyer, A. (2000), ‘Appendix: ranking lists of English medieval towns’, 747–70 in Palliser, D. M. (ed.), The Cambridge urban history of Britain, vol. I, 600–1540, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Dyer, C. C. (1982), ‘Deserted medieval villages in the west midlands’, Economic History Review, 35, 19–34.
Dyer, C. C. (1988), ‘Changes in diet in the late middle ages: the case of harvest workers’, Agricultural History Review, 36, 21–38.
Dyer, C. C. (1989), Standards of living in the later middle ages: social change in England c.1200–1520, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Dyer, C. C. (2000), ‘Small towns 1270–1540’, 505–37 in Palliser, D. M. (ed.), The Cambridge urban history of Britain, vol. I, 600–1540, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Dyer, C. C. (2012), ‘Poverty and its relief in late medieval England’,Past and Present, 216, 41–78.
Ecclestone, M. J. (1996), ‘Dairy production on the Glastonbury Abbey demesnes 1258–1334’, unpublished M.A. dissertation, University of Bristol.
Ellison, T. [1886] (1968), The cotton trade of Great Britain, reprint of original edition, New York: Augustus Kelly.
Epstein, S. R. (2000), Freedom and growth: the rise of states and markets in Europe, 1300–1750, London: Routledge.
Fairbank, J. K. (1992), China: a new history, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Farmer, D. L. (1988), ‘Prices and wages’, 715–817 in Hallam, H. E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. II, 1042–1350, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Farmer, D. L. (1991), ‘Prices and wages, 1350–1500’, 431–525 in Miller, E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. III, 1348–1500, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Farnie, D. A. (2003), ‘Cotton, 1780–1914’, 721–60 in Jenkins, D. (ed.), The Cambridge history of Western textiles, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Feinstein, C. H. (1972), National income, expenditure and output of the United Kingdom, 1855–1965, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Feinstein, C. H. (1978), ‘Capital formation in Great Britain’, 28–96 in Mathias, P. and Postan, M. M. (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of Europe, vol. VII, The industrial economies: capital, labour and enterprise, Part I, Britain, France, Germany and Scandinavia, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Feinstein, C. H. (1988), ‘National statistics, 1760–1920: sources and methods of estimation for domestic reproducible fixed assets, stocks and works in progress, overseas assets, and land’, 257–471 in Feinstein, C. H. and Pollard, S. (eds.), Studies in capital formation in the United Kingdom, 1750–1920, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Feinstein, C. H. (1995), ‘Changes in nominal wages, the cost of living and real wages in the United Kingdom over two centuries, 1780–1990’, 3–36 in Scholliers, P. and Zamagni, V. (eds.), Labour’s reward: real wages and economic change in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe, Aldershot: Elgar.
Fenwick, C. C., ed. (1998), The poll taxes of 1377, 1379 and 1381, Part 1, Bedfordshire – Leicestershire, Oxford: British Academy and Oxford University Press.
Fenwick, C. C., ed. (2001), The poll taxes of 1377, 1379 and 1381, Part 2, Lincolnshire – Westmorland, Oxford: British Academy and Oxford University Press.
Fenwick, C. C., ed. (2005), The poll taxes of 1377, 1379 and 1381, Part 3, Wiltshire – Yorkshire, Oxford: British Academy and Oxford University Press.
Field, J.; and Erickson, A. (2009), ‘Prospects and preliminary work on female occupational structure in England from 1500 to the national census’, Occupations Project Paper 18, Cambridge: Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, .
Fisher, F. J. (1935), ‘The development of the London food market, 1540–1640’, Economic History Review, 1st series, 5, 46–54.
Fisher, F. J. (1940), ‘Commercial trends and policy in sixteenth-century England’, Economic History Review, 1st series, 10, 95–117.
Fisher, F. J. (1948), ‘The development of London as a centre of conspicuous consumption in the sixteenth and seventeenth century’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 4th series, 30, 37–50.
Fisher, F. J. (1950), ‘London’s export trade in the early seventeenth century’, Economic History Review, 3, 151–61.
Flinn, M. W. (1958), ‘The growth of the English iron industry, 1660–1760’, Economic History Review, 11, 144–53.
Flinn, M. W. (1984), The history of the British coal industry, vol. II, 1700–1830: The industrial revolution, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Floud, R.; Fogel, R. W.; Harris, B.; and Hong, S. C. (2011), The changing body: health, nutrition, and human development in the Western world since 1700, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Floud, R.; Wachter, K.; and Gregory, A. (1990), Height, health and history: nutritional status in the United Kingdom, 1750–1980, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Fussell, G. E. (1963), ‘The evolution of farm dairy machinery in England’, Agricultural History, 37, 217–24.
Galor, O.; and Weil, D. N. (2000), ‘Population, technology, and growth: from Malthusian stagnation to the demographic transition and beyond’, American Economic Review, 90, 806–28.
Geertz, C. (1963), Agricultural involution: the processes of ecological change in Indonesia, Berkeley: University of California Press.
Ginarlis, J.; and Pollard, S. (1988), ‘Roads and waterways’, 182–224 in Feinstein, C. H. and Pollard, S. (eds.), Studies in capital formation in the United Kingdom, 1750–1920, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Glennie, P. (1991), ‘Measuring crop yields in early modern England’, 255–83 in Campbell, B. M. S. and Overton, M. (eds.), Land, labour and livestock: historical studies in European agricultural productivity, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Goldberg, P. J. P. (1990), ‘Urban identity and the poll taxes of 1377, 1379, and 1381’, Economic History Review, 43, 194–216.
Goldstone, J. A. (2002), ‘Efflorescences and economic growth in world history: rethinking the “rise of the West” and the industrial revolution’, Journal of World History, 13, 323–89.
Goose, N.; and Evans, N. (2000), ‘Wills as an historical source’, 38–71 in Arkell, T., Evans, N. and Goose, N. (eds.), When death do us part: understanding and interpreting the probate records of early modern England, Oxford: Leopard’s Head Press.
Gottfried, R. S. (1978), Epidemic disease in fifteenth century England: the medical response and the demographic consequences, Leicester: Leicester University Press.
Gourvish, T. R.; and Wilson, R. G. (1994), The British brewing industry, 1830–1980, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Grigg, D. (1989), English agriculture: an historical perspective, Oxford: Blackwell.
Grove, J. (2004), Little Ice Ages, ancient and modern, vol. II, 2nd edn, London: Routledge.
Guo, S. (2000), Ethics and life: marriage behaviours in Qing Dynasty China, Hong Kong: The Commercial Press.
Hajnal, J. (1965), ‘European marriage patterns in perspective’, 101–43 in Glass, D. V. and Eversley, D. E. C. (eds.), Population in history: essays in historical demography, London: Edward Arnold.
Hall, P., ed. (1966), Von Thünen’s isolated state: an English edition of Der isolierte Staat by Johann Heinrich von Thünen, trans. Wartengerg, C. M., London: Pergamon.
Hallam, H. E. (1988), ‘Population movements in England, 1086–1350’, 508–93 in Hallam, H. E (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. II, 1042–1350, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hammersley, G. (1973), ‘The charcoal iron industry and its fuel, 1540–1750’, Economic History Review, 26, 593–613.
Hanawalt, B. A. (1979), Crime and conflict in English communities, 1300–1348, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Harley, C. K. (1982), ‘British industrialization before 1841: evidence of slower growth during the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History, 42, 267–89.
Harley, C. K. (1988), ‘Ocean freight rates and productivity, 1740–1913: the primacy of mechanical invention reaffirmed’, Journal of Economic History, 48, 851–76.
Harley, C. K. (1998), ‘Cotton textile prices and the industrial revolution’, Economic History Review, 61, 49–83.
Harvey, B. (1993), Living and dying in England, 1100–1540: the monastic experience, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Harvey, S. (1988), ‘Domesday England’, 45–136 in Hallam, H. E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. II, 1042–1350, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hatcher, J. (1973), English tin production and trade before 1550, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Hatcher, J. (1977), Plague, population and the English economy, 1348–1530, London: Macmillan.
Hatcher, J. (1986), ‘Mortality in the fifteenth century: some new evidence’, Economic History Review, 39, 19–38.
Hatcher, J. (1993), The history of the British coal industry, vol. I, Before 1700: towards the age of coal, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hatcher, J. (1994), ‘England in the aftermath of the Black Death’, Past and Present 144, 3–35.
Hatcher, J. (2002), ‘The great slump of the mid-fifteenth century’, 237–72 in Britnell, R. H. and Hatcher, J. (eds.), Progress and problems in medieval England: essays in honour of Edward Miller, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hatcher, J. (2011), ‘Unreal wages: long run living standards and the “golden age” of the fifteenth century?’, 1–24 in Dodds, B. and Liddy, C. D. (eds.), Commercial activity, markets and entrepreneurs in the middle ages: essays in honour of Richard Britnell, Woodbridge: Boydell.
Hatcher, J.; and Bailey, M. (2001), Modelling the middle ages: the history and theory of England’s economic development, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hatcher, J.; and Barker, T. C. (1974), A history of English pewter, London: Longman.
Hatcher, J.; Piper, A. J.; and Stone, D. (2006), ‘Monastic mortality: Durham Priory, 1395–1529’, Economic History Review, 59, 667–87.
Hayami, A. (1967), ‘Keizai Shakai no Seiretsu to sono Tokushitsu (The emergence of the economic society and its characteristics)’, 3–18 in Gakkai, S. K. (ed.), Atarashii Edo Jidaizo o Motomete (In search of the historical image of the Edo period), Tokyo: Toyo Keizai Shinposha.
Hayami, A.; and Tsubouchi, Y., eds. (1990), Economic and demographic development in rice producing societies: some aspects of East Asian economic history (1500–1900), Leuven: Leuven University Press.
Hersh, J.; and Voth, H.-J. (2009), ‘Sweet diversity: colonial goods and the rise of European living standards after 1492’, CEPR Discussion Paper DP7386. Available at SSRN: .
Higgs, E. (1987), ‘Women, occupations and work in the nineteenth century censuses’, History Workshop Journal, 23, 59–80.
Hindle, S. (2004), On the parish? The micro-politics of poor relief in rural England c.1550–1750, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Hindle, S. (2008), ‘Dearth and the English revolution: the harvest crisis of 1647–50’, Economic History Review, 61 S1, 64–98.
Hoffman, P. T.; Jacks, D.; Levin, P. A.; and Lindert, P. H. (2002), ‘Real inequality in Europe since 1500’, Journal of Economic History, 62, 322–55.
Hoffmann, W. G. (1955), British industry 1700–1950, Oxford: Blackwell.
Holderness, B. A. (1989), ‘Prices, productivity, and output’, 84–189 in Mingay, G. E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. VI, 1750–1850, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hollingsworth, T. H. (1969), Historical demography, London: Hodder and Stoughton.
Homer, R. F. (1991), ‘Tin, lead and pewter’, 57–80 in Blair, J. and Ramsay, N. (eds.), English medieval industries: craftsmen, techniques, products, London: Continuum International Publishing Group.
Horrell, S.; Humphries, J.; and Weale, M. (1994), ‘An input–output table for 1841’, Economic History Review, 47, 545–66.
Houstan, R. A. (1982), ‘The development of literacy: northern England, 1640–1750’, Economic History Review, 35, 199–216.
Huang, P. C. C. (2002), ‘Development or involution in eighteenth-century Britain and China? A review of Kenneth Pomeranz’s “The Great Divergence: China, Europe and the making of the modern world economy”’, Journal of Asian Studies, 61, 501–38.
Hulton, M. H. M., ed. (1999), Coventry and its people in the 1520s, Stratford-upon-Avon: The Dugdale Society.
Humphries, J. (2010), Childhood and child labour in the British industrial revolution, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hyde, C. K. (1977), Technological change and the British iron industry, 1700–1870, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
James, M. K.; and Veale, E. M. (1971), Studies in the medieval wine trade, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
John, A. H. (1976), ‘English agricultural improvements and grain exports, 1660–1765’, 45–67 in, Coleman, D. C. and John, A. H. (eds), Trade, government and economy in pre-industrial England, London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
John, A. H. (1989), ‘Statistical appendix’, 972–1155 in Mingay, G. E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. VI, 1750–1850, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Jones, E. L. (1965), ‘Agriculture and economic growth in England, 1660–1750: agricultural change’, Journal of Economic History, 25, 1–18.
Kain, R. J. P. (1986), An atlas and index of the tithe files of mid-nineteenth century England and Wales, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kanzaka, J. (2002), ‘Villein rents in thirteenth–century England: an analysis of the Hundred Rolls of 1279–80’, Economic History Review, 55, 593–618.
Karaman, K. K.; and Pamuk, S. (2010), ‘Ottoman state finances in European perspective, 1500–1914’, Journal of Economic History, 70, 593–629.
Kelly, M.; and Ó Gráda, C. (2012), ‘The preventive check in medieval and preindustrial England’, Journal of Economic History, 72, 1015–35.
Kelly, M.; and Ó Gráda, C. (2013), ‘Numerare est errare: agricultural output and food supply in England before and during the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History, 73, 1132–63.
Kermode, J. (2000), ‘The greater towns’, 441–65 in Palliser, D. M. (ed.), The Cambridge urban history of Britain, vol. I, 600–1540, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kerridge, E. (1967), The agricultural revolution, London: George Allen and Unwin.
Kerridge, E. (1985), Textile manufactures in early modern England, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
King, G. [1696] (1936), ‘Natural and political observations and conclusions upon the state and condition of England’, 11–56 in Barnett, G. E. (ed.), Two tracts by Gregory King, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
King, P. (2005), ‘The production and consumption of bar iron in early modern England and Wales’, Economic History Review, 58, 1–33.
Kitsikopoulos, H. (2012), ‘Epilogue’, 330–60 in Kitsikopoulos, H. (ed.), Agrarian change and crisis in Europe, 1200–1500, London: Routledge.
Komlos, J. (1993), ‘The secular trend in the biological standard of living in the United Kingdom, 1730–1860’, Economic History Review, 46, 115–44.
Komlos, J. (1998), ‘Shrinking in a growing economy? The mystery of physical stature during the industrial revolution’, Journal of Economic History, 58, 779–802.
Kussmaul, A. (1990), A general view of the rural economy of England, 1538–1840, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kuznets, S. (1955), ‘Economic growth and income inequality’, American Economic Review, 45, 1–28.
Kuznets, S. (1966), Modern economic growth: rate, structure and spread, New Haven: Yale University Press.
Langdon, J. (1982), ‘The economics of horses and oxen in medieval England’, Agricultural History Review, 30, 31–40.
Langdon, J. (1986), Horses, oxen and technological innovation: the use of draught animals in English farming from 1066 to 1500, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Langton, J.; and Hoppe, G. (1983), Town and country in the development of early modern Western Europe, Historical Geography Research Series 11, Norwich: Geo Books.
Le Roy Ladurie, E. (1966), Les Paysans de Languedoc, Paris: S. E. V. P. E. N. English edition (1974), The peasants of Languedoc, trans. J. Day, Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
Lee, C. H. (1986), The British economy since 1700: a macroeconomic perspective, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lee, J. Z.; and Wang, F. (1999), One quarter of humanity: Malthusian mythology and Chinese realities, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Lee, R. D. (1985), ‘Inverse projection and back projection: a critical appraisal, and comparative results for England, 1539 to 1871, Population Studies, 39, 233–48.
Leunig, T. (2011), ‘Measuring economic performance and social progress’, European Review of Economic History, 15, 357–63.
Lennard, R. V. (1959), Rural England 1986 to 1135: a study of social and agrarian conditions, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Letters, S. (2005), Gazetteer of markets and fairs in England and Wales to 1516, London: Centre for Metropolitan History, .
Lewis, G. R. (1908), The stannaries: a study of the medieval tin miners of Cornwall and Devon, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Lindert, P. H.; and Williamson, J. G. (1982), ‘Revising England’s social tables 1688–1913’, Explorations in Economic History, 19, 385–408.
Livi-Bacci, M. (1991), Population and nutrition: an essay on European demographic history, trans. Croft-Murray, T. and Ipsen, C., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lloyd, T. H. (1977), The English wool trade in the middle ages, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lo Cascio, E., and Malanima, P. (2009), ‘GDP in pre-modern agrarian economies (1–1820 AD): a revision of the estimates’, Rivista di storia economica, 25, 391–420.
Lopez, R. S. (1976), The commercial revolution of the middle ages, 950–1350, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Maddison, A. (2001), The world economy: a millennial perspective, Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Maddison, A. (2003), The world economy: historical statistics, Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Maddison, A. (2007), Contours of the world economy, 1–2030 AD: essays in macro-economic history, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Maddison, A. (2010), ‘Statistics on world population, GDP and per capita GDP, 1–2008 AD’, Groningen Growth and Development Centre,
Maitland, F. W. (1897), Domesday Book and beyond: three essays in the early history of England, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Malanima, P. (2002), L’economia italiana: dalla crescita medievale alla crescita contemporanea, Bologna: Il Mulino.
Malanima, P. (2011), ‘The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913’, European Review of Economic History, 15, 169–219.
Malthus, T. R. [1798] (1970), An essay on the principle of population, as it affects the future improvement of society with remarks on the speculations of Mr Godwin, M. Condorcet, and other writers, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
Malthus, T. R. [1803] (1992), An essay on the principle of population: or, a view of its past and present effects on human happiness: with an inquiry into our prospects respecting the future removal or mitigation of the evils which it occasions, 2nd edn, ed. Winch, D. and James, P., Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Marshall, E. J. P.; Wade, P. M.; and Clare, P. (1978), ‘Land drainage channels in England and Wales’, Geographical Journal, 144, 254–63.
Massie, J. [1760] (2010), A computation of the money that hath been exorbitantly raised upon the people of Great Britain by the sugar-planters, in one year, from January 1759 to January 1760; shewing how much money a family of each rank, degree or class hath lost by that rapacious monopoly having continued so long after I laid it open, in my state of the British sugar-colony trade, which was published last winter, London: The Making of the Modern World, Gale, Cengage Learning.
Mathias, P. (1959), The brewing industry in England, 1700–1830, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Mayhew, N. J. (1995a), ‘Modelling medieval monetisation’, 55–77 in Britnell, R. H. and Campbell, B. M. S. (eds.), A commercialising economy: England 1086 to c.1300, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Mayhew, N. J. (1995b), ‘Population, money supply, and the velocity of circulation in England, 1300–1700’, Economic History Review, 48, 238–57.
Mayhew, N. J. (2009), ‘Money supply and GDP in England 1085–1700’, unpublished paper presented at Session E4, 15th World Economic History Congress, Utrecht.
McCance, R. A.; and Widdowson, E. M. (1960), The composition of foods, Medical Research Council Special Report Series, 297 (3rd revised edn of Special Report No. 235), London: HMSO.
McIntosh, M. K. (1986), Autonomy and community: the royal manor of Havering, l200–1500, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
McIntosh, M. K. (2012), Poor relief in England, 1350–1600, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Milanovic, B.; Lindert, P. H.; and Williamson, J. G. (2007), Measuring ancient inequality, National Bureau of Economic Research, working paper 13550, ; Washington, D.C.: World Bank, .
Mitchell, B. R. (1988), British historical statistics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Mokyr, J. (1990), The lever of riches: technological creativity and economic progress, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Mokyr, J.; and Voth, H. J. (2010), ‘Understanding growth in Europe, 1700–1870: theory and evidence’, 7–42 in Broadberry, S. N. and O’Rourke, K. (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Europe, vol. I, 1700–1870, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Moor, T.; and Zanden, J. L. (2010), ‘Girl power: the European marriage pattern and labour markets in the North Sea region in the late medieval and early modern period’, Economic History Review, 63, 1–33.
Morris, R. (1979), Cathedrals and abbeys of England and Wales: the building church, 600–1540, London: Dent.
Mosk, C. (1980), ‘Nuptiality in Meiji Japan’, Journal of Social History, 13, 474–89.
Muldrew, C. (2011), Food, energy and the creation of industriousness: work and material culture in agrarian England, 1550–1780, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Munro, J. H. (1999), ‘The “industrial crisis” of the English textile towns, 1290–1330’, 103–41 in Prestwich, M., Britnell, R. H. and Frame, R. (eds.), Thirteenth-century England VII: proceedings of the Durham conference, Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer.
Munro, J. H. (2004), ‘Medieval woollens: the Western European woollen industries and their struggle for international markets, c. 1000–1500’, 228–324 in Jenkins, D. (ed.), The Cambridge history of Western textiles, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Munro, J. H. (no date), ‘The Phelps Brown and Hopkins “basket of consumables” commodity price series and craftsmen’s wage series, 1264–1700: revised by John H. Munro’, .
Musson, A. E. (1976), ‘Industrial motive power in the United Kingdom, 1800–70’, Economic History Review, 29, 415–39.
Musson, A. E. (1978), The growth of British industry, London: Batsford.
Neal, L. (1990), The rise of financial capitalism: international capital markets in the Age of Reason, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Nef, J. U. (1932), The rise of the British coal industry, vol. II, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
Nef, J. U. (1934), ‘The progress of technology and the growth of large-scale industry in Great Britain, 1540–1640’, Economic History Review, 1st series, 5, 3–24.
North, D. C.; and Weingast, B. R. (1989), ‘Constitutions and commitment: the evolution of institutions governing public choice in seventeenth-century England,’ Journal of Economic History, 49, 803–32.
O’Brien, P. K. (1982), ‘European economic development: the contribution of the periphery’, Economic History Review, 35, 1–18.
O’Brien, P. K. (2011), ‘The nature and historical evolution of an exceptional fiscal state and its possible significance for the precocious commercialization and industrialization of the British economy from Cromwell to Nelson’, Economic History Review, 64, 408–46.
O’Brien, P. K.; and Hunt, P. A. (1999), ‘England, 1485–1815’, 53–100 in Bonney, R. (ed.), The rise of the fiscal state in Europe, c. 1200–1850, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Oeppen, J. (1993), ‘Back projection and inverse projection: members of a wider class of constrained projection models’, Population Studies, 47, 245–67.
Oldland, J. (2013), ‘Wool and cloth production in late medieval and early Tudor England’, Economic History Review, 67, 25–47.
Ormrod, D. (2003), The rise of commercial empires: England and the Netherlands in the age of mercantilism, 1650–1770, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Ormrod, W. M. (1990), The regin of Edward III: crown and political society in England, 1327–1377, New Haven: Yale University Press.
Orwin, C. S.; and Whetham, E. H. (1971) History of British agriculture, 1846–1914, 2nd edn, Newton Abbot: David and Charles.
Outhwaite, R. B. (1986), ‘Progress and backwardness in English agriculture, 1500–1650’, Economic History Review, 39, 1–18.
Overton, M. (1979), ‘Estimating crop yields from probate inventories: an example from East Anglia, 1585–1735’, Journal of Economic History, 39, 363–78.
Overton, M. (1984), ‘Probate inventories and the reconstruction of agrarian landscapes’, 167–94 in Reed, M. (ed.), Discovering past landscapes, London: Croom Helm.
Overton, M. (1985), ‘The diffusion of agricultural innovations in early modern England: turnips and clover in Norfolk and Suffolk 1580–1740’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, new series, 10, 205–21.
Overton, M. (1986), ‘Agriculture’, 34–53 in Langton, J. and Morris, R. J. (eds.), Atlas of industrializing Britain 1780–1914, London: Methuen.
Overton, M. (1990), ‘Re-estimating crop yields from probate inventories: a comment’, Journal of Economic History, 50, 931–35.
Overton, M. (1991), ‘The determinants of crop yields in early modern England’, 284–322 in Campbell, B. M. S. and Overton, M. (eds.), Land, labour and livestock: historical studies in European agricultural productivity, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Overton, M. (1996), Agricultural revolution in England: the transformation of the agrarian economy 1500–1850, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Overton, M. (2000), ‘Prices from probate inventories’, 120–43 in Arkell, T., Evans, N. and Goose, N. (eds.), When death do us part: understanding and interpreting the probate records of early modern England, Oxford: Leopard’s Head Press.
Overton, M. (2006), ‘Household wealth, indebtedness, and economic growth in early modern England’, Open Research Exeter, .
Overton, M.; and Campbell, B. M. S. (1992), ‘Norfolk livestock farming 1250–1740: a comparative study of manorial accounts and probate inventories’, Journal of Historical Geography, 18, 377–96.
Overton, M.; and Campbell, B. M. S. (1996), ‘Production et productivité dans l’agriculture anglais, 1086–1871’, Histoire et Mesure, 11, 255–97.
Overton, M.; and Campbell, B. M. S. (1999), ‘Statistics of production and productivity in English agriculture, 1086–1871’, 189–208 in van Bavel, B. J. P. and Thoen, E. (eds.), Land productivity and agro-systems in the North Sea area (middle ages – twentieth century): elements for comparison, Turnhout: Brepols.
Overton, M.; Whittle, J.; Dean, D.; and Hann, A. (2004), Production and consumption in English households, 1600–1750, London: Routledge.
Parker, G. (2013), Global crisis: war, climate change and catastrophe in the seventeenth century, New Haven: Yale University Press.
Parthasarathi, P. (2011), Why Europe grew rich and Asia did not: global economic divergence, 1600–1850, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Pearson, R. (2004), Insuring the industrial revolution: fire insurance in Great Britain, 1700–1850, Aldershot: Ashgate.
Perren, R. (1975), ‘The meat and livestock trade in Britain, 1850–70’, Economic History Review, 28, 385–400.
Persson, K. G. (2008), ‘The Malthus delusion’, European Review of Economic History, 12, 165–73.
Persson, K. G. (2010), An economic history of Europe, 600 to the present, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Phelps Brown, H.; and Hopkins, S. V. (1955), ‘Seven centuries of building wages’, Economica, 22, 195–206.
Phelps Brown, H.; and Hopkins, S. V. (1956), ‘Seven centuries of the prices of consumables, compared with builders’ wage-rates’, Economica, 23, 296–314.
Phillips, A. D. M. (1989), The underdraining of farmland in England during the nineteenth century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Platt, C. (1994), The great rebuildings of Tudor and Stuart England, London: University College London Press.
Pollard, S. (1980), ‘A new estimate of British coal production, 1750–1850’, Economic History Review, 33, 212–35.
Pomeranz, K. (2000), The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the making of the modern world economy, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Pomeranz, K. (2011), ‘Ten years after: responses and reconsiderations’, Historically Speaking, 12, 20–5,
Poos, L. (1991), A rural society after the Black Death: Essex, 1350–1525, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Postan, M. M. (1962), ‘Village livestock in the thirteenth century’, Economic History Review, 15, 219–49.
Postan, M. M. (1966), ‘Medieval agrarian society in its prime: England’, 549–632 in Postan, M. M. (ed.), The Cambridge economic history of Europe, vol. I, The agrarian life of the middle ages, 2nd edn, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Postan, M. M. (1972), The medieval economy and society: an economic history of Britain in the middle ages, London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
Pound, J., ed. (1986), The military survey of 1522 for Babergh Hundred, Woodbridge: Suffolk Records Society and Boydell Press.
Power, J. P.; and Campbell, B. M. S. (1992), ‘Cluster analysis and the classification of medieval demesne-farming systems’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 17, 227–45.
Prange, S. (2011), ‘A trade of no dishonor: piracy, commerce, and community in the western Indian Ocean, twelfth to sixteenth century’, American Historical Review, 116, 1269–93.
Pressnell, L. S. (1956), Country banking in the industrial revolution, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Prest, A. R. (1954), Consumers’ expenditure in the United Kingdom, 1900–1919, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Prince, H. C. (1980), Parks in England, Shalfleet: Pinhorns.
Prince, H. C. (1989), ‘The changing rural landscape, 1750–1850’, 7–83 in Mingay, G. E. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, VI, 1750–1850, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Rackham, O. (1980), Ancient woodland, London: Edward Arnold.
Raftis, J. A (1974), Warboys: two hundred years in the life of a mediaeval village, Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
Raftis, J. A. (1990), Early Tudor Godmanchester: survivals and new arrivals, Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
Ramsey, P. H., ed. (1971), The price revolution in sixteenth-century England, London: Methuen.
Razi, Z. (1980), Life, marriage and death in a medieval parish: economy, society and demography in Halesowen, 1270–1400, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Reid, D. A. (1976), ‘The decline of Saint Monday 1766–1876’, Past and Present, 71, 76–101.
Riden, P. (1977), ‘The output of the British iron industry before 1870’, Economic History Review, 30, 442–59.
Rigby, S. H. (2010), ‘Urban population in late medieval England: the evidence of the lay subsidies’, Economic History Review, 63, 393–417.
Rowntree, B. S. (1901), Poverty: a study of town life, London: Macmillan.
Russell, J. C. (1948), British medieval population, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.
Saito, O. (2010), ‘By-employment and historical occupational structures in comparative perspective’, unpublished paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Economic History Society, University of Durham.
Sapoznik, A. (2013), ‘The productivity of peasant agriculture: Oakington, Cambridgeshire, 1360–1399’, Economic History Review, 66, 518–44.
Schofield, P. R. (1997), ‘Dearth, debt and the local land market in a late thirteenth-century village community’. Agricultural History Review, 45, 1–17.
Schofield, R. S. (1973), ‘Dimensions of illiteracy, 1750–1850’, Explorations in Economic History, 10, 437–44.
Schofield, R. S. (1994), ‘British population change, 1700–1871’, 60–95 in Floud, R. and McCloskey, D. N. (eds.), The economic history of Britain since 1700, vol. I, 1700–1860, 2nd edn, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Schön, L.; and Krantz, O. (2012), ‘The Swedish economy in the early modern period: constructing historical national accounts’, European Review of Economic History, 16, 529–49.
Schubert, H. R. (1957), History of the British iron and steel industry from c. 450 BC to AD 1775, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
Schumpeter, E. B. (1960), English overseas trade statistics, 1697–1808, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Seebohm, F. (1883), The English village community examined in its relations to the manorial and tribal systems and to the common or open field system of husbandry, an essay in economic history, London: Longmans Green.
Shaw-Taylor, L. (2009a), ‘The occupational structure of England and Wales, c.1750–1911’, Occupations Project Paper 19, Cambridge: Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, .
Shaw-Taylor, L. (2009b), ‘The nature and scale of the cottage economy’, Occupations Project Paper 15, Cambridge: Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, .
Shaw-Taylor, L.; and Wrigley, E. A. (2008), ‘The occupational structure of England c.1750–1871: a preliminary report’, Cambridge: Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
Shaw-Taylor, L.; Wrigley, E. A.; Kitson, P.; Davies, R.; Newton, G.; and Satchell, M. (2010), ‘The occupational structure of England, c.1710–1871’, Occupations Project Paper 22, Cambridge: Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, .
Slack, P. (1988), Poverty and policy in Tudor and Stuart England, London: Longman.
Slack, P. (1990), The English poor law, 1531–1782, Basingstoke: Macmillan.
Slavin, P. (2008), ‘Feeding the brethren: grain provisioning of Norwich Cathedral Priory, c.1280–1370’, unpublished PhD thesis, University of Toronto.
Slavin, P. (2009), ‘Chicken husbandry in late-medieval eastern England: c.1250–1400’, Anthropozoologica, 44, 35–56.
Slavin, P. (2010), ‘Goose management and rearing in late medieval eastern England, c.1250–1400’, Agricultural History Review, 58, 1–29.
Smith, A. [1776] (1880), The wealth of nations, vol. I, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Smith, R. M. (1979), ‘Some reflections on the evidence for the origins of the “European marriage pattern” in England’, Sociological Review Monograph, 28, 74–112.
Smith, R. M. (1988), ‘Human resources’, 188–212 in Astill, G. and Grant, A. (eds.), The countryside of medieval England, Oxford: Blackwell.
Smith, R. M. (2012), ‘Measuring adult mortality in an age of plague: England, 1349–1540’, 43–85 in Bailey, M. and Rigby, S. H. (eds.), Town and countryside in the age of the Black Death: essays in honour of John Hatcher, Turnhout: Brepols.
Snooks, G. D. (1995), ‘The dynamic role of the market in the Anglo-Norman economy and beyond, 1086–1300’, 27–54 in Britnell, R. H. and Campbell, B. M. S. (eds.), A commercialising economy: England 1086 to c.1300, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Spufford, M. (1984), The great reclothing of rural England: petty chapmen and their wares in the seventeenth century, London: Hambledon Press.
Stephenson, M. J. (1988), ‘Wool yields in the medieval economy’, Economic History Review, 61, 368–91.
Stone, D. J. (2006), ‘The consumption of field crops in late medieval England’, 11–26 in Woolgar, C. M., Serjeantson, D. and Waldron, A. (eds.), Food in medieval England: diet and nutrition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Stone, L. (1949), ‘Elizabethan overseas trade’, Economic History Review, 2, 30–58.
Sullivan, R. J. (1989), ‘England’s “Age of Invention”: the acceleration of patents and patentable invention during the industrial revolution’, Explorations in Economic History, 26, 424–52.
Supple, B. E. (1964), Commercial crisis and change in England, 1600–1642: a study in the instability of a mercantile economy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Tashiro, K. (1982), ‘Foreign relations during the Edo period: Sakoku re-examined’, Journal of Japanese Studies, 8, 283–306.
Thirsk, J. (1985), ‘Agricultural policy: public debate and legislation’, 298–388 in Thirsk, J. (ed.), The agrarian history of England and Wales, vol. V, 1640–1750, Part II, Agrarian change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Thompson, F. M. L. (1976), ‘Ninteenth-century horse sense’, Economic History Review, 29, 60–81.
Thompson, F. M. L. (1983), ‘Horses and hay in Britain, 1830–1918’, 50–72 in Thompson, F. M. L. (ed.), Horses in European economic history: a preliminary canter, Reading: British Agricultural History Society.
Thorold Rogers, J. E. (1866–1902), A history of agriculture and prices in England, vols. I–VI, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Thorpe, W. A. (1961), English glass, 3rd edn, London: A. and C. Black.
Thrupp, S. L. (1965), ‘The problem of replacement rates in late medieval English population’, Economic History Review, 18, 101–19.
Titow, J. Z. (1961), ‘Some evidence of thirteenth-century population growth’, Economic History Review, 14, 218–24.
Tunzelmann, G. N. von (1978), Steam power and British industrialisation to 1860, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Turner, M. E. (1981), ‘Arable in England and Wales: estimates from the 1801 crop return’, Journal of Historical Geography, 7, 291–302.
Turner, M. E. (1998), ‘Counting sheep: waking up to new estimates of livestock numbers in England’, Agricultural History Review, 46, 142–61.
Turner, M. E.; Beckett, J. V.; and Afton, B. (2001), Farm production in England 1700–1914, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Vancouver, C. (1808), General view of agriculture of the county of Devon: drawn up for the consideration of the Board of Agriculture, London: Richard Phillips.
Voigtländer, N.; and Voth, H.-J. (2013), ‘How the West “invented” fertility restriction’, American Economic Review, 103, 2227–64.
Voth, H.-J. (1998), ‘Time and work in eighteenth-century London’, Journal of Economic History, 58, 29–58.
Voth, H.-J. (2001), ‘The longest years: new estimates of labor input in England, 1760–1830’, Journal of Economic History, 61, 1065–82.
Voth, H.-J. (2004), ‘Living standards and the urban environment’, 268–94 in Floud, R. and Johnson, P. (eds.), The Cambridge economic history of modern Britain, vol. I, Industrialisation, 1700–1860, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Vries, J. (1984), European urbanization 1500–1800, London: Methuen.
Vries, J. (1994), ‘The industrial revolution and the industrious revolution’, Journal of Economic History, 54, 249–70.
Vries, J. (2008), The industrious revolution: consumer behavior and the household economy, 1650 to the present, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Walker, J. T. (2008), ‘National income in Domesday England’, Discussion Paper em-dp2008-67, Henley Business School, University of Reading.
Wallerstein, I. (1980), The modern world-system, vol. II, Mercantilism and the consolidation of the European world-economy, 1600–1750, London: Academic Press.
Weatherill, L. (1983), ‘The growth of the pottery industry in England, 1660–1815’, Post Medieval Archaeology, 17, 15–46.
Weatherill, L. (1988), Consumer behaviour and material culture in Britain, 1660–1760, London: Routledge.
Weber, M. (1930), The protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism, London: Allen and Unwin.
Weir, D. R. (1998), ‘Malthus’s theory of population’, 290–93 in Eatwell, J. and Milgate, M. (eds.), The new Palgrave: a dictionary of economics, London: Macmillan.
Williamson, T. (2010), ‘The origins of “champion” landscapes in midland England: new evidence from Northamptonshire’, unpublished paper presented at the conference ‘Rural history 2010’, University of Sussex, 13 September 2010.
Woolgar, C. M.; Serjeantson, D.; and Waldron, T. (2006), ‘Introduction’, 1–8 in Woolgar, C. M., Serjeantson, D. and Waldron, T. (eds.), Food in medieval England: diet and nutrition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Wrigley, E. A. (1967), ‘A simple model of London’s importance in changing English society and economy 1650–1750’, Past and Present, 37, 44–70.
Wrigley, E. A. (1985), ‘Urban growth and agricultural change: England and the Continent in the early modern period’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 15, 683–728.
Wrigley, E. A. (2000), ‘The divergence of England: the growth of the English economy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 6th series, 10, 117–41.
Wrigley, E. A. (2004), Poverty, progress and population, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wrigley, E. A. (2006a), ‘Categorising occupations: the primary, secondary, tertiary (PST) system’, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, .
Wrigley, E. A. (2006b), ‘The transition to an advanced organic economy: half a millennium of English agriculture’, Economic History Review 59, 435–80.
Wrigley, E. A. (2009), ‘Rickman revisited: the population growth rates of English counties in the early modern period’, Economic History Review, 62, 711–35.
Wrigley, E. A. (2011), The early English censuses, British Academy Records of Social and Economic History, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Wrigley, E. A.; and Schofield, R. S. (1989), The population history of England, 1541–1871: a reconstruction, revised edn, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wrigley, E. A.; Davies, R. S.; Oeppen, J. E.; and Schofield, R. S. (1997), English population history from family reconstitution, 1580–1837, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Young, C. R. (1979), The royal forests of medieval England, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Zanden, J.-L. (1995), ‘Tracing the beginning of the Kuznets curve: Western Europe during the early modern period’, Economic History Review, 48, 643–64.
Zanden, J.-L. (2009), The long road to the industrial revolution: the European economy in a global perspective, 1000–1800, Leiden: Brill.
Zanden, J.-L; and Leeuwen, B. (2012), ‘Persistent but not consistent: the growth of national income in Holland 1347–1807’, Explorations in Economic History, 49, 119–30.
Zanden, J.-L.; Buringh, E.; and Bosker, M. (2012), ‘The rise and decline of European parliaments, 1188–1789’, Economic History Review, 65, 835–61.

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed