Skip to main content
×
×
Home
The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability
    • Online ISBN: 9781316104316
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316104316
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

This Companion analyzes the representation of disability in literatures in English, including American and postcolonial writing, across all major time periods and through a variety of critical approaches. Through the alternative ideas of mind and embodiment generated by physiological and psychological impairments, an understanding of disability narrative changes the way we read literature. With contributions from major figures in literary disability studies, The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability covers a wide range of impairments, including cognitive difference, neurobehavioral conditions, and mental and chronic illnesses. This book shows how disability demands innovation in literary form and aesthetics, challenges the notion of a human 'norm' in the writing of character, and redraws the ways in which writing makes meaning of the broad spectrum of humanity. It will be a key resource for students and teachers of disability and literary studies.

Reviews

'… an excellent collection of writing on representation.'

Amanda Tink Source: Sydney Review of Books

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×
Recommended Reading
Allan, Kathryn (ed.), Disability in Science Fiction: Representations of Technology as Cure (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).
Antebi, Susan, Carnal Inscriptions: Spanish American Narratives of Corporeal Difference and Disability (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).
Baldys, Emily M., “Disabled Sexuality, Incorporated,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 6.2 (2012), 125–41.
Barker, Clare, “Disability and the Postcolonial Novel,” in The Cambridge Companion to the Postcolonial Novel, ed. by Quayson, Ato (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), pp. 99–115.
Barker, Clare, Postcolonial Fiction and Disability: Exceptional Children, Metaphor, and Materiality (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).
Barker, Clare, and Murray, Stuart (eds.), “Disabling Postcolonialism,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 4.3 (2010).
Barker, Clare, and Murray, Stuart (eds.), “Disabling Postcolonialism: Global Disability Cultures and Democratic Criticism,” in The Disability Studies Reader, edn., ed. by Davis, Lennard J. (New York and London: Routledge, 2013), pp. 61–73.
Bar-Yosef, Eitan, “The ‘Deaf Traveller’, the ‘Blind Traveller’, and the Constructions of Disability in Nineteenth-Century Travel Writing,” Victorian Review, 35.2 (2009), 133–54.
Bell, Chris (ed.), Blackness and Disability: Critical Examinations and Cultural Interventions (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2011).
Bell, Chris, (ed.), “Introducing White Disability Studies: A Modest Proposal,” in The Disability Studies Reader, edn., ed. by Davis, Lennard J. (New York: Routledge, 2006), pp. 275–82.
Bolaki, Stella, and Gair, Chris (eds.), “Disability and the American Counterculture,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 9.2 (2015).
Bolt, David, The Metanarrative of Blindness: A Re-Reading of Twentieth-Century Anglophone Writing (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013).
Bolt, David, and Penketh, Claire (eds.), Disability, Avoidance and the Academy: Challenging Resistance (Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2016).
Bolt, David, Rodas, Julia Miele, and Donaldson, Elizabeth (eds.), The Madwoman and the Blindman: Jane Eyre, Discourse, Disability (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2012).
Bourrier, Karen, The Measure of Manliness: Disability and Masculinity in the Mid-Victorian Novel (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2015).
Bradshaw, Michael (ed.), Disabling Romanticism: Body, Mind, and Text (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).
Bragg, Lois, Oedipus Borealis: The Aberrant Body in Old Icelandic Myth and Saga (Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2004).
Brueggemann, Brenda Jo, and Fredal, James A., “Studying Disability Rhetorically,” in Disability Discourse, ed. by Corker, Mairian and French, Sally (Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press, 1999), pp. 129–35.
Burke, Lucy (ed.), “The Representation of Cognitive Impairment,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 2.1 (2008).
Campbell, Fiona Kumari, Contours of Ableism: The Production of Disability and Abledness (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).
Chen, Mel Y., Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012).
Cheyne, Ria, “Disability Studies Reads the Romance,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 7.1 (2013), 37–52.
Cheyne, Ria, (ed.), “Popular Genres and Disability Representation,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 6.2 (2012).
Cheyne, Ria, (ed.), “‘She Was Born a Thing’: Disability, the Cyborg and the Posthuman in Anne McCaffrey's The Ship Who Sang ,” Journal of Modern Literature, 36.3 (2013), 138–56.
Cho, Sumi, Crenshaw, Kimberlé Williams, and McCall, Leslie (eds.), “Intersectionality: Theorizing Power, Empowering Theory,” special issue of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 38.4 (2013).
Clare, Eli, Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation (Boston: South End Press, 1999).
Coogan, Tom, and Mallett, Rebecca (eds.), “Disability, Humour, and Comedy,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 7.3 (2013).
Couser, G. Thomas (ed.), “Disability and Life Writing,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 5.3 (2011).
Couser, G. Thomas (ed.), “Quality-of-Life Writing: Illness, Disability, and Representation,” in Fuchs, Miriam and Howes, Craig (eds.), Teaching Life Writing Texts (New York: Modern Language Association, 2008), pp. 350–58.
Couser, G. Thomas (ed.), Recovering Bodies: Illness, Disability, and Life Writing (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997).
Couser, G. Thomas (ed.), Signifying Bodies: Disability in Contemporary Life Writing (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009).
Couser, G. Thomas (ed.), Vulnerable Subjects: Ethics and Life Writing (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004).
Craps, Stef, Postcolonial Witnessing: Trauma Out of Bounds (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).
Daston, Lorraine, and Park, Katharine, Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150–1750 (New York and Cambridge, MA: Zone Books, 1998).
Davidson, Iain F. W. K., Woodill, Gary, and Bredberg, Elizabeth, “Images of Disability in 19th Century British Children's Literature,” Disability and Society, 9.1 (1994), 33–46.
Davidson, Michael, Concerto for the Left Hand: Disability and the Defamiliar Body (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008).
Davidson, Michael (ed.), “Disability and the Dialectic of Dependency,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 1.2 (2007).
Davies, Jeremy, Bodily Pain in Romantic Literature (London and New York: Routledge, 2014).
Davis, Lennard J., Bending over Backwards: Disability, Dismodernism, and Other Difficult Positions (New York and London: New York University Press, 2002).
Davis, Lennard J., Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body (London: Verso, 1995).
Davis, Lennard J. (ed.), The Disability Studies Reader, edn. (New York and London: Routledge, 2017).
Davis, Lennard J. (ed.), The End of Normal: Identity in a Biocultural Era (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013).
Deutsch, Helen, and Nussbaum, Felicity (eds.), Defects: Engendering the Modern Body (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000).
Dickie, Simon, Cruelty and Laughter: Forgotten Comic Literature and the Unsentimental Eighteenth Century (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2011).
Dolmage, Jay, Disability Rhetoric (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2014).
Donaldson, Elizabeth J., “The Corpus of the Madwoman: Toward a Feminist Disability Studies Theory of Embodiment and Mental Illness,” NWSA Journal, 14.3 (2002), 99–119.
Donaldson, Elizabeth J., and Prendergast, Catherine (eds.), “Disability and Emotion,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 5.2 (2011).
Dotson, Kristie (ed.), “Interstices: Inheriting Women of Color Feminist Philosophy,” special issue of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 29.1 (2014).
Elfenbein, Andrew, “Editor's Introduction. Byron and Disability,” European Romantic Review, 12.3 (2001), 247–48.
Erevelles, Nirmala, Disability and Difference in Global Contexts (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).
Erevelles, Nirmala, “Thinking with Disability Studies,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 34.2 (2014), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/4248/3587.
Erevelles, Nirmala, and Minear, Andrea, “Unspeakable Offenses: Untangling Race and Disability in Discourses of Intersectionality,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 4.2 (2010), 127–45.
Esmail, Jennifer, Reading Victorian Deafness: Signs and Sounds in Victorian Literature and Culture (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2013).
Eyler, Joshua (ed.), Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010).
Ferris, Jim (ed.), “Disability and/as Poetry,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 1.1 (2007).
Fine, Michelle, and Asch, Adrienne (eds.), Women with Disabilities: Essays in Psychology, Culture, and Politics (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1988).
Frank, Arthur, The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1995).
Frawley, Maria, Invalidism and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Britain (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2004).
Gabbard, Christopher, “Disability Studies and the British Long Eighteenth Century,” Literature Compass, 8.2 (2011), 80–94.
Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie, “Byron and the New Disability Studies: A Response,” European Romantic Review, 12 (2001), 321–27.
Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie, Extraordinary Bodies: Figuring Physical Disability in American Culture and Literature (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997).
Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie, “Feminist Disability Studies,” Signs, 30.2 (2005), 1557–87.
Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie, “Integrating Disability, Transforming Feminist Theory,” in Feminisms Redux: An Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism, ed. by Warhol-Down, Robyn and Herndl, Diane Price (2002; New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2009), pp. 487–513.
Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie, Staring: How We Look (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2009).
Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie, “The Case for Conserving Disability,” Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, 9.3 (2012), 339–55.
Gitter, Elisabeth G., “The Blind Daughter in Charles Dickens's Cricket on the Hearth ,” Studies in English Literature, 39 (1999), 675–89.
Goffman, Erving, Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1963).
Goodey, C. F., A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability”: The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011).
Goodley, Dan, Disability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (London: SAGE, 2011).
Hacking, Ian, Mad Travelers: Reflections on the Reality of Transient Mental Illnesses (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998).
Hafferty, Frederic W., and Foster, Susan, “Decontextualizing Disability in the Crime-Mystery Genre: The Case of the Invisible Handicap,” Disability and Society, 9.2 (1994), 185–206.
Hall, Alice, Disability and Modern Fiction: Faulkner, Morrison, Coetzee and the Nobel Prize for Literature (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).
Hall, Alice, Literature and Disability (New York and London: Routledge, 2016).
Hall, Kim Q. (ed.), Feminist Disability Studies (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2011).
Heetderks, Angela, “‘Better a Witty Fool than a Foolish Wit’: Song, Fooling, and Intellectual Disability in Shakespearean Drama,” in Gender and Song in Early Modern England, ed. by Dunn, Leslie C. and Larson, Katherine R. (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014), pp. 63–75.
Hobgood, Allison, “Caesar Hath the Falling Sickness: The Legibility of Early Modern Disability in Shakespearean Drama,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 29.4 (2009), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/993/1184.
Hobgood, Allison, and Wood, David Houston (eds.), “Disabled Shakespeares,” special issue of Disability Studies Quarterly, 29.4 (2009).
Hobgood, Allison, and Wood, David Houston (eds.), Recovering Disability in Early Modern England (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2013).
Hoeniger, F. D., Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance (Newark, NJ: University of Delaware Press, 1992).
Holmes, Martha Stoddard, Fictions of Affliction: Physical Disability in Victorian Culture (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2004).
Holmes, Martha Stoddard, “Victorian Fictions of Interdependency: Gaskell, Craik, and Yonge,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 1.2 (2007), 29–41.
Hoppenstand, Gary, and Browne, Ray B., “‘I'd Kiss You Sweetheart, But My Lips Are Missing’: The Defective Detective in the Pulps,” in The Defective Detective in the Pulps, ed. by Hoppenstand, Gary and Browne, Ray B. (Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1983), pp. 1–7.
Imbracsio, Nicola M., “Stage Hands: Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and the Agency of the Disabled Body in Text and Performance,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 6.3 (2012), 291–306.
Iyengar, Sujata (ed.), Disability, Health, and Happiness in the Shakespearean Body (London: Routledge, 2015).
James, Jennifer, and Wu, Cynthia (eds.), “Race, Ethnicity, Disability, and Literature,” special issue of MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States, 31.3 (2006).
Jarman, Michelle, and Kafer, Alison, “Growing Disability Studies: Politics of Access, Politics of Collaboration,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 34.2 (2014), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/4286/3585.
Jarman, Michelle, Monaghan, Leila, and Harkin, Alison Quaggin (eds.), Barriers and Belonging: Personal Narratives of Disability (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2017).
Johnson, Merri Lisa, and McRuer, Robert (eds.), “Cripistemologies,” special issues of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 8.2–3 (2014).
Johnston, Kirsty, Disability Theatre and Modern Drama: Recasting Modernism (London: Bloomsbury, 2016).
Joshua, Essaka, “‘Blind Vacancy’: Sighted Culture and Voyeuristic Historiography in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein ,” European Romantic Review, 22.1 (2011), 49–69.
Kafer, Alison, Feminist, Queer, Crip (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2013).
Kim, Eunjung, Curative Violence: Rehabilitating Disability, Gender, and Sexuality in Modern Korea (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017).
Kleege, Georgina (ed.), “Blindness and Literature,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 3.2 (2009).
Kleinman, Arthur, The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition (New York: Basic Books, 1988).
Kuppers, Petra, Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on Edge (London: Routledge, 2003).
Kuppers, Petra, Studying Disability Arts and Culture: An Introduction (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).
Kuppers, Petra, and Overboe, James (eds.), “Deleuze, Disability, and Difference,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 3.3 (2009).
LaCom, Cindy, “‘It Is More Than Lame’: Infirmity and Maternity in Victorian Fiction,” in The Body and Physical Difference, ed. by Mitchell, David T. and Snyder, Sharon L. (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1997), pp. 189–201.
Mallett, Rebecca, and Runswick-Cole, Katherine, Approaching Disability: Critical Issues and Perspectives (London: Routledge, 2014).
Marchbanks, Paul, “From Caricature to Character: The Intellectually Disabled in Dickens's Novels,” three-part series, Dickens Quarterly, 23.1–3 (2006), 3–14, 67–84, 169–80.
McCall, Leslie, “The Complexity of Intersectionality,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 30.3 (2005), 1771–800.
McDonagh, Patrick, Idiocy: A Cultural History (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2008).
McRuer, Robert, Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability (New York and London: New York University Press, 2006).
McRuer, Robert, “Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies,” Journal of Medical Humanities, 23.3–4 (2002), 221–37.
McRuer, Robert, “Fuck the Disabled: The Prequel,” in Shakesqueer: A Queer Companion to the Complete Works of Shakespeare, ed. by Menon, Madhavi (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011), pp. 294–301.
McRuer, Robert, “Normal,” in Keywords for American Cultural Studies, edn., ed. by Burgett, Bruce and Hendler, Glenn (New York: New York University Press, 2014), pp. 184–97.
McRuer, Robert, and Mollow, Anna (eds.), Sex and Disability (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012).
McRuer, Robert, and Wilkerson, Abby L. (eds.), “Desiring Disability: Queer Theory Meets Disability Studies,” special issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 9.1–2 (2003).
Metzler, Irina, Disability in Medieval Europe: Thinking about Physical Impairment during the High Middle Ages, c. 1100–1400 (London: Routledge, 2006).
Metzler, Irina, Fools and Idiots? Intellectual Disability in the Middle Ages (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016).
Metzler, Irina, A Social History of Disability in the Middle Ages: Cultural Considerations of Physical Impairment (London: Routledge, 2015).
Mills, China, Decolonizing Global Mental Health: The Psychiatrization of the Majority World (New York: Routledge, 2013).
Minich, Julie Avril, Accessible Citizenships: Disability, Nation, and the Cultural Politics of Greater Mexico (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2015).
Mintz, Susannah B., Hurt and Pain: Literature and the Suffering Body (London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2013).
Mitchell, David T., and Snyder, Sharon L. (eds.), The Body and Physical Difference: Discourses of Disability (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1997).
Mitchell, David T., and Snyder, Sharon L. (eds.), Narrative Prosthesis: Disability and the Dependencies of Discourse (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000).
Mitchell, David T., and Snyder, Sharon L. (eds.), “Representation and Its Discontents: The Uneasy Home of Disability in Literature and Film,” in Handbook of Disability Studies, ed. by Albrecht, Gary L., Seelman, Katherine D., and Bury, Michael (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2011), pp. 195–218.
Mitchell, David T., and Snyder, Sharon L. (eds.), “Representations of Disability, History of,” in Encyclopedia of Disability, vol. 3, ed. by Albrecht, Gary L., 5 vols. (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2006), pp. 1382–94.
Mitchell, David T., with Snyder, Sharon L., The Biopolitics of Disability: Neoliberalism, Ablenationalism, and Peripheral Embodiment (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2015).
Moody, Nickianne, “Methodological Agendas: Disability-Informed Criticism and the Incidental Representation of Autism in Popular Fiction,” Popular Narrative Media, 1.1 (2008), 25–41.
Mossman, Mark, Disability, Representation and the Body in Irish Writing: 1800–1922 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).
Mossman, Mark, and Holmes, Martha Stoddard (eds.), “Critical Transformations: Disability and the Body in Nineteenth-Century Britain,” special issue of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies, 4.2 (2008).
Mossman, Mark, and Holmes, Martha Stoddard, (eds.), “Disability in Victorian Sensation Fiction,” in Blackwell Companion to Sensation Fiction, ed. by Gilbert, Pamela (London: Blackwell, 2011), pp. 493–506.
Mounsey, Chris (ed.), The Idea of Disability in the Eighteenth Century (Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2014).
Murray, Stuart, Autism (London: Routledge, 2012).
Murray, Stuart, “From Virginia's Sister to Friday's Silence: Presence, Metaphor, and the Persistence of Disability in Contemporary Writing,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 6.3 (2012), 241–58.
Murray, Stuart, “Neurotecs: Detectives, Disability and Cognitive Exceptionality in Contemporary Fiction,” in Constructing Crime: Discourse and Cultural Representations of Crime and “Deviance,” ed. by Gregoriou, Christiana (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), pp. 177–89.
Murray, Stuart, Representing Autism: Culture, Narrative, Fascination (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2008).
Nash, Jennifer, “Re-Thinking Intersectionality,” Feminist Review, 89.1 (2008), 1–15.
Nelson, Jennifer L., and Berens, Bradley S., “Spoken Daggers, Deaf Ears, and Silent Mouths: Fantasies of Deafness in Early Modern England,” in The Disability Studies Reader, edn., ed. by Davis, Lennard J. (New York: Routledge, 1997), pp. 52–74.
Newman, Sara, “Disability and Life Writing: Reports from the Nineteenth-Century Asylum,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 5.3 (2011), 261–78.
Nussbaum, Felicity, The Limits of the Human: Fictions of Anomaly, Race, and Gender in the Long Eighteenth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003).
Osteen, Mark (ed.), Autism and Representation (London: Routledge, 2008).
Parekh, Pushpa (ed.), “Intersecting Gender and Disability Perspectives in Rethinking Postcolonial Identities,” special issue of Wagadu: A Journal of Transnational Women's and Gender Studies, 4 (2007).
Paster, Gail Kern, The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993).
Paster, Gail Kern, Rowe, Katherine, and Floyd-Wilson, Mary (eds.), Reading the Early Modern Passions: Essays in the Cultural History of Emotion (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004).
Pearman, Tory Vandeventer, Women and Disability in Medieval Literature (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).
Price, Margaret, Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability and Academic Life (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2011).
Puar, Jasbir K., “‘I Would Rather Be a Cyborg Than a Goddess’: Becoming-Intersectional in Assemblage Theory,” philoSOPHIA, 2.1 (2012), 49–66.
Puar, Jasbir K., “The Cost of Getting Better: Ability and Debility,” in The Disability Studies Reader, edn., ed. by Davis, Lennard J. (New York and London: Routledge, 2013), pp. 177–84.
Quayson, Ato, Aesthetic Nervousness: Disability and the Crisis of Representation (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007).
Quayson, Ato, “Looking Awry: Tropes of Disability in Postcolonial Writing,” in Relocating Postcolonialism, ed. by Goldberg, David Theo and Quayson, Ato (Oxford: Blackwell, 2002), pp. 217–30.
Ray, Sarah Jaquette, The Ecological Other: Environmental Exclusion in American Culture (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2013).
Richardson, Kristina, Difference and Disability in the Medieval Islamic World: Blighted Bodies (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012).
Rose, Martha L., The Staff of Oedipus: Transforming Disability in Ancient Greece (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003).
Roth, Marco, “The Rise of the Neuronovel,” N+1, 8 (2009), https://nplusonemag.com/issue-8/essays/the-rise-of-the-neuronovel/.
Row-Heyveld, Lindsey, “The Lying'st Knave in Christendom: The Development of Disability in the False Miracle of St. Alban's,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 29.4 (2009), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/994/1178.
Samuels, Ellen, “Critical Divides: Judith Butler's Body Theory and the Question of Disability,” NWSA Journal, 14.3 (2002), 58–76.
Samuels, Ellen, Fantasies of Identification: Disability, Gender, Race (New York: New York University Press, 2014).
Sanchez, Rebecca, Deafening Modernism: Embodied Language and Visual Poetics in American Literature (New York: New York University Press, 2015).
Sandahl, Carrie, “Queering the Crip or Cripping the Queer?: Intersections of Queer and Crip Identities in Solo Autobiographical Performance,” GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 9.1–2 (2003), 25–56.
Sandahl, Carrie, and Auslander, Philip (eds.), Bodies in Commotion: Disability and Performance (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005).
Schaap Williams, Katherine, “Enabling Richard: The Rhetoric of Disability in Richard III ,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 29.4 (2009), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/997/1181.
Schaap Williams, Katherine, “‘More Legs than Nature Gave Thee’: Performing the Cripple in The Fair Maid of the Exchange ,” ELH, 82.2 (2015), 491–519.
Schaap Williams, Katherine, “Performing Disability and Theorizing Deformity,” English Studies, 94.7 (2013), 757–72.
Schalk, Sami, “Metaphorically Speaking: Ableist Metaphors in Feminist Writing,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 33.4 (2013), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/3874/3410.
Schalk, Sami, “Reevaluating the Supercrip,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 10.1 (2016), 71–86.
Schweik, Susan M., The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (New York: New York University Press, 2009).
Senier, Siobhan, and Barker, Clare (eds.), “Disability and Indigeneity,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 7.2 (2013).
Shakespeare, Tom, Disability Rights and Wrongs (London: Routledge, 2006).
Shakespeare, Tom, Disability Rights and Wrongs Revisited (London: Routledge, 2013).
Shakespeare, Tom, “The Social Model of Disability,” in The Disability Studies Reader, edn., ed. by Davis, Lennard J. (New York and London: Routledge, 2013), pp. 214–21.
Sherry, Mark, “(Post)colonising Disability,” Wagadu: A Journal of Transnational Women's and Gender Studies, 4 (2007), 10–22.
Shildrick, Margrit, “The Disabled Body, Genealogy and Undecidability,” Cultural Studies, 19.6 (2005), 755–70.
Siebers, Tobin, Disability Aesthetics (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2010).
Siebers, Tobin, Disability Theory (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008).
Singer, Julie, “Disability and the Social Body,” postmedieval, 3.2 (2012), 135–36.
Smith, Bonnie G., and Hutchinson, Beth (eds.), Gendering Disability (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2004).
Snyder, Sharon L., “Infinities of Forms: Disability Figures in Artistic Traditions,” in Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities, ed. by Snyder, Sharon L., Brueggemann, Brenda Jo, and Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie (New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2002), pp. 173–96.
Snyder, Sharon L., and Mitchell, David T., “Ablenationalism and the Geo-Politics of Disability,” special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 4.2 (2010).
Snyder, Sharon L., and Mitchell, David T., Cultural Locations of Disability (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2006).
Snyder, Sharon L., Brueggemann, Brenda Jo, and Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie (eds.), Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities (New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2002).
Stiker, Henri-Jacques, A History of Disability (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000).
Stirling, Jeannette, Representing Epilepsy: Myth and Matter (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2010).
Stoddard Holmes, Martha, Fictions of Affliction: Physical Disability in Victorian Culture (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2004).
Holmes, Martha Stoddard, “Victorian Fictions of Interdependency: Gaskell, Craik, and Yonge,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 1.2 (2007), 29–41.
Pierre, Joshua, “The Construction of the Disabled Speaker: Locating Stuttering in Disability Studies,” Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, 1.3 (2012), 1–21.
Thiher, Allen, Revels in Madness: Insanity in Medicine and Literature (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000).
Todd, Dennis, Imagining Monsters: Miscreations of the Self in Eighteenth-Century England (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995).
Traub, Valerie, “The Nature of Norms in Early Modern England: Anatomy, Cartography, King Lear ,” South Central Review, 26.1–2 (2009), 42–81.
Tromp, Marlene (ed.), Victorian “Freaks”: The Social Context of Freakery in the Nineteenth Century (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008).
Turner, David M., Disability in Eighteenth-Century England: Imagining Physical Impairment (New York: Routledge, 2012).
Turner, David M., and Stagg, Kevin (eds.), Social Histories of Disability and Deformity (New York: Routledge, 2006).
Turner, Wendy J., and Pearman, Tory Vandeventer (eds.), The Treatment of Disabled Persons in Medieval Europe: Examining Disability in the Historical, Legal, Literary, Medical, and Religious Discourses of the Middle Ages (Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2010).
Valente, Joseph, “Modernism and Cognitive Disability: A Genealogy,” in A Handbook of Modernism Studies, ed. by Rabaté, Jean-Michel (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), pp. 379–98.
Vidali, Amy, “Seeing What We Know: Disability and Theories of Metaphor,” Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, 4.1 (2010), 33–54.
Vrettos, Athena, Somatic Fictions: Imagining Illness in Victorian Culture (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995).
Wendell, Susan, The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability (New York: Routledge, 1996).
Wheatley, Edward, Stumbling Blocks before the Blind: Medieval Constructions of a Disability (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2010).
Wilson, Philip K., “Eighteenth-Century ‘Monsters’ and Nineteenth-Century ‘Freaks’: Reading the Maternally Marked Child,” Literature and Medicine, 21.3 (2002), 1–25.
Wood, Mary Elene, The Writing on the Wall: Women's Autobiography and the Asylum (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994).
Wu, Cynthia, Chang and Eng Reconnected: The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2012).
Yergeau, Melanie, and Duffy, John (eds.), “Disability and Rhetoric,” special issue of Disability Studies Quarterly, 31.3 (2011), n. pag., http://dsq-sds.org/issue/view/84.
Youngquist, Paul, Monstrosities: Bodies and British Romanticism (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2003).
Zola, Irving Kenneth, “‘Any Distinguishing Features?’ – The Portrayal of Disability in the Crime-Mystery Genre,” Policy Studies Journal, 15.3 (1987), 485–513.