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The Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington
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    The Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington
    • Online ISBN: 9781139021357
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781139021357
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Book description

Duke Ellington is widely held to be the greatest jazz composer and one of the most significant cultural icons of the twentieth century. This comprehensive and accessible Companion is the first collection of essays to survey, in depth, Ellington's career, music, and place in popular culture. An international cast of authors includes renowned scholars, critics, composers, and jazz musicians. Organized in three parts, the Companion first sets Ellington's life and work in context, providing new information about his formative years, method of composing, interactions with other musicians, and activities abroad; its second part gives a complete artistic biography of Ellington; and the final section is a series of specific musical studies, including chapters on Ellington and song-writing, the jazz piano, descriptive music, and the blues. Featuring a chronology of the composer's life and major recordings, this book is essential reading for anyone with an interest in Ellington's enduring artistic legacy.

Reviews

‘This volume offers a treasure trove for musicologists. Though the depth of its entries ranges widely, several chapters constitute major contributions to musicology, on a par with the level of original research and interpretation ordinarily reserved for doctoral theses. It also features an excellent bibliography of selected readings and a comprehensive index.’

Mark Gridley Source: Music Reference Services Quarterly

'Essential reading - addressed to anyone who wants to deepen his knowledge of one of the most significant cultural icons of the twentieth century.'

Danny Camerlengo Source: Suono (Italy)

‘For the Ellington fan, the Ellington scholar, for anyone remotely interested in learning more about the man whom Green quite rightly calls 'America’s greatest composer', The Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington is indispensable.’

Mick Carlon Source: JazzTimes

'The book is extraordinary indeed!'

Thomas Riis - Director of the American Music Research Center, University of Colorado

'[I] couldn’t stop reading it. I am glad it has been published and the book can be recommended highly.'

Louis Tavecchio - Universiteit van Amsterdam

'This Cambridge Companion helps the reader see two divide-and-conquer approaches to his artistic oeuvre: by decade, and by genres such as suites, songs, and the blues. Elling-tonians and professors will read this book from cover to cover, and students needing material for jazz term papers will be thankful for the analyses of individual pieces that are embedded in some of the essays.'

Edward Komara Source: Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

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Select bibliography

It would be impossible to list here the thousands of magazine and newspaper articles, liner notes, reviews, oral history sources, and websites of interest to Ellington scholars and fans. However, special mention should be made of the collection of online links at http://ellingtonweb.ca. The holdings of the Duke Ellington Collection at the Smithsonian Institution are itemized at http://americanhistory.si.edu/archives/d5301.htm.

Books and dissertations

Bigard, Barney. With Louis and the Duke: The Autobiography of a Jazz Clarinetist. Edited by Barry Martyn. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
Cohen, Harvey G.Duke Ellington’s America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.
Collier, James Lincoln. Duke Ellington. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.
Cooper, Matthew J.Duke Ellington as Pianist: A Study of Styles. Missoula, MT: The College Music Society (Monographs & Bibliographics in Music, 24), 2013.
Dance, Stanley. The World of Duke Ellington. New York: Scribner, 1970; reprint, New York: Da Capo, 1981.
Dance, Stanley. The World of Swing. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons, 1974; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1979.
Denning, Michael. The Cultural Front: The Laboring of American Culture in the Twentieth Century. New York: Verso, 2000.
Dietrich, Kurt. Duke’s Bones: Ellington’s Great Trombonists. RottenburgN., Germany: Advance Music, 1995.
Dinerstein, Joel. Swinging the Machine: Modernity, Technology, and African-American Culture between the World Wars. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2003.
Ellington, Duke [Edward Kennedy]. Music Is My Mistress. New York: Doubleday, 1973; reprint, New York: Da Capo, 1976. An index to this book can be found online at http://roundaboutjazz.de/depages/IndexToMiMM.htm.
Ellington, Mercer, with Stanley Dance. Duke Ellington in Person: An Intimate Memoir. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1978; reprint, New York: Da Capo, 1979.
Erenberg, Lewis A.Swingin’ the Dream: Big Band Jazz and the Rebirth of American Culture. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1998.
Faine, Edward Allan. Ellington at the White House 1969. Takoma Park, MD: IM Press, 2013.
Franceschina, John. Duke Ellington’s Music for the Theatre. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2001.
Gammond, Peter, ed. Duke Ellington: His Life and Music. New York: Roy Publishers, 1958; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1977.
George, Don. Sweet Man: The Real Duke Ellington. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1981.
Hajdu, David. Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1996.
Haskins, Jim. The Cotton Club. New York: Random House, 1977.
Hasse, John Edward. Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.
Howland, John, ed. Duke Ellington Studies (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, scheduled for 2015).
Howland, John, Ellington Uptown: Duke Ellington, James P. Johnson, and the Birth of Concert Jazz. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009.
Jewell, Derek. Duke: A Portrait of Duke Ellington. Toronto: George J. McLeod, 1977; reprint, New York: W. W. Norton, 1980.
Knauer, Wolfram, ed. Duke Ellington und die Folgen. Hofheim, Germany: Wolke Verlag, 2000. [All essays in German.]
Lambert, Eddie. Duke Ellington: A Listener’s Guide. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 1999.
Lavezzoli, Peter. The King of All, Sir Duke: Ellington and the Artistic Revolution. New York: Continuum, 2001.
Lawrence, A. H.Duke Ellington and His World: A Biography. New York: Routledge, 2001.
Lock, Graham. Blutopia: Visions of the Future and Revisions of the Past in the Work of Sun Ra, Duke Ellington, and Anthony Braxton. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1999.
McLaren, Joseph. “Edward Kennedy (Duke) Ellington and Langston Hughes: Perspectives on Their Contributions to American Culture, 1920–1966.” PhD diss., Brown University, 1980.
Morton, John Fass. Backstory in Blue: Ellington at Newport ’56. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2008.
Nicholson, Stuart. Reminiscing in Tempo: A Portrait of Duke Ellington. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1999.
Peress, Maurice. Dvořák to Duke Ellington: A Conductor Explores America’s Music and Its African American Roots. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.
Rattenbury, Ken. Duke Ellington: Jazz Composer. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990.
Schiff, David. The Ellington Century. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012.
Steed, Janna Tull. Duke Ellington: A Spiritual Biography. New York: Crossroad, 1999.
Stewart, Rex. Boy Meets Horn. Edited by Claire P. Gordon. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1991.
Stratemann, Klaus. Duke Ellington: Day by Day and Film by Film. Copenhagen: JazzMedia, 1992.
Teachout, Terry. Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington. New York: Gotham Books, 2013.
Timner, W. E.Ellingtonia: The Recorded Music of Duke Ellington and His Sidemen. 5th edn. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2007.
Tucker, Mark, ed. The Duke Ellington Reader. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
Tucker, Mark, Ellington: The Early Years. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1991.
Ulanov, Barry. Duke Ellington. New York: Creative Age Press, 1946; reprint, New York: Da Capo, 1972.
Vail, Ken. Duke’s Diary: The Life of Duke Ellington, Part One; 1927–1950. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 1999.
Vail, Ken.Duke’s Diary: The Life of Duke Ellington, Part Two; 1950–1974. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2002.
van de Leur, Walter. Something to Live For: The Music of Billy Strayhorn. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Book chapters and journal articles

Balliett, Whitney. “Celebrating the Duke.” In Collected Works. A Journal of Jazz 1954–2000, 806–12. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000.
Balliett, Whitney. “A Day with the Duke.” In American Musicians: 56 Portraits in Jazz, 319–23. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
Balliett, Whitney. “Duke Ellington.” In Goodbyes and Other Messages: A Journal of Jazz, 1981–1990, 23–30. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
Bañagale, Ryan Paul. “Rewriting the Narrative One Arrangement at a Time: Duke Ellington and Rhapsody in Blue.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 5–27.
Barg, Lisa, and Walter van de Leur. “‘Your Music Has Flung the Story of “Hot Harlem” to the Four Corners of the Earth!’: Race and Narrative in Black, Brown and Beige.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 426–58.
Baumgartner, Michael. “Duke Ellington’s ‘East St. Louis Toodle-O’ Revisited.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 29–56.
Bellerby, Vic. “Duke Ellington.” In The Art of Jazz: Ragtime to Bebop, edited by Martin T. Williams, 139–59. New York: Oxford University Press, 1959; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1981.
Berish, Andrew. “Leisure, Love, and Dreams in Depression America: Duke Ellington and Tin Pan Alley Song.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 339–68.
Berish, Andrew. “A Locomotive Laboratory of Place: Duke Ellington and His Orchestra.” In Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams: Place, Mobility, and Race in Jazz of the 1930s and ’40s. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012.
Burrows, George. “Black, Brown and Beige and the Politics of Signifyin(g): Towards a Critical Understanding of Duke Ellington.” Jazz Research Journal 1 (May 2007): 45–71.
Caine, Daniel C.A Crooked Thing: A Chronicle of ‘Beggar’s Holiday’.” New Renaissance 7/1 (Spring 1987): 75–100.
Charters, Samuel B., and Leonard Kunstadt. “The House That Mills Built.” In Jazz: A History of the New York Scene, 207–21. New York: Doubleday, 1962; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1981.
Cohen, Harvey G.Duke Ellington and Black, Brown and Beige: The Composer as Historian at Carnegie Hall.” American Quarterly 56/4 (Dec 2004): 1003–34.
Cohen, Harvey G.Duke Ellington on Film in the 1930s.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 406–25.
Cohen, Harvey G.The Marketing of Duke Ellington: Setting the Strategy for an African American Maestro.” The Journal of African American History 89/4 (Autumn 2004): 291–315.
Cooke, Mervyn. “Jazz Among the Classics, and the Case of Duke Ellington.” In The Cambridge Companion to Jazz, edited by Mervyn Cooke and David Horn, 153–73. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Cox, Felix. “Duke Ellington as Composer: Two Pieces for Paul Whiteman.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 57–74.
Crawford, Richard. “Duke Ellington (1899–1974) and His Orchestra.” In The American Musical Landscape: The Business of Musicianship from Billings to Gershwin, 184–212. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.
Crouch, Stanley. “Duke Ellington: Transcontinental Swing” and “Come Sunday: Duke Ellington, Mahalia Jackson.” In Considering Genius: Writings on Jazz, 133–52, 258–70. New York: Basic Civitas Books, 2006.
Davis, Francis. “Surviving Ellington” [subject: Queenie Pie] and “Ellington’s Decade.” In Jazz and Its Discontents: A Francis Davis Reader, 55–67, 68–75. New York: Da Capo Press, 2004.
DeVeaux, Scott. “Black, Brown and Beige and the Critics.” Black Music Research Journal 13/2 (Fall 1993): 125–46.
Dietrich, Kurt. “Joe ‘Tricky Sam’ Nanton: Duke Ellington’s Master of the Plunger Trombone.” Annual Review of Jazz Studies 5 (1991): 1–35.
Dietrich, Kurt. “The Role of Trombones in Black, Brown and Beige.” Black Music Research Journal 13/2 (Fall 1993): 111–24.
Domek, Richard. “Compositional Characteristics of Later Ellington Works.” Jazz Research Proceedings Yearbook [IAJE] 19 (1999): 127–45.
Domek, Richard. “The Duke as Impressionist: Another Look.” Jazz Research Papers [IAJE] 14 (1994): 55–64.
Domek, Richard. “Ellington’s Development as a Background Artist.” Jazz Research Proceedings Yearbook [IAJE] 17 (1997): 6–29.
Domek, Richard. “The Late Duke: Ellington’s and Strayhorn’s Music for Anatomy of a Murder Considered.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 75–121.
Edström, Olle. “Ellington in Sweden.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 478–512.
Edwards, Brent Hayes. “The Literary Ellington.” Representations 77 (Winter 2002): 1–29. Reprinted in Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies, edited by Robert G. O’Meally et al. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
Ellison, Ralph. “Homage to Duke Ellington on His Birthday.” Washington Sunday Star, April 27, 1969. Reprinted in Living with Music: Ralph Ellison’s Jazz Writings, edited by Robert G. O’Meally. New York: Modern Library, 2001.
Feather, Leonard. “The Duke.” In From Satchmo to Miles, 45–64. New York: Da Capo Press, 1972.
Feather, Leonard. “Duke.” In The Jazz Years: Earwitness to an Era, 62–70. New York: Da Capo Press, 1987.
Feather, Leonard. “Duke Ellington.” In The Jazz Makers: Essays on the Greats of Jazz, edited by Nat Shapiro and Nat Hentoff, 187–201. New York: Rinehart, 1957; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1979.
Fitzgerald, Sharon. “To Love Him Madly.” American Visions 14/2 (April 1999): 16–25.
Fox, Charles. “Duke Ellington in the Nineteen-Thirties.” In The Art of Jazz: Ragtime to Bebop, edited by Martin T. Williams, 123–38. New York: Oxford University Press, 1959; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1981.
Gabbard, Krin. “Duke’s Place: Visualizing a Jazz Composer.” In Jammin’ at the Margins: Jazz and the American Cinema, 160–203. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.
Gabbard, Krin. “Paris Blues: Ellington, Armstrong, and Saying It with Music.” In Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies, edited by Robert G. O’Meally et al., 297–311. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
Gaffney, Nicholas L.‘He Was a Man Who Walked Tall Among Men’: Duke Ellington, African American Audiences, and the Black Musical Entertainment Market, 1927–1943.” The Journal of African American History 98/3 (Summer 2013): 367–91.
Gaines, Kevin. “Duke Ellington, ‘Black, Brown, and Beige,’ and the Cultural Politics of Race.” In Music and the Racial Imagination, edited by Ronald Radano and Philip V. Bohlman, 585–602. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
Giddins, Gary. “Duke Ellington: The Poker Game,” “Duke Ellington: The Enlightenment,” and “Duke Ellington: At the Pulpit.” In Visions of Jazz: The First Century, 102–17, 233–52, 490–501. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
Giddins, Gary. “Not for Dancers Only.” In Rhythm-a-Ning: Jazz Tradition and Innovation in the ’80s, 250–59. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.
Gleason, Ralph J.The Duke.” In Celebrating the Duke, 153–266. Boston: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1975.
Green, Edward. “Did Ellington Truly Believe in an Afro-Eurasian Eclipse?International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 43/1 (2012): 227–35.
Green, Edward. “Duke Ellington and the Oneness of Opposites: A Study in the Art of Motivic Composition.” Ongakugaku (Journal of the Musicological Society of Japan) 53/1 (2007): 1–18.
Green, Edward. “‘Harlem Air Shaft’: A True Programmatic Composition?Journal of Jazz Studies 7/1 (2011): 28–46.
Green, Edward. “‘It Don’t Mean a Thing if It Ain’t Got That Grundgestalt!’ – Ellington from a Motivic Perspective.” Jazz Perspectives 2/2 (2008): 215–49.
Harrison, Max. “Reflections on Some of Duke Ellington’s Longer Work.” In A Jazz Retrospect, 121–27. London: Quartet, 1991.
Hasse, John. “‘A New Reason for Living’: Duke Ellington in France.” Nottingham French Studies 43/1 (Spring 2004): 5–18.
Hentoff, Nat. “Diminuendo and Crescendo in Blue” [six articles on Ellington]. In Listen to the Stories: Nat Hentoff on Jazz and Country Music, 3–24. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.
Hentoff, Nat. “The Man Who Was an Orchestra.” In Jazz Is, 21–39. New York: Random House, 1976.
Hodeir, André. “A Masterpiece: Concerto for Cootie.” In Jazz: Its Evolution and Essence, 77–98. New York: Grove Press, 1956.
Hoefsmit, Sjef. “Chronology of Ellington’s Recordings and Performances of Black, Brown and Beige, 1943–1973.” Edited by Andrew Homzy. Black Music Research Journal 13/2 (Fall 1993): 161–73.
Homzy, Andrew. “Black, Brown and Beige in Duke Ellington’s Repertoire, 1943–1973.” Black Music Research Journal 13/2 (Fall 1993): 87–110.
Horricks, Raymond. “Classic Ellington.” In Profiles in Jazz, 55–91. New York: Transaction, 1991.
Howland, John. “Ellingtonia, Historically Speaking.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 331–38.
Howland, John. “Ellingtonian Extended Composition and the Symphonic Jazz Model.” Annual Review of Jazz Studies 14 (2009): 1–64.
Hudson, Theodore R.Duke Ellington’s Literary Sources.” American Music 9/1 (Spring 1991): 20–42.
Jackson, Travis A.Tourist Point of View? Musics of the World and Ellington’s Suites.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 513–40.
Jaffe, Andy. “An Overview of Duke Ellington Composition Techniques.” Jazz Research Papers [IAJE] 16 (1996): 71–90.
James, Burnett. “Johnny Hodges,” “The Impressionism of Duke Ellington,” and “‘Such Sweet Thunder’.” In Essays on Jazz. London: Sidgwick and Jackson, 1961; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1990.
Johnson, Aaron J.A Date with the Duke: Ellington on Radio.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 369–405.
Knauer, Wolfram. “‘Simulated Improvisation’ in Duke Ellington’s Black, Brown and Beige.” The Black Perspective in Music 18 (1990): 20–38.
Lees, Gene. “The Enigma: Duke Ellington.” In Meet Me at Jim & Andy’s: Jazz Musicians and Their World, 45–57. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
Levine, Mark. “Notes on Ellington. The Clave and Piano Strategies.” Musica Oggi 19 (1999): 18–22.
Lomanno, Mark. “Ellington’s Lens as Motive Mediating: Improvising Voices in TheFar East Suite.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 151–77.
Lyttelton, Humphrey. “Duke Ellington.” In The Best of Jazz, 143–52. London: Robson, 1978; reprint, New York: Taplinger, 1982.
Marsalis, Wynton, and Robert G. O’Meally. “Duke Ellington: ‘Music Like a Big Hot Pot of Good Gumbo’.” In The Jazz Cadence of American Culture, edited by Robert G. O’Meally, 143–53. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998.
Martin, Henry. “From Fountain to Furious: Ellington’s Development as Stride Pianist.” Musica Oggi 23 (2003–2004): 55–68.
McCarthy, Albert. “Duke Ellington: Apex of the Big Band Tradition.” In Big Band Jazz, 328–46. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1974.
McManus, Laurie. “Ambiguity of Identity in the ‘Global Village’: Ellington, McLuhan, and TheAfro-Eurasian Eclipse.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 179–96.
Metzer, David. “Shadow Play: The Spiritual in Duke Ellington’s Black and Tan Fantasy.” Black Music Research Journal 17/2 (Autumn 1997): 137–58.
Morgenstern, Dan. “The Duke and His Men.” In Jazz People, 99–124. New York: H. Abrams, 1976; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1993.
Morgenstern, Dan. Living With Jazz: A Reader. Edited by Sheldon Meyer. New York: Pantheon, 2004. Contains twelve pieces on Ellington.
Murray, Albert. “Duke Ellington Vamping Till Ready,” “The Vernacular Imperative,” “Storiella Americana as She Is Swyung: Or, The Blues as Representative Anecdote,” and “Armstrong and Ellington Stomping the Blues in Paris.” In The Blue Devils of Nada, 21–28, 75–82, 83–96, 97–113. New York: Vintage, 1996.
Peress, Maurice. “My Life with Black, Brown and Beige.” Black Music Research Journal 13/2 (Fall 1993): 147–60.
Priestley, Brian, and Alan Cohen. “Black, Brown, and Beige.” Composer 51 (1974): 33–37; 52 (1974): 29–32; 53 (1974–1975): 29–32. Revised edition in Tucker, ed., TheDuke EllingtonReader.
Roeder, Michael Thomas. “Ellington Exposed: Back to Back and Side by Side.” Annual Review of Jazz Studies 9 (1997–1998): 339–49.
Schiff, David. “Symphonic Ellington? Rehearing New World A-Comin’.” Musical Quarterly 96 (2013): 459–77.
Schuller, Gunther. “Duke Ellington: Master Composer.” In The Swing Era: The Development of Jazz 1930–1945, 46–157. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
Schuller, Gunther. “Ellington in the Pantheon,” “Ellington vis-à-vis the Swing Era,” and “The Case for Ellington’s Music as Living Repertory.” In Musings: The Musical Worlds of Gunther Schuller, 47–50, 51–59, 60–64. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1999.
Schuller, Gunther. “The Ellington Style: Its Origins and Early Development.” In Early Jazz: Its Roots and Musical Development, 318–57. New York: Oxford University Press, 1968.
Shapiro, Nat, and Nat Hentoff, eds. “Ellington Plays the Piano, But His Real Instrument Is His Band.” In Hear Me Talkin’ To Ya, 224–38. New York: Rinehart, 1955.
Simon, George T.Duke Ellington.” In The Big Bands, 187–96. New York: Macmillan, 1967.
Stewart, Rex. “Ellingtonia.” In Jazz Masters of the Thirties, 80–142. New York: Macmillan, 1972; reprint, Da Capo Press, 1982.
Teal, Kimberley Hannon. “Beyond the Cotton Club: The Persistence of Duke Ellington’s Jungle Style.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 123–49.
Tucker, Mark. “Duke Ellington.” In The Oxford Companion to Jazz, edited by Bill Kirchner, 132–47. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.
Tucker, Mark. “The Genesis of Black, Brown and Beige.” Black Music Research Journal 13/2 (Fall 1993): 67–86.
Ulanov, Barry. “The Ellington Programme.” In The Jazz Cadence of American Culture, edited by Robert G. O’Meally, 166–71. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998.
Vogel, Shane. “Madam Zajj and US Steel: Blackness, Bioperformance, and Duke Ellington’s Calypso Theater.” Social Text 30/4 (Winter 2012): 1–24.
Wall, Tim. “Duke Ellington, Radio Remotes, and the Mediation of Big City Nightlife, 1927 to 1933.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 197–222.
Ward, Geoffrey. “Like His Music, The Duke Was Beyond Category.” Smithsonian 24/2 (May 1993): 62–71.
Waters, Charles H., Jr.Anatomy of a Cover: The Story of Duke Ellington’s Appearance on the Cover of Time Magazine.” Annual Review of Jazz Studies 6 (1993): 1–46.
Welburn, Ron. “Duke Ellington’s Music: The Catalyst for a True Jazz Criticism.” International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 17/1 (June 1986): 111–22.
Wiedemann, Erik. “Duke Ellington: The Composer.” Annual Review of Jazz Studies 5 (1991): 37–64.
Willard, Patricia. “Dance: The Unsung Element of Ellingtonia.” The Antioch Review 57/3 (Summer 1999): 402–14.
Williams, J. Kent. “Hodges at Newport: The Rhetoric of ‘Jeep’s Blues’.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 247–63.
Williams, Katherine. “Improvisation as Composition: Fixity of Form and Collaborative Composition in Duke Ellington’s Diminuendo and Crescendo in Blue.” Jazz Perspectives 6/1–2 (2012): 223–46.
Williams, Martin. “Duke Ellington: Form Beyond Form.” In The Jazz Tradition, 100–21. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.
Zenni, Stefano. “The Aesthetics of Duke Ellington’s Suites: The Case of ‘Togo Brava’.” Black Music Research Journal 21/1 (Spring 2001): 1–28.

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