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The Cambridge Companion to ‘Dracula'
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    The Cambridge Companion to ‘Dracula'
    • Online ISBN: 9781316597217
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316597217
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Book description

Bram Stoker's Dracula is the most famous vampire in literature and film. This new collection of sixteen essays brings together a range of internationally renowned scholars to provide a series of pathways through this celebrated Gothic novel and its innumerable adaptations and translations. The volume illuminates the novel's various pre-histories, critical contexts and subsequent cultural transformations. Chapters explore literary history, Gothic revival scholarship, folklore, anthropology, psychology, sexology, philosophy, occultism, cultural history, critical race theory, theatre and film history, and the place of the vampire in Europe and beyond. These studies provide an accessible guide of cutting-edge scholarship to one of the most celebrated modern Gothic horror stories. This Companion will serve as a key resource for scholars, teachers and students interested in the enduring force of Dracula and the seemingly inexhaustible range of the contexts it requires and readings it might generate.

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Herbert Christopher. ‘Vampire Religion’, Representations 79 (2002), 100–27.
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Linneman Laura. ‘The Fear of Castration and Male Dread of Female Sexuality: The Theme of the “Vagina Dentata” in Dracula’, Journal of Dracula Studies 12 (2010), 1128.
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Schaffer Talia. ‘“A Wilde Desire Took Me”: The Homoerotic History of Dracula’, ELH 61, no. 2 (1994), 381425.
Senf Carol, ‘Stoker’s Response to the New Woman’, Victorian Studies 26 (1982), 3349.
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Sparks Tabitha. ‘Medical Gothic and the Return of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Stoker and Machen’, Nineteenth-Century Feminisms 6 (2002), 87102.
Stevenson John Allen. ‘A Vampire in the Mirror: The Sexuality of Dracula’, PMLA 103, no. 2 (1988), 139–49.
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Wicke Jennifer. ‘Vampiric Typewriting: Dracula and its Media’, ELH 59, no. 2 (1992), 467–93.
Zanger Jules. ‘A Sympathetic Vibration: Dracula and the Jews’, English Literature in Transition 34, no. 1 (1991), 3344.
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Case Sue-Ellen. ‘Tracking the Vampire’, Differences 3 (1991), 120.
Craft Christopher, ‘“Kiss Me with Those Red Lips”: Gender and Inversion in Bram Stoker’s Dracula’, Representations 8 (1984), 107–33.
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