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The Cambridge Companion to Galileo
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  • Cited by 9
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Kinzel, Katherina and Kusch, Martin 2018. De-idealizing Disagreement, Rethinking Relativism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 26, Issue. 1, p. 40.

    Clement, John J. 2018. Reasoning Patterns in Galileo’s Analysis of Machines and in Expert Protocols: Roles for Analogy, Imagery, and Mental Simulation. Topoi,

    Ghassib, Hisham 2012. A Theory of the Knowledge Industry. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 26, Issue. 4, p. 447.

    Rowe, David E. 2012. Einstein and Relativity: What Price Fame?. Science in Context, Vol. 25, Issue. 02, p. 197.

    MACHAMER, PETER MCGUIRE, J. E. and KOCHIRAS, HYLARIE 2012. NEWTON AND THE MECHANICAL PHILOSOPHY: GRAVITATION AS THE BALANCE OF THE HEAVENS. The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 50, Issue. 3, p. 370.

    Seker, Hayati and Guney, Burcu G. 2012. History of Science in the Physics Curriculum: A Directed Content Analysis of Historical Sources. Science & Education, Vol. 21, Issue. 5, p. 683.

    Rennie, Bryan 2009. Editorial. Religion, Vol. 39, Issue. 4, p. 317.

    Zakai, Avihu 2007. The Rise of Modern Science and the Decline of Theology as the ‘Queen of Sciences’ in the Early Modern Era. Reformation & Renaissance Review, Vol. 9, Issue. 2, p. 125.

    Hinzen, Wolfram 2006. Internalism about truth. Mind & Society, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, p. 139.

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Book description

Not only a hero of the scientific revolution, but after his conflict with the church, a hero of science, Galileo is today rivalled in the popular imagination only by Newton and Einstein. But what did Galileo actually do, and what are the sources of the popular image we have of him? This 1998 collection of specially-commissioned essays is unparalleled in the depth of its coverage of all facets of Galileo's work. A particular feature of the volume is the treatment of Galileo's relationship with the church. It will be of interest to philosophers, historians of science, cultural historians and those in religious studies.

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