Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home
The Cambridge History of Classical Literature
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 11
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Williams, Gareth 1993. On Ovid's Ibis: a poem in context. Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society, Vol. 38, Issue. , p. 171.

    Morgan, Llewelyn 2003. Child's Play: Ovid and his Critics. Journal of Roman Studies, Vol. 93, Issue. , p. 66.

    Sciarrino, Enrica 2004. Putting Cato the Censor'sOriginesin Its Place. Classical Antiquity, Vol. 23, Issue. 2, p. 323.

    Botha, Pieter J. J. 2009. The Greco-Roman Book: Contextualising Early Christian Documents. Acta Patristica et Byzantina, Vol. 20, Issue. 1, p. 2.

    2012. A Companion to Augustine. p. 517.

    Avlamis, Pavlos 2012. The Encyclopedia of Ancient History.

    Whitton, Christopher L. 2013. A Companion to the Neronian Age. p. 149.

    Danckaert, Lieven 2013. Magis Rythmus Quam Metron: The Structure of Seneca's Anapaests, and the Oral/Aural Nature of Latin Poetry. Symbolae Osloenses, Vol. 87, Issue. 1, p. 148.

    Power, Tristan 2014. Suetonius' Tacitus. Journal of Roman Studies, Vol. 104, Issue. , p. 205.

    Morgan, Llewelyn 2018. A Companion to Ancient Epigram. p. 127.

    Belk, John 2018. Horace’s Odes as the “Hidden Rhetoric” of the Principate, 27 BCE to 14 CE. Rhetoric Review, Vol. 37, Issue. 2, p. 155.

    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    The Cambridge History of Classical Literature
    • Online ISBN: 9781139054881
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521210430
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature provides a comprehensive, critical survey of the literature of Greece and Rome from Homer till the Fall of Rome. This is the only modern work of this scope; it embodies the very considerable advances made by recent classical scholarship, and reflects too the increasing sophistication and vigour of critical work on ancient literature. The literature is presented throughout in the context of the culture and the social and hisotircal processes of which it is an integral part. The overall aim is to offer an authoritative work of reference and appraisal for one of the world's greatest continuous literary traditions. The work is divided into two volumes, each with a similar and broadly chronological structure. Among the special features are important introductory chapters by the General Editors on 'Books and Readers', discussing the conditions under which literature was written and read in antiquity. There are also extensive Appendices or Authors and Works giving detailed factual information in a convenient form. Technical annotation is otherwise kept to a minimum, and all quotations in foreign languages are translated.

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents


Page 1 of 2


  • 1 - Books and readers in the Roman world
    pp 1-32
  • View abstract

    Summary

    For half a millennium the printed book has been the primary means of communicating ideas in the Western world. The history of Roman literature effectively begins with Ennius. Plautus in his comedies had reproduced his Greek models in metres in which the influence of native Latin verse is apparent. Roman educational institutions, predictably, follow Greek models. The casual and fluid nature of publication in the ancient world is described just as characteristic of what happened to books after publication. For educational and rhetorical purposes epitomes and abstracts were increasingly in vogue. Roman scholars took over the traditions of Alexandrian literary scholarship along with the rest of Hellenistic culture. From Virgil onwards Latin poetry was profoundly influenced by rhetoric, and a style of literary criticism that fails to take account of this fact will miss much that is essential to the poetry. Literary Latin was an artificial dialect, quite distinct from the spoken idiom.
  • 2 - Literary criticism
    pp 33-50
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Literary critics today fall into two broad categories. There are the academics, out to impress their colleagues and instruct their pupils. And there are, in the great tradition of Dryden, creative writers meditating on their craft. In Greece scholars seem to have been called kritikoi before they took over the term grammatikos. With Quintilian the authors come to a professional rhetor, well qualified, as well as inclined, to assess Cicero as well as praise him. Quintilian knew how literary criticism of oratory should be conducted. It is a mark of his sophistication that only recently has scholars approached Cicero in this wide and unprejudiced way. Cicero brought to the theory of oratory a width that it had never known before and was rarely to know again. He thinks often of an ideal orator, who shall have all the qualities of Cicero himself and more besides.
  • 3 - The genesis of poetry in Rome
    pp 51-59
  • View abstract

    Summary

    For centuries the Romans had achieved considerable political sophistication, and that involved public debates with carefully composed speeches. This chapter discusses the genesis of poetry in Rome. The word carmen was adopted by Augustan poets as the generic term for their own compositions. This meaning of poem and poetry was a specialization imposed on a word whose meaning was originally much wider. The most extensive surviving carmen is a prayer quoted by the elder Cato. Early in the nineteenth century, the great German historian Niebuhr, anxious to give a basis to his reconstruction of the early Roman tradition, revived the theory that legends such as that of Horatius or Verginia had been preserved by oral tradition in great families in the form of heroic lays. The ancient Roman custom was to set a man's titulus over his grave. L. Cornelius Scipio Barbatus's consul in 298 BC has epitaphs in Saturnian verse.
  • 4 - Ennius' Annales
    pp 60-76
  • View abstract

    Summary

    This chapter focuses on an important bearing on the shape and unity of Ennius' Annales as a whole. The cult of the Muses was introduced by M. Fulvius Nobilior, who built a Templum Herculis Afusarum to house statues of Hercules Musageta and the Nine Sisters taken with much other booty from what had once been Pyrrhus' palace in Ambracia. The title of Ennius' poem looks immediately to the priestly Annales, yearbooks, instituted by the Pythagorean king Numa Pompilius and kept by the pontifices. Ennius has achieved the rapidity of Homer by using a mixture of dactyls and spondees quite different from that in his tree-felling passage, and by keeping Homer's enjambments, essential to the impetus of a passage describing great and uncontrolled natural forces at large. He is essentially un-Homeric in calling the South Wind spiritus Austri imbricitor, that is Hellenistic baroque.
  • 5 - Drama
    pp 77-137
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The acting profession came to depend and to thrive on a circuit of musical and dramatic festivals among which Athens was only one of several centres. This chapter looks at the importance of the theatrical traditions of South Italy and Sicily. Andronicus is a major figure in the history of literature as the first to tackle the problems of literary translation. His approach was crucial for the subsequent development of Latin literature. All kinds of Roman drama were far more musical and operatic than Greek. Grammarians drew a distinction between tragoediae, modelled on Greek tragedy, and fabulae praetextae 'Hem-' or 'Robe-plays ', on Roman themes, ancient and modern. This is parallel to the distinction of comoediae and fabulae togatae. Accius, the polemical scholar, the Pergamene rhetorician, the authority on orthography, the head of the college of poets, the historian of the Greek and Roman theatre, and the Hellenistic tragedian evinces a new self-confidence and artistic awareness.
  • 6 - Prose literature
    pp 138-155
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Prose literature, as opposed to mere writing, may be said to have begun when men began to exploit the fact that their views on important matters could be disseminated by means of the liber or uolumen which could be multiplied. The intended readers of the kind of technical works reviewed in this chapter were influential Romans professionally interested in the subjects treated. The chapter discusses some kinds of writing which are best described as political manifestos or memoirs. In the Greek world it had long been the custom of authors to address poems, histories, and technical works to a patron or friend, so that the work might take on the appearance of a private letter of didactic character. By using Latin in his own pithy way, M. Porcius Cato the Elder was asserting the new importance of the language in international diplomacy, and implicitly rejecting the attitude and the Greek rhetoric of a T. Quinctius Flamininus.
  • 7 - The satires of Ennius and Lucilius
    pp 156-172
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Ennius was not only a major dramatist and the author of the most ambitious Roman epic. He also extended the range of Latin poetry in a series of compositions in the genus hundle, the low key, some based on Greek models, and others original. This chapter focuses on the nature and origin of Latin satire. Ennius' minor works as a whole remind one of many features of lowkey, unpretentious Alexandrian poetry and moralizing literature. A judicious modern account of fourth- and third-century Greek literature as it relates in style, intent, and variety to all of Ennius' minor works remains a desideratum. The language and form of those earliest works were those of drama, as was only natural, since Ennius had established the iambo-trochaic metres and diction of the form as the ordinary medium for any poetry of less than heroic pretensions; including in Lucilius' time even epitaphs.
  • 8 - Predecessors
    pp 173-177
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The short poems of Catullus, which he himself calls nugae 'trifles', confront the critic with a paradox: poetry of obviously major significance and power which belongs formally to a minor genre. Aulus Gellius and Cicero have preserved five short epigrams by a trio of accomplished amateurs, Valerius Aedituus, Porcius Licinus and Qyintus Lutatius Catulus. These are freely adapted from Hellenistic Greek originals, most of which can be identified in the Greek Anthology. Cicero is a more important figure in the history of Latin poetry than is commonly acknowledged. For one of the hallmarks of the new school of poets was their insistence on careful and exact craftsmanship. Cicero's hexameters, flat and lifeless as they read, are technically much more like those of Catullus than those of Ennius or even Lucretius. The precise part played by Cicero in the development of Latin poetry is bound to remain obscure, given the fragmentary nature of the evidence.
  • 9 - The new direction in poetry
    pp 178-206
  • View abstract

    Summary

    In 50 BC Cicero begins a letter to Atticus with a playful reference to a mannerism of the New Poets, the spondaic hexameter. The spondaic hexameter is as old as Homer, but in Homer infrequent and casual. In the Hellenistic poets, Aratus, Callimachus, Apollonius, Euphorion, and odiers, and in their Latin imitators it becomes frequent and designed. The New Poets were a group of young and impressionable poets in the generation after Cicero's who shared a literary attitude relating even to stylistic minutiae, of which Cicero chose to notice two. They wished to change Latin poetry, and to a considerable extent they succeeded in their purpose. The Marriage of Peleus and Thetis is Catullus' longest and most ambitious poem, undoubtedly his intended masterpiece. The subject of the poem, home-coming, is likely to occasion diffuse sentiment. Catullus' delight is exactly reflected in the wit and complicated play, the happiness, of his language.
  • 10 - Lucretius
    pp 207-229
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The De rerum natura of Lucretius represents one of the rarest of literary accomplishments, a successful didactic poem on a scientific subject. Epicureanism was the most conservative of the Hellenistic philosophies, but it was not immune to change and modification. While Lucretius was writing, Epicurean philosophers like Philodemus were busy developing the master's doctrine and attempting to answer the objections of their philosophical opponents. Lucretius was familiar with Philodemus or was in any way influenced by his work. More significant is the poet's relationship with contemporary Stoicism. If the central question in Lucretian criticism is the relationship between poetry and philosophy, then it is important to understand the extent to which Lucretius accurately reflects the spirit of Epicurus. The idea of introducing the old Homeric myth of Venus and Mars may in fact have come to Lucretius from Empedodes, who is said to have used it for the two great forces of love and strife which control the Empedoclean universe.
  • 11 - Cicero and the relationship of oratory to literature
    pp 230-267
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Marcus Tullius Cicero has been endlessly studied as a character and as a politician, and certainly these aspects of him are of absorbing interest; but his chief historical importance is as a man of letters. Hellenistic criticism recognized three styles, the grand, middle and plain. Not only higher education but literature in general at Rome was founded on oratory. Cicero in the Orator associated these with the three aims of oratory, to move, to please and to convince respectively. The grand style was forceful, weighty, spacious, emotional and ornate, carrying men away: it was what is understood by rhetorical. The ambition to be an orator probably came to the boy from the hill-town of Arpinum, south-east of Rome, through his being entrusted by his father to the care of Rome's leading orator, Lucius Crassus. The nature of Roman legal procedure promotes Cicero's oratorical development.
  • 12 - Sallust
    pp 268-280
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Sallust was the first recognized classic amongst Roman historians, avidly read, admired and abused, immensely influential on many diverse writers, and cited more often than any Latin prose author, Cicero alone excepted. Oratory at Rome reached its maturity a generation or more before history. That simple fact largely explains why Cicero's remarks about history are prejudiced and condescending. Sallust may more fairly be criticized, in his Catiline at least, for die disproportionate bulk of introductory matter in a comparatively short composition. Ancient critics recorded the most distinctive features of his style: archaism, brevity, abruptness, and novelty. The brevity which Sallust pursued and often attained made a great impression on Roman readers, to judge by the numerous references to it. Sallust's outspokenness and self-will commanded the attention of contemporaries and posterity. He puts over his personality, real or assumed, very forcefully: witness the violent opening words of the lugurtha.
  • 13 - Caesar
    pp 281-285
    • By R. M. Ogilvie, St Salvator's College, University of St Andrews
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Julius Caesar's surviving output comprises seven books on the Gallic Wars and three on the Civil Wars. This chapter presents the literary background to the Commentaries on the Gallic Wars and on the Civil Wars. The publication of the Commentaries was timed to assert his claim on the gratitude of his fellow-countrymen and to display his dignitas, the Roman quality of achievement which merits recognition by high office. The Gallic Wars was a statement of Caesar's achievements. Caesar's motive is principally simplicity, but the comparison with Livy shows that he is also influenced by concern for purity or propriety of diction. Language had always been a study of interest to him. The style and presentation follow the pattern of the Gallic Wars. The Bellum Hispaniense is one of the very few works written in a predominantly un-literary Latin, and is a very valuable source for the knowledge of the language.
  • 14 - Prose and mime
    pp 286-294
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The trivium and quadrivium of medieval education descend ultimately from Varro's Disciplinae, a work of his eighties. Indeed traces of Varronian systematization still lurk in modern university syllabuses. Characteristic methods, of research and of disposition, can be detected in widely scattered areas: they serve to reveal the Roman polymath at work and to explain how, in a full life, one man's output could be so colossal. Varro found in Menippus, a third-century Syrian freedman writing under Cynic influence, a model for profitable imitation and his 150 Menippeae, combining prose and verse, humour and moral improvement, dominated the literary output of his active public life. Nepos is an intellectual pygmy whom one finds associating uneasily with the literary giants of his generation. Cornelius Nepos and Varro diverge sharply from the narrow traditions of Roman and familial pride, which constitute the origins of Roman biography. Cicero acknowledges with embarrassment his pleasure in the mime's humour.
  • 15 - Uncertainties
    pp 295-300
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Cicero was murdered by the soldiers of Antony and Octavian in December of 43 BC. In the following year, according to the ancient tradition, Virgil began to write the Eclogues. In the work of Virgil and Horace it seems that the process of assimilation has achieved a happy equilibrium: the most characteristic monuments of Augustan poetry display a formally and aesthetically satisfying fusion of new and old, native and alien elements. For the first time since the classical age of Greece the competing claims of technique and inspiration were again harmonized. After the elimination of Octavian's last rival at Actium in 31 BC the Roman world entered on an unexampled period of peace and prosperity. Naturally the official author of these blessings expected his achievements to be reflected in contemporary literature. A tradition of court poetry going back through Theocritus and Callimachus to Pindar and beyond offered obvious models.
  • 16 - Theocritus and Virgil
    pp 301-319
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Theocritus of Syracuse, who invented the pastoral, was a Hellenistic poet, a contemporary of Callimachus and Apollonius. A proud claim, made with all the delicate force of which pastoral rhetoric is capable: the claim, that is, of being the first Latin poet to imitate Theocritean pastoral; and made at the beginning of an eclogue which owes little or nothing overtly to Theocritus. Virgil's imitation of Theocritus is restricted mainly, and not surprisingly, to the pastoral Idylls, with the notable exception of Idyll, Simaetha's incantation, a most unpastoral song which Virgil managed to translate into a pastoral setting. The publication of the Book of Eclogues is an epoch in Latin poetry. Virgil's Eclogue may be taken as a personal expression of a public attitude. Time is a relation of experience, and much had happened in the few urgent years during which Virgil was meditating his book.
  • 17 - The Georgics
    pp 320-332
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The misery of the years following Julius' murder are recalled in Virgil's next work, the Georgics, in the magnificent rhetoric of the finale of Book I, 466-514, which represents the chaos as continuing and the young Octavian as the only hope. Seneca said pertinently that Virgil was interested in what could be said most gracefully, not most truthfully, and wrote not to teach farmers but to delight readers. In Virgil the technically didactic matter is eclectic, yet it forms too large a part of the poem for it to be taken as purely symbolic. In the case of a poem whose excellence depends on a variety of features the best, perhaps the only, way of doing justice to it is by a running commentary, in terms of structure. To several sensitive critics the Georgics has suggested a musical composition, a symphony with four movements and various themes enunciated and then harmoniously interwoven.
  • 18 - The Aeneid
    pp 333-369
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Virgil's Aeneid was conceived and shaped as a national and patriotic epic for the Romans of his day. Certainly the Romans hailed it as such, and it rapidly became both a set text in education and the natural successor to the Annales of Ennius as the great poetic exposition of Roman ideals and achievements. One of the fountains of the Aeneid's inspiration was the national aspiration of Rome in Virgil's time; another, of equal if not greater importance, was the epic poetry of Homer. The Iliad and the Odyssey represented in the classical world the highest achievement of Greek poetry, and the admiration universally felt by the Romans for Homer was for the great national poet of the Greek world whose literature they revered. The Olympian deities enabled Virgil to enter in description the mythological world which delighted Ovid in his Metamorphoses.
  • 19 - Horace
    pp 370-404
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Horace is commonly thought of as a comfortable cheerful figure, well adjusted to society and loyally supporting the Augustan regime. The traditional stereotype is popular and superficial, the two divergent views are represented by several important works of scholarship. This chapter considers Horace's poetry that offers a number of contrasting features, such as public/private, urban/rural, Stoic/Epicurean, grand/plain. It focuses on a critique of the academic dichotomy. The chapter shows how small light poems can be structurally complex, and how within a given ode the style may shift from one level to another. It examines how parodies use solemnity for comic effect, how in a recusatio the grand style can be disavowed and employed at the same time, and how a contrast can be exploited by juxtaposition. Only a small proportion of Odes was written in praise of Augustus and those odes were notably restrained in comparison with the usual type of Hellenistic panegyric.
  • 20 - Love elegy
    pp 405-419
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The elegiac distich appears as a fully developed poetic form in Greece in the seventh century BC. This chapter concentrates on the famous Augustan love-poets. The love elegy or the book of love elegies may be considered as a creation of the Augustan age, though Catullus is sometimes included. His poem would seem to represent the prototype of the Augustan love elegy though love is only one theme among many; it is interwoven most skilfully with the themes of friendship, the loss of his brother, the Trojan War. The elegiac poets of the Augustan age, beginning with Cornelius Gallus, write whole books of elegies. Albius Tibullus' friendship with the great statesman M. Valerius Messalla Corvinus is one of the main themes of his poetry. The Corpus Tibullianum may be considered an anthology of poems written by members of that circle, probably published after Messalla's death.
  • 21 - Ovid
    pp 420-457
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The design and execution of the Amores can be properly understood only in relation to Ovid's predecessors. The chronology of Ovid's early poetry is perplexed and obscure, so that the composition of the Heroides cannot be exactly placed in a sequence with the two editions of the Amores and with the Ars amatoria. The material of the Heroides comes principally from Greek epic and tragedy. Ovid's language implies that the Metamorphoses will manage to be both Callimachean and un-Callimachean at once. Attempts have been made to detect a unity and hence a message in such aspects of the poem as its structure or its symbolism, even in its very diversity. In the technical sphere Ovid left a mark on the Latin poetic tradition that still endures: for the modern composer of elegiac couplets is normally expected to abide by the Ovidian rules.
  • 22 - Livy
    pp 458-466
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Internal evidence suggests that Livy began to write his History of Rome in or shortly before 29 BC by which time Octavian, the later Augustus, had restored peace and a measure of stability to the Roman world. Historical activity had flourished at Rome for 200 years before Livy and the project of writing the complete history of the state was not a new one. Livy was, indeed, acquainted with Augustus, who called him a Pompeian, which implied a conservative independence of outlook and he acted as literary adviser to the future emperor Claudius but it is impossible to trace political motives in his writing. In interpreting history in terms of individuals, Livy was following very much in the Hellenistic tradition. Livy's language has been much studied and the publication of a complete Concordance has opened new doors for the appreciation of his verbal sensitivity.
  • 23 - Minor figures
    pp 467-494
  • View abstract

    Summary

    This chapter discusses the literary form Appendix Vergiliana and other minor forms especially epigram and elegy. It also describes didactic, mythological epic and tragedy, other drama, and historical epic. Virgilian authorship is claimed by external sources for the whole Catalepton, a title used, incidentally, by Aratus for a collection of short poems. A group of poems directly addressed to three of Virgil's associates: Octavius Musa, a historian who was involved in the land disputes around Mantua, and Varius and Tucca, Virgil's later editors. Antiquity had no specialized scientific or technological idiom, and writers of textbooks and tracts were for the most part at the mercy of rhetoric. Vitruvius, the author of books on architecture, left style to the experts and schools. Celsus is more stylistically accomplished than Vitruvius but now of greater interest to historians of medicine than students of literature.
  • 24 - Challenge and response
    pp 495-502
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The first century of the Christian era has often been termed the' age of rhetoric'. Tacitus Dialogus is a valuable witness to the attitudes and aspirations of the first century. The arguments of Vipstanus Messalla have been cited to prove the corrupting effects of rhetorical education. For a professional poet in need of patronage the recitation must have been of some assistance. Statius, for instance, at one point refers to the fact that senators were in the habit of attending his readings and Juvenal, in sarcastic vein, confirms their success, though denying that they brought Statius any financial benefit. To see the literature of die first century in perspective, it seems best to bear in mind a number of disparate but possibly cumulative factors, educational, social, political and philosophical, all of which are, to a greater or lesser degree, relevant to die whole picture.

Page 1 of 2


Works Cited in the Text
Abel, K. (1967). Bauformen in Senecas Dialogen. Heidelberg.
Adams, J. N. (1973). ‘The vocabulary of the speeches in Tacitus' historical works’, B.I.C.S. 20: 124–44.
Ahl, F. M. (1976). Lucan, an introduction. New York.
Allen, W. (1972). ‘Ovid's cantare and Cicero's Cantores Euphorionis’, T.A.Ph.A. 103: 1–14.
Allen, W. S. (1973). Accent and rhythm: prosodic features of Latin and Greek. Cambridge.
Altevogt, H. (1952). Labor improbus. Münster, Westf.
Anderson, R. D., Parsons, P. J. and Nisbet, R. G. M. (1979). ‘Elegiacs by Gallus from Qaṣr Ibrîm’, J.R.S. 69: 125–55.
Anderson, W. S. (1964). Anger in Juvenal and Seneca. Berkeley.
Anderson, W. B. (1933). ‘Gallus and the Fourth Georgic’, C.Q. 27: 36–45, 73.
Anderson, W. S. (1961). ‘Venusina Lucerna. The Horatian model for Juvenal’, T.A.Ph.A. 92: 1–12.
André, J. (1949). Étude sur les termes de couleur dans la langue latine. Paris.
André, J.-M. (1967). Mécène. Essai de biographie spirituelle. Paris.
Anliker, K. (1960). Prologe und Akteinteilung in Senecas Tragödien. Bern & Stuttgart.
Arnheim, M. T. W. (1972). The senatorial aristocracy in the later Roman Empire. Oxford.
Arnott, W. G. (1970). ‘Phormio Parasitus’, G. & R. n.s. 17: 32–57.
Arnott, W. G. (1972). ‘Targets, techniques, and tradition in Plautus' Stichus’, B.I.C.S. 19: 54–79.
Arnott, W. G. (1975). Menander, Plautus, and Terence. Greece & Rome New Surveys in the Classics ix. Oxford.
Arns, E. (1953). La technique du livre d'après Saint Jérôme. Paris.
Astin, A. E. (1967). Scipio Aemilianus. Oxford.
Auerbach, E. (1953). Mimesis, tr. Trask, W. R.. Princeton.
Austin, R. G. (1961). ‘Virgil, Aeneid 2.567–88’, C.Q. n.s. 11: 185f.
Austin, R. G. (1964). (ed.). P. Vergili Maronis Aeneidos Liber secundus. Oxford.
Axelson, B. (1945). Unpoetische Wörter. Lund.
Axelson, B. (1958). ‘Der Mechanismus des ovidischen Pentameterschlusses: eine mikro-philologische Causerie’, in Herescu, (1958) 121–35.
Axelson, B. (1967). Korruptelenkull: Studien zur Textkritik der unechten Seneca- Tragödie Hercules Oetaeus. Lund.
Aymard, J. (1951). Quelques séries de comparaisons chez Lucain. Montpellier.
Badian, E. (1966). ‘The early historians’, in Dorey, T. A. (ed.), Latin historians 1–38. London.
Badian, E. (1970). Titus Quinctius Flamininus: Philhellenism and Realpolitik. Lectures in Memory of Louisa Taft Semple, Second Series. Cincinnati.
Badian, E. (1971).‘Ennius and his Friends’, in Ennius., Entretiens Hardt xvii 149–208. Geneva.
Bailey, C. (1935). Religion in Virgil. Oxford.
Barchiesi, M. (1962). Nevio epico. Turin.
Bardon, H. (1940). Les empereurs et les lettres latines d'Auguste à Hadrien. Paris.
Bardon, H. (1956). La littérature latine inconnue. ii. L'époque impériale. Paris.
Barlow, C. W. (1938). (ed.). Epistolae Senecae ad Paulum et Pauli ad Senecam quae vocantur. Papers and Monographs of the American Academy x. Rome.
Barnes, J. W. B. and Lloyd-Jones, H. (1963). ‘Un nuovo frammento papiraceo dell' elegia ellenistica’, S.I.F.C. 35: 205–27.
Bayet, J. (1930). ‘Les premières “Géorgiques” de Virgile’, R.Ph. 3me sér. 4: 128–50; 227–47.
Bayet, J. (1955). ‘Un procédé virgilien: la déscription synthétique dans les Géorgiques’, in Studi in onore di G. Funaioli 9–18. Rome.
Beare, W. (1964). The Roman stage. 3rd edn. London.
Beazley, J. D. (1951). The development of Attic black-figure. Berkeley.
Bentley, R. (1726). ‘De metris Terentianis schediasma’, in P. Terenti Afri Comoediae i–xix. Cambridge.
Besslich, S. (1973).‘Die “Hörner” des Buches. Zur Bedeutung von cornua im antiken Buchwesen’, Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 44–50.
Bickel, E. (1950). ‘De elegis in Maecenatem, monumentis biographicis et historicis’, Rh. Mus. 93: 97–133.
Bignone, E. (1942–50). Storia della letteratura latina. 3 vols. Florence.
Birt, T. (1882). Das antike Buchwesen in seinem Verhältniss zur Litteratur mit Beiträgen zur Textgeschichte des Theokrit, Catull, Properz und anderer Autoren. Berlin.
Birt, T. (1913). Kritik und Hermeneutik nebst Abriss des antiken Buchwesens. Munich.
Blakeney, E. H. (1933). Ausonius. The Mosella. London.
Bolgar, R. (1954). The Classical heritage and its beneficiaries. Cambridge.
Bonner, S. F. (1949). Roman declamation in the late Republic and early Empire. Liverpool.
Bonner, S. F. (1977). Education in ancient Rome from the elder Cato to the younger Pliny. London.
Bourgery, A. (1922). Sénèque prosateur. Paris.
Bowersock, G. W. (1971). ‘A date in the Eighth Eclogue’, H.S.C.Ph. 75: 73–80.
Bowra, C. M. (1929). ‘Some Ennian phrases in the Aeneid’, C.Q. 23: 65f.
Bowra, C. M. (1933–4). ‘Aeneas and the Stoic Ideal’, G. & R. 3: 8f.
Boyancé, P. (1955).‘M. Fulvius Nobilior et le dieu ineffable’, R.Ph. 29: 172–92.
Boyancé, P. (1970). Études sur l' humanisme cicéronien. Collection Latomus cxxi. Brussels.
Bramble, J. C. (1974). Persius and the programmatic satire: a study inform and imagery. Cambridge.
Brisset, J. (1964). Les idées politiques de Lucain. Paris.
Brooks, C. and Warren, R. P. (1960). Understanding poetry. 3rd edn. New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Toronto.
Brower, R. A. (1959). Alexander Pope: the poetry of allusion. Oxford.
Brunt, P. A. (1963). Review of Meyer, H. D., Die Aussenpolitik des Augustus und die Augusteische Dichtung (Cologne 1961). J.R.S. 53: 170–6.
Buchheit, V. (1962). Studien zum Corpus Priapeorum. Zetemata xxviii. Munich.
Büchner, K. (1936). Beobachtungen über Vers- und Gedankengang bei Lukrez. Hermes, Einzelschrift i. Berlin.
Büchner, K. (1955). ‘P. Vergilius Maro’, Real-Encyclopädie viiia. Sep. publ. 1956.
Büchner, K. (1961). ‘Überlieferungsgeschichte der lateinischen Literatur des Altertums’, in Geschichte der Textüberlieferung i. Zürich.
Büchner, K. (1964). Cicero: Bestand und Wandel seiner geistigen Welt. Heidelberg.
Bühler, W. (1960). Die Europa des Moschos. Wiesbaden.
Bulloch, A. W. (1973). ‘Tibullus and the Alexandrians’, P.C.Ph.S. n.s. 19: 85ff.
Burck, E. (1929). ‘Die Komposition von Vergils Georgica’, Hermes 64: 279–321.
Burr, V. (1959). ‘Editionstechnik’, Reallexicon für Antike und Christentum (Stuttgart, 1941–) iv 597–610.
Butler, H. E. (1909). Post-Augustan poetry from Seneca to Juvenal. Oxford.
Cairns, F. J. (1969). ‘Propertius 1.18 and Callimachus' Acontius and Cydippe’, C.R. n.s. 19: 131–4.
Cairns, F. J. (1972). Generic composition in Greek and Roman poetry. Edinburgh.
Callmer, C. (1944). ‘Antike Bibliotheken’, Acta Inst. Rom. regni Sueciae 10: 145–93.
Cameron, A. (1964). ‘Literary allusions in the Historia Augusta’, Hermes 92: 363–77.
Cameron, A. (1970). Claudian: poetry and propaganda at the court of Honorius. Oxford.
Cameron, A. (1976). Circus factions. Blues and Greens at Rome and Byzantium. Oxford.
Camps, W. A. (1954). ‘A note on the structure of the Aeneid’, C.Q. n.s. 4: 214f.
Camps, W. A. (1959). ‘A second note on the structure of the Aeneid’, C.Q. n.s. 9: 53f.
Cancik, H. (1969). ‘Zur Geschichte des Aedes (Herculis) Musarum auf dem Marsfeld’, M.D.A.I. (R.) 76: 323–8.
Cancik, H. (1970). ‘Die Statue des L. Accius im Tempel der Camenen’, in Albrecht, M. and Heck, E. (eds.), Silvae: Festschrift für E. Zinn zum 60. Geburtstag 7–17. Tübingen.
Canter, H. V. (1925). Rhetorical elements in the tragedies of Seneca. University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature x.i. Urbana.
Caplan, H. (1954). (ed.). Rhetorica ad Herennium. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass. (1970). On eloquence. Cornell.
Cavenaile, R. (1958). (ed.). Corpus papyrorum Latinorum. Wiesbaden.
Cèbe, J.-P. (1960). ‘Le niveau culturel du public plautinien’, R.E.L. 38: 101–6.
Cichorius, C. (1908). Studien zu Lucilius. Leipzig.
Cizek, E. (1972). L'époque de Néron et ses controverses idéologiques. Roma Aeterna iv. Leiden.
Clarke, M. L. (1953). Rhetoric at Rome: a historical survey. London.
Classen, C. J. (1968). ‘Poetry and rhetoric in Lucretius’, T.A.Ph.A. 99: 77–118.
Clausen, W. V. (1959). A. Persi Flacci et D. lunii Iuvenalis Saturae. Oxford.
Clausen, W. V. (1964). ‘Callimachus and Latin poetry’, G.R.B.S. 5: 181–96.
Clausen, W. V. (1972). ‘On the date of the First Eclogue’, H.S.C.Ph. 76: 201–5.
Clausen, W. V. (1976a). ‘Virgil and Parthenius’, H.S.C.Ph. 80: 179.
Clausen, W. V. (1976b). ‘Ariadne's leave-taking: Catullus 64.116–20’, Ill.Cl.S. 2: 219–23.
Clausen, W. V. (1976c). ‘Catulli Veronensis Liber’, C.Ph. 71: 37–43.
Clausen, W. V. (1976d). ‘Virgil and Juvenal’, H.S.C.Ph. 80: 181–6.
Clift, E. H. (1945). Latin pseudepigrapha. Baltimore.
Coffey, M. (1957). ‘Seneca tragedies, 1922–1955’, Lustrum 2: 113–86.
Coffey, M. (1976). Roman satire. London & New York.
Cole, A. T. (1972). ‘The Saturnian verse’, Y.Cl.S. 21: 3–73.
Coleman, R. G. G. (1962). ‘Gallus, the Bucolics, and the ending of the Fourth Georgic’, A.J.Ph. 83: 55–71.
Conington, J. (1881). P. Vergilii Maronis Opera 1. London.
Costa, C. D. N. (1973). (ed.). Horace. London.
Crowther, N. B. (1971). ‘Valerius Cato, Furius Bibaculus, and Ticidas’, C.Ph. 66: 108–9.
Crump, M. M. (1920). The growth of the Aeneid. Oxford.
Dahlmann, H. (1951). ‘Zur Überlieferung über die “altrömischen Tafellieder”’, A.A.M. 17: 1191ff.
D'Alton, J. F. (1931). Roman literary theory and criticism. London.
Day Lewis, C. (1966). The Eclogues, Georgics and Aeneid of Virgil. (Trans.) Oxford.
De Decker, J. (1913). Juvenalis declamans. Ghent.
De Lacy, P. (1948). ‘Lucretius and the history of Epicureanism’, T.A.Ph.A. 79: 12–23.
De Lacy, P. (1957). ‘Process and value: an Epicurean dilemma’, T.A.Ph.A. 88: 114–26.
Derow, P. S. (1973). ‘The Roman calendar, 190–168 B.C.’, Phoenix 27: 345–56.
Devoto, J. (1954). Tabulae Iguvinae. Rome.
Dickinson, R.J. (1973). ‘The Tristia: poetry in exile’, in Binns, J. W. (ed.), Ovid 154–90. London.
Dilke, O. A. W. (1960), (ed.). Lucan book VII. Revision of Postgate's edition (Cambridge 1913). Cambridge.
Doblhofer, E. (1966). Die Augustuspanegyrik des Horaz in formalhistorischer Sicht. Heidelberg.
Dorey, T. A. (1965). (ed.). Cicero. Studies in Latin literature and its influence. London.
Douglas, A. E. (1966). M. Tullii Ciceronis Brutus. Oxford.
Douglas, A. E. (1968). Cicero. Greece & Rome New Surveys in the Classics ii. Oxford.
Douglas, A. E. (1973). ‘The intellectual background of Cicero's Rhetorica: a study in method’ in Temporini, H., Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (Berlin, 1972–) 1.3 95–138. Berlin & New York.
Douglas, F. L. (1929). A study of the Moretum. New York.
Drabkin, I. E. (1930). The Copa. New York.
Drew, D. L. (1923). ‘The Copa’, C.Q. 17: 73–81.
Drew, D. L. (1925). ‘The Copa–ii’, C.Q. 19: 37–42.
Drexler, H. (1932/3). Plautinische Akzentstudien. 2 vols. Breslau.
Drexler, H. (1967). Einführung in die römische Metrik. Darmstadt.
Drexler, H. (1969). Die Iambenkürzung. Hildesheim.
Du Quesnay, I. M. Le M. (1976). ‘Vergil's Fourth Eclogue’, Papers of the Liverpool Latin Seminar 1976. ARCA 2. Liverpool.
Duckett, E. S. (1925). Catullus in English poetry. Smith College Class. Stud. vi. Northampton, Mass.
Duckworth, G. E. (1952). The nature of Roman comedy. Princeton.
Duckworth, G. E. (1954). ‘The architecture of the Aeneid’, A.J.Ph. 75: 1f.
Duckworth, G. E. (1957). ‘The Aeneid as a trilogy’, T.A.Ph.A. 88: 1f.
Duckworth, G. E. (1959). ‘Virgil's Georgics and the Laudes Galli’, A.J.Ph. 80: 225–37.
Duckworth, G. E. (1962). Structural patterns and proportions in Vergil's Aeneid. Michigan.
Duckworth, G. E. (1969). Vergil and classical hexameter poetry: a study in metrical variety. Ann Arbor.
Due, O. S. (1962). ‘An essay on Lucan’, Class, et Med. 22: 68–132.
Duff, J. D. (1928). (ed.). Lucan. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Dziatzko, K. (1899a). ‘Buch’, Pauly, A.Wissowa, G.Kroll, W., Real-Encyclopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft (Stuttgart, 1893–) iii 939–71.
Dziatzko, K. (1899b).‘Buchhandel’, Pauly, A.Wissowa, G.Kroll, W., Real-Encyclopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft (Stuttgart, 1893–) iii 973–85.
Eckhardt, L. (1936). Exkurse und Ekphraseis bei Lucan. Heidelberg.
Edwards, M. W. (1960). ‘The expression of Stoic ideas in the Aeneid’, Phoenix 14: 151f.
Eliot, T. S. (1927). Introduction to Seneca his tenne tragedies translated into English, edited by Newton, Thomas, anno 1581. London & New York.
Elliott, R. C. (1960). The power of satire, magic, ritual, art. Princeton.
Ellis, R. (1891). Noctes Manilianae. Oxford.
Enk, P. J. (1918). (ed.). Gratti Cynegeticon quae supersunt. 2 vols. Zutphen.
Enk, P. J. (1919). ‘De Lydia et Diris carminibus’, Mnemosyne n.s. 47: 382–409.
Enk, P. J. (1953).‘The Latin accent’, Mnemosyne 4.6: 93–109.
Enmann, H. (1884). Eine verlorene Geschichte der römischen Kaiser und das Buch De viris illustribus urbis Romae. Philologus Suppl. IV 337–501.
Ewbank, W. W. (1933). (ed.). The poems of Cicero. London.
Fairclough, H. R. (1934). (ed.). Virgil II: Aeneid VI–XII and the minor poems. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Fedeli, P. (1972). ‘Sulla prima bucolica di Virgilio’, G.I.F. 24: 273–300.
Ferguson, J. (1975). Utopias of the classical world. London.
Fiske, G. C. (1920). Lucilius and Horace. Madison.
Fraenkel, E. (1922). Plautinisches im Plautus. Berlin.
Fraenkel, E. (1927). ‘Zur Vorgeschichte des versus quadrants’, Hermes 62: 357–70.
Fraenkel, E. (1928). Iktus und Akzent im lateinischen Sprechvers. Berlin.
Fraenkel, E. (1937). Review of Pasquali (1936), in J.R.S. 27: 262ff.
Fraenkel, E. (1951a). ‘Additional notes on the prose of Ennius’, Eranos 49: 50ff.
Fraenkel, E. (1951b). ‘The pedigree of the Saturnian metre’, Eranos 49: 170f.
Fraenkel, E. (1956). ‘Catulls Trostgedicht für Calvus’, W.S. 69: 279–88.
Fraenkel, E. (1957). Horace. Oxford.
Fraenkel, E. (1960). Elementi plautini in Plauto, tr. Munari, F.. Florence. (Rev. version of Plautinisches im Plautus. Berlin 1922.)
Fraenkel, E. (1964). Kleine Beiträge zur klassischen Philologie. 2 vols. Rome.
Fraenkel, E. (1966). ‘The Dirae’, J.R.S. 56: 142–55.
Fraenkel, E. (1968). Leseproben aus Reden Ciceros und Catos. Sussidi eruditi xxii. Rome.
Frank, T. (1928). Catullus and Horace. Oxford.
Fraser, P. M. (1972). Ptolemaic Alexandria. 3 vols. Oxford.
Friedländer, L. (1886). (ed.). M. Valeri Martialis Epigrammaton Libri. 2 vols. Leipzig.
Friedländer, L. (1908–28). Roman life and manners under the early Empire, tr. Magnus, L. A., Freese, J. H., Gough, A. B.. 4 vols. London.
Friedländer, P. (1912). Johannes von Gaza und Paulus Silentiarius. Leipzig & Berlin.
Friedrich, W. H. (1933). Untersuchungen zu Senecas dramatischer Technik. Leipzig.
Friedrich, W. H. (1954). ‘Sprache und Stil des Hercules Oetaeus’, Hermes 82: 51–84. Repr. in Lefèvre (1972) 500–44.
Frost, R. (1946). The poems of Robert Frost. New York.
Furley, D. J. (1966). ‘Lucretius and the Stoics’, B.I.C.S. 13: 13–33.
Gabba, E. (1956). Appiano e la storia delle guerre civile. Florence.
Gaiser, K. (1970). ‘Die plautinischen Bacchides und Menanders Dis exapaton’, Philologus 114: 51–87.
Gaiser, K. (1972).‘Zur Eigenart der römischen Komödie: Plautus und Terenz gegenüber ihren griechischen Vorbildern’, Temporini, H., Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (Berlin, 1972–) 1.2 1027–1113.
Galinsky, G. K. (1975). Ovid's Metamorphoses: an introduction to the basic aspects. Berkeley & Los Angeles.
Galletier, E. (1920). Epigrammata et Priapea. Paris.
Garson, R. W. (1964). ‘Some critical observations on Valerius Flaccus' Argonautica, 1’, C.Q. n.s. 14: 267–79.
Geffcken, J. (1911). ‘Studien zur griechischen Satire’, Neue Jahrbücher für das klassiche Altertum 27: 393–411, 469–93.
Gelzer, M. (1968). Caesar, tr. Needham, P.. Cambridge, Mass.
Georgii, H. (1891). Die antike Äneiskritik. Stuttgart.
Getty, R. J. (1955). (ed.). M. Annaei Lucani De bello ciuili Liber I. Corr. repr. Cambridge.
Giancotti, F. (1959). Il preludio di Lucrezio. Messina, Florence.
Giardina, I. C. (1966). L. Annaei Senecae tragoediae. 2 vols. Bologna.
Gigon, O. (1938). ‘Bemerkungen zu Senecas Thyestes’, Philologus 93: 176–83.
Giussani, C. (1896). Studi lucreziani. Turin.
Gomme, A. W. (1937). ‘Menander’, in Essays in Greek history and literature 249–95. Oxford.
Goodyear, F. R. D. (1971). ‘The Dirae’, P.C.Ph.S. n.s. 17: 30–43.
Goold, G. P. (1970). ‘Servius and the Helen Episode’, H.S.C.Ph. 74: 101f.
Gossage, A. J. (1972). ‘Statius’, in Neronians and Flavians: Silver Latin 1. Greek and Latin Studies, ed. Dudley, D. R.. London.
Gow, A. S. F. (1950). (ed.). Theocritus. 2 vols. Cambridge.
Gow, A. S. F. (1952). (ed.). Theocritus. 2 vols. 2nd edn. Cambridge.
Gow, A. S. F. and Page, D. L. (1965). (eds.). Hellenistic epigrams. 2 vols. Cambridge.
Gow, A. S. F. (1968). (eds.). The Greek Anthology. The Garland of Philip. 2 vols. Cambridge.
Granrud, J. E. (1913). ‘Was Cicero successful in the art oratorical?’, C.J. 8: 234–43.
Grant, M. A. (1924). Ancient rhetorical theories of the laughable. Wisconsin Studies in Language and Literature xxi. Madison.
Green, P. (1967). Juvenal, the sixteen satires. (Trans.) Harmondsworth.
Grenade, P. (1950). ‘Le mythe de Pompée et les Pompéiens sous les Césars’, R.E.A. 52: 28–67.
Gresseth, G. K. (1957). ‘The quarrel between Lucan and Nero’, C.Ph. 52: 24–7.
Griffin, J. (1979). ‘The Fourth Georgic, Virgil and Rome’, G. & R. n.s. 26: 61–8.
Griffith, J. G. (1969). ‘Juvenal, Statius, and the Flavian establishment’, G. & R. n.s. 16: 134–50.
Grimal, P. (1949). ‘L'episode d'Antée dans la Pharsale’, Latomus 8: 55–61.
Grimal, P. (1960). ‘L'éloge de Néron au début de la Pharsale’, R.E.L. 38: 296–305.
Grisart, A. (1959). ‘La publication des “Métamorphoses”: une source du récit d'Ovide (Tristes 1, 7, 11–40)’, in Atti del convegno Internazionale ovidiano II 125–56. Rome.
Gronovius, J. F. (1661). (ed.). L. Annaei Senecae Tragoediae. Leiden.
Gronovius, J. F. (1682). (ed.). L. Annaei Senecae Tragoediae. 2nd edn. rev. Gronovius, J.. Amsterdam.
Grube, G. M. A. (1965). The Greek and Roman critics. London.
Guillemin, A.-M. (1937). Le public et la vie littéraire à Rome. Paris.
Guillemin, A.-M. (1951). ‘L'inspiration virgilienne dans la Pharsale’, R.E.L. 29: 214–27.
Gwynn, A. (1926). Roman education from Cicero to Quintilian. Oxford.
Haase, F. (1852). (ed.). L. Annaei Senecae Opera quae supersunt. 3 vols. Leipzig.
Haffter, H. (1934). Untersuchungen zur altlateinischen Dichtersprache. Berlin.
Haffter, H. (1935). Die altlateinische Dichtersprache. Problemata x. Leipzig.
Hafner, G. (1968). Das Bildnis von Q. Ennius. Baden-Baden.
Haines, C. R. (1919). (ed.). The correspondence of Marcus Cornelius Fronto. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Handley, E. W. (1968). Menander and Plautus. London.
Harder, R. (1929). ‘Über Cicero's “Somnium Scipionis”’, Königsb. Abh., Geistesw. Kl. Heft III, 115–l50 = Kleine Schriften, ed. Marg, W. (1960) 354–95. Munich.
Harding, D. P. (1962). The club of Hercules. Urbana.
Haupt, M. (1875). Opuscula i. Leipzig.
Haupt, M. (1876). Opuscula iii. Leipzig.
Haury, A. (1955). Ironie et humour chez Cicéron. Leiden.
Helm, R. (1934). ‘Die Praetexta Octavia’, Sitz.-Ber. Berlin 283–347.
Helm, R. (1954). ‘Praetexta’, Pauly, A.Wissowa, G.Kroll, W., Real-Encyclopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft (Stuttgart, 1893–) xliv 1569–75.
Henry, J. (1873–89). Aeneidea, or critical, exegetical, and aesthetical remarks on the Aeneis. 4 vols. London, Edinburgh & Dublin.
Herescu, N. I. (1958). (ed.). Ovidiana: recherches sur Ovide. Paris.
Herington, C. J. (1961). ‘Octavia praetexta: a survey’, C.Q. n.s. 11: 18–30. Repr. in Lefèvre (1972) 376–401.
Herington, C. J. (1966). ‘Senecan tragedy’, Arion 5: 422–71.
Herrmann, L. (1924). Le théâtre de Sénèque. Paris.
Heseltine, M. (1913). (ed.). Petronius. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Highet, G. (1954). Juvenal the satirist. Oxford.
Highet, G. (1972). The speeches in Vergil's Aeneid. Princeton.
Holleman, A. W. J. (1971). ‘Ovid and politics’, Historia 20: 458–66.
Hollis, A. S. (1970). (ed.). Ovid, Metamorphoses Book VIII. Oxford.
Hollis, A. S. (1973). ‘Aemilius Macer, Alexipharmaca?’, C.R. n.s. 23: 11.
Hollis, A. S. (1977). ‘L. Varius Rufus, De Morte (Frs. 1–4 Morel)’, C.Q. n.s. 27: 187–96.
Hornsby, R. A. (1970). Patterns of action in the Aeneid. Iowa.
Horsfall, N. M. (1969). ‘Aclys and Cateia’, Class. et. Med. 30: 297–9.
Horsfall, N. M. (1976). ‘The Collegium Poetarum’, B.I.C.S. 23: 79–95.
Hosius, C. (1893). ‘Lucan und seine Quellen’, Rh. Mus. 48: 380–97.
Hosius, C. (1922). (ed.). Octavia Praetexta cum elementis commentarii. Bonn.
Housman, A. E. (1903–30). M. Manilii Astronomicon Libri. 5 vols. Cambridge. (Repr. in 2 vols. Olms 1972.)
Housman, A. E. (1972). Diggle, J. and Goodyear, F. R. D., (eds.). The classical papers of A. E. Housman. 3 vols. Cambridge.
Hubaux, J. (1930). ‘Une Epode d'Ovide’, Serta Leodiensia 187–245. Liège.
Hughes, T. (1969). ‘The Oedipus of Seneca’ (poetic translation), Arion 7: 324–71.
Humbert, J. (1925). Les plaidoyers écrits et les plaidoiries réelles de Cicéron. Paris.
Hunt, H. A. K. (1954). The humanism of Cicero. Melbourne.
Ihm, M. (1893). ‘Die Bibliotheken im alten Rom’, Centralbl.für Bibliothekswesen 10: 513–32.
Immisch, O. (1923). ‘Zur Frage der plautinischen Cantica’, Sitzungsberichte der Heidelberger Akademie (Phil.-Hist. Kl.) 14: 7. Abhandlung 41.
Jahn, O. (1851a). (ed.). Junii Juvenalis Saturarum libri V. Berlin.
Jahn, O. (1851b). ‘Über die Subscriptionen in den Handschriften römischer Classiker’, Ber. d. sächs. Ges. d. Wiss. zu Leipzig (Phil. -Hist. Kl.) 3: 327–72.
Jahn, P. (1908). ‘Vergil und die Ciris’, Rh. Mus. 63: 79–106.
Jal, P. (1963). La guerre civile à Rome. Paris.
Jellicoe, S. (1968). The Septuagint and modern study. Oxford.
Jocelyn, H. D. (1964). ‘Ancient scholarship and Virgil's use of republican Latin poetry. I’, C.Q. n.s. 14: 280–95.
Jocelyn, H. D. (1969). ‘The poet Cn. Naevius, P. Cornelius Scipio, and Q. Caecilius Metellus’, Antichthon 3: 32–47.
Jocelyn, H. D. (1972). ‘The poems of Quintus Ennius’, Temporini, H., Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (Berlin, 1972–) 1.2 987–1026.
Jocelyn, H. D. (1973). ‘Greek poetry in Cicero's prose writings’, Y.Cl.S. 23: 61–111.
Johnson, W. R. (1973). ‘The emotions of patriotism: Propertius 4.6’, California Studies in Classical Antiquity 6: 151–80.
Jordan, H. (1860). M. Catonis praeter librum de re rustica quae extant. Leipzig.
Juhnke, H. (1972). Homerisches in römischer Epik flavischer Zeit: Untersuchungen zu Szenennachbildungen und Strukturentsprechungen in Statius' Thebais und Achilleis und in Silius' Punica. Zetemata liii. Munich.
Kennedy, G. (1972). The art of rhetoric in the Roman world, 300 B.C. to A.D. 300. Princeton.
Kenney, E. J. (1963). Review of Buchheit (1962), in C.R. n.s. 13: 72–4.
Kenney, E. J. (1965). ‘The poetry of Ovid's exile’, P.C.Ph.S. n.s. 11: 37–49.
Kenney, E. J. (1970a). ‘Doctus Lucretius’, Mnemosyne 4.23: 366–92.
Kenney, E. J. (1970b). ‘Love and legalism: Ovid, Heroides 20 and 21’, Arion 9: 388–414.
Kenney, E. J. (1973). ‘The style of the Metamorphoses’, in Binns, J. W. (ed.), Ovid 116–53. London.
Kenney, E. J. (1976). ‘Ovidius prooemians’, P.C.Ph.S. n.s. 22: 46–53.
Kenyon, F. G. (1951). Books and readers in ancient Greece and Rome. 2nd edn. Oxford.
Keseling, P. (1941). ‘Horaz in den Tragödien des Seneca’, Philologische Wochenschrift 61: 190–2.
Kidd, D. A. (1977). ‘Virgil's voyage’, Prudentia 9: 97–103.
Kienast, D. (1954). Cato der Zensor. Heidelberg.
Kirkwood, G. M. (1961). ‘The authorship of the Strasbourg Epodes’, T.A.Ph.A. 92: 267–82.
Kleberg, T. (1967). Buchhandel und Verlagswesen in der Antike. Darmstadt.
Kleve, K. (1969). ‘Lucrèce, l'épicurisme et l'amour’, Actes du viii Congrè G. Budé 376–83.
Klingner, F. (1963). Virgils Georgica. Zurich & Stuttgart.
Klotz, A. (1947). ‘Zur Verskunst des römischen Dramas’, Würzburger Jahrbücher für die Altertumswissenschaft 2: 301–57.
Knauer, G. N. (1964). Die Aeneis und Homer. Göttingen.
Knight, W. F. Jackson (1939). Accentual symmetry in Vergil. Oxford.
Knight, W. F. (1966). Roman Vergil. 2nd edn. London.
Knoche, U. (1975). Roman satire, tr. Ramage, E. S.. Bloomington.
Knowles, M. D. (1958). ‘The preservation of the classics’, in The English library before 1700. London.
Knox, B. M. W. (1968). ‘Silent reading in antiquity’, G.R.B.S. 9: 421–35.
Koep, L. (1954). ‘Buch 1 (technisch)’, Reallexicon für Antike und Christentum (Stuttgart, 1941–) II 664–88.
Kost, K. (1971). Musaios, Hero und Leander. Bonn.
Krenkel, W. (1970). Lucilius, Satiren. Leiden.
Kroll, W. (1926). (ed.). Historia Alexandri Magni (Pseudo-Callisthenes) I: Recensio vetusta. Berlin.
Kroll, W. (1929). C. Valerius Catullus. Stuttgart.
Kruuse, J. (1941). ‘L'originalité artistique de Martial’, Class, et Med. 4: 248–300.
La Cerda, I. L. (1608). P. Vergilii Maronis Bucolica et Georgica. Frankfurt am Main.
Latte, K. (1960). Römische Religionsgeschichte. Munich.
Laughton, E. (1951). ‘The prose of Ennius’, Eranos 2: 35ff.
Laughton, E. (1960). ‘Observations on the style of Varro’, C.Q. n.s. 10: 1–28.
Laurand, L. (1907; 4th edn. 1936–8). Études sur le style des discours de Cicéron. 3 vols. Paris.
Lawall, G. (1966). ‘Apollonius' Argonautica: Jason as anti-hero’, Y.Cl.S. 19: 116–69.
Leeman, A. D. (1963). Orationis ratio. Amsterdam.
Lefèvre, E. (1972). (ed.). Senecas Tragödien. Darmstadt.
Lejay, P. (1925). Plaute. Paris.
Lelièvre, F. J. (1958). ‘Parody in Juvenal and T. S. Eliot’, C.Ph. 53: 22–5.
Leo, F. (1878). (ed.). L. Annaei Senecae Tragoediae, i (Observationes criticae), ii (critical text). Berlin.
Leo, F. (1897a). Die plautinischen Cantica und die hellenistische Lyrik. Berlin.
Leo, F. (1897b). ‘Die Composition der Chorlieder Senecas’, Rh. Mus. 52: 509–18.
Leo, F. (1906). ‘Diogenes bei Plautus’, Hermes 41: 441–6 (= Ausgewählte Kleine Schriften 1, Rome 1960, 185–90).
Leo, F. (1912). Plautinische Forschungen. 2nd edn. Berlin.
Leo, F. (1913). Geschichte der römischen Literatur i: Die archaische Literatur. Berlin.
Levin, H. (1952). Christopher Marlowe: the Overreacher. Cambridge, Mass.
Lewis, C. S. (1936). The allegory of love: a study in medieval tradition. Oxford.
Lewis, C. S. (1942). A preface to Paradise Lost. London, New York & Toronto.
Lewis, N. (1974). Papyrus in classical antiquity. Oxford.
Lindsay, W. M. (1904). Ancient editions of Plautus. Oxford & St Andrews.
Lindsay, W. M. (1907). Syntax of Plautus. Oxford.
Lindsay, W. M. (1922). Early Latin verse. Oxford.
Lişcu, M. O. (1937). L'expression des idées philosophiques chez Cicéron. Paris.
Longi, E. (1955). ‘Tre episodi del poema di Lucano’, in Studi in onore di G. Funaioli 181–8. Rome.
Lovejoy, A. O. and Boas, G. (1935). Primitivism and related ideas in antiquity. Baltimore.
Luck, G. (1959). Die römische Liebeselegie. Heidelberg.
Luck, G. (1968). (ed.). P. Ovidius Naso. Tristia. ii. Kommentar. Heidelberg.
Luck, G. (1974). ‘The woman's role in Latin elegiac poetry’, in Galinsky, G. K. (ed.), Perspectives of Roman poetry 23ff. University of Texas.
Ludwig, W. (1961). ‘Die Anordnung des vierten Horazischen Odenbuches’, Mus. Helv. 18: 1–10.
Ludwig, W. (1968). ‘The originality of Terence and his Greek models’, G.R.B.S. 9: 169–82.
Lyne, R. O. A. M. (1971). ‘The dating of the Ciris’, C.Q. n.s. 21: 233–53.
Maas, P. and Lloyd-Jones, H. (tr.) (1962). Greek metre. Oxford.
MacCary, W. T. and Willcock, M. M. (1976). (eds.). Plautus, Casina. Cambridge.
Mackail, J. W. (1930). The Aeneid of Virgil. Oxford.
MacKay, L. A. (1961). ‘The vocabulary of fear in Latin epic poetry’, T.A.Ph.A. 92: 308–16.
Magie, D. (1921–32). (ed.). The Historiae Augustae. 3 vols. London & Cambridge, Mass.
Malcovati, H. (1943). Cicerone e la poesia. Padua.
Malcovati, H. (1955). Oratorum Romanorum fragmenta liberae rei publicae. 2nd edn. (1st edn. 1930). 3 vols. Turin.
Mariotti, S. (1952). Livio Andronico e la traduzione artistica. Milan.
Mariotti, S. (1955). Il ‘Bellum Poenicum’ el'arte di Nevio. Rome.
Marouzeau, J. (1949). Quelques aspects de la formation du Latin littéraire. Paris.
Marrou, H. I. (1956). A history of education in antiquity, tr. Lamb, G.. London.
Marrou, H. I. (1958). Saint Augustin et la fin de la culture antique. 4th edn. Paris.
Marti, B. (1945). ‘The meaning of the Pharsalia’, A.J.Ph. 66: 352–576.
Marti, B. (1968). ‘La structure de la Pharsale’, in Lucain, Entretiens Hardt xv 1–50. Geneva.
Martin, R. H. (1976). (ed.). Terence, Adelphoe. Cambridge.
Martini, E. (1933). Einleitung zu Ovid. Prague.
Marx, F. (1904). C. Lucilii carminum reliquiae. 2 vols. Leipzig.
Mason, H. A. (1959). Humanism and poetry in the early Tudor period. London.
Mason, H. A. (1963). ‘Is Juvenal a classic?’, in Sullivan (1963) 93–167.
Matthews, J. (1975). Western aristocracies and Imperial court. Oxford.
Maurois, A. (1957). Les trois Dumas. Paris.
Meillet, A. (1928: 4th edn. 1948). Esquisse d'une histoire de la langue latine. Paris.
Mendell, C. W. (1967). Latin poetry: the age of rhetoric and satire. Hamden.
Mette, H.-J. (1964). ‘Die römische Tragödie’, Lustrum 9: 5–212.
Meuli, K. (1955). ‘Altrömische Maskenbrauch’, Mus.Helv. 12: 206–35.
Meyer, W. (1886). ‘Ueber die Beobachtung des Wortaccentes in der altlateinischen Poesie’, Abhandlungen der bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (Phil. -Hist. Kl.) 17: 3–120.
Michels, A. K. (1967). The calendar of the Roman Republic. Princeton.
Miniconi, P. J. (1951). Étude des thèmes guerriers de la poèsie greco-romaine. Publ. Fac. Lettr. Algér. 11 sér. 19. Paris.
Miniconi, P. J. (1962). ‘La joie dans l'Éneide’, Latomus 21: 503–11.
Mohrmann, C. (1961). Études sur le latin des Chrétiens. ii: Latin chrétien et médiéval. Rome.
Momigliano, A. (1941). Review of Farrington, B., Science and politics in the ancient world, in J.R.S. 31: 149–57.
Momigliano, A. (1957). ‘Perizonius, Niebuhr and the character of early Roman tradition’, J.R.S. 47: 104–14.
Momigliano, A. (1962). (ed.). The conflict between Paganism and Christianity in the fourth century. Oxford.
Momigliano, A. (1969). ‘Il trapasso fra storiografia antica e storiografia medievale’, Rivista storica italiana 81: 286–303.
Momigliano, A. (1975). Alien wisdom: the limits of Hellenization. Cambridge.
Morford, M. P. O. (1967). The poet Lucan. Oxford.
Motto, A. L. (1970). Seneca sourcebook: guide to the thought of Lucius Annaeus Seneca. Amsterdam.
Motto, A. L. (1973). Seneca. New York.
Mountford, J. F. and Schultz, J. T. (1930). Index rerum et nominum in scholiis Servii et Aelii Donati tractatorum. Ithaca, New York.
Müller, G. (1953). ‘Senecas Oedipus als Drama’, Hermes 81: 447–64. (Repr. in Lefevre (1972) 376–401.)
Müller, R. (1969). ‘Lukrez v iioiff und die Stellung der epikureischen Philosophic zum Staat und zu den Gesetzen’, in Jurewicz, O. and Kuch, H. (eds.), Die Krise der griechischen Polis. Berlin.
Münscher, K. (1922). Senecas Werke: Untersuchungen zur Abfassungszeit und Echtheit. Philologus Suppl.-Band xvi, Heft 1.
Mynors, R. A. B. (1958). (ed.). C. Valerii Catulli carmina. Oxford.
Nachmanson, E. (1941). Der griechische Buchtitel. Einige Beobachtungen. Gothenburg.
Nash, E. (1961–2). A pictorial dictionary of ancient Rome. London.
Nettleship, H. (1890). ‘Literary criticism in Latin antiquity’, Journal of Philology 18: 225–70.
Neumeister, C. (1964). Grundsätze der forensischen Rhetorik. Munich.
Newman, J. K. (1967). Augustus and the New Poetry. Collection Latomus lxxxviii. Brussels.
Nisbet, R. G. M. (1963). ‘Persius’, in Sullivan, (1963) 39–71.
Nisbet, R. G. M. and Hubbard, M. (1970). A commentary on Horace: Odes Book I. Oxford.
Norden, E. (1898; repr. Stuttgart 1973). Die antike Kunstprosa. 2 vols. Leipzig.
Norden, E. (1913). Agnostos Theos. Berlin.
Norden, E. (1915). Ennius und Vergilius. Kriegsbilder aus Roms grosser Zeit. Leipzig & Berlin.
Norden, E. (1916). (ed.). P. Vergilius Maro Aeneis Buch VI. Berlin.
Norden, E. (1926). (ed.). P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneis Buch VI. 3rd edn. Leipzig & Berlin.
Norden, E. (1939). Aus altrömischen Priesterbüchem. Lund.
Nougaret, L. (1943). ‘La métrique de Plaute et de Térence’, Mémorial des études latines … offert.… à J. Marouzeau 123–48. Paris.
Nougaret, L. (1948). Traité de métrique latine classique. Paris.
Ogilvie, R. M. (1965). A commentary on Livy Books 1–5. Oxford.
Ollfors, A. (1967). Studien zum Aufbau des Hexameters Lucans. Gothenburg.
Opelt, I. (1957).‘Die Seeschlacht vor Massilia bei Lucan’, Hermes 85: 435–45.
Opelt, I. (1969). ‘Zu Senecas Phoenissen’, in Lefevre, (1972) 272–85.
Otis, B. (1959). ‘Three problems of Aeneid 6’, T.A.Ph.A. 90: 165f.
Otis, B. (1963). Virgil: a study in civilized poetry. Oxford.
Otis, B. (1966). Ovid as an epic poet. Cambridge.
Packard, D. W. (1968). A concordance to Livy. 4 vols. Cambridge, Mass.
Page, D. L. (1940). (ed.). Select papyri iii. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Page, D. L. (1950). (ed.). Select papyri iii. Literary papyri: poetry. Revised repr. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Page, D. L. (1972). ‘Early Hellenistic elegy’, P.C.Ph.S. n.s. 18: 63–4.
Parsons, P. (1971). ‘A Greek Satyricon?’, B.I.C.S. 18: 53–68.
Pasquali, G. (1936). Preistoria della poesia romana. Florence.
Patin, H. J. G. (1883). Études sur la poèsie latine. 3rd edn. Paris.
Patzer, H. (1955).‘Zum Sprachstil des neoterischen Hexameters’, Mus. Helv. 12: 77–95.
Pearce, T. E. V. (1966). ‘The enclosing word-order in the Latin hexameter’, C.Q. n.s. 16: 140–71, 298–320.
Pearce, T. E. V. (1968). ‘A pattern of word-order in Latin poetry’, C.Q. n.s. 18: 334–54.
Pecchiura, P. (1965). La figura di Catone Uticense nella letteratura latina. Turin.
Peiper, R. and Richter, G. (1902). (eds.). L. Annaei Senecae Tragoediae. Leipzig.
Perry, B. E. (1965). Babrius and Phaedrus. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Peter, H. (1901). Der Brief in der römischen Literatur. Leipzig.
Peter, H. (1914). Historicorum Romanorum fragmenta. 2nd edn. Leipzig.
Peterson, W. (1891). (ed.). M. Fabi Quintiliani Institutions oratoriae Liber decimus. Oxford.
Petersson, T. (1920). Cicero: a biography. Berkeley.
Pfeiffer, R. (1968). History of classical scholarship from the beginnings to the end of the Hellenistic age. Oxford.
Phillips, O. C. (1968). ‘Lucan's Grove’, C.Ph. 62: 296–300.
Philp, R. H. (1968). ‘The manuscript tradition of Seneca's tragedies’, C.Q. n.s. 18: 150–79.
Pichon, R. (1906). Les derniers écrivains profanes. Paris.
Pichon, R. (1912). Les sources de Lucain. Paris.
Pierleoni, G. (1906). ‘Fu poeta Grattius?’, Rivista di Filologia e di Istruzone Classica 34: 580–97.
Pighi, G. B. (1963). ‘Seneca metrico’, Rivista di Filologia e di Istruzione Classica 91: 170–81.
Platnauer, M. (1922). (ed.). Ctaudian. 2 vols. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Platnauer, M. (1951). Latin elegiac verse. A study of the metrical usages of Tibullus, Propertius & Ovid. Cambridge.
Poncelet, R. (1957). Cicéron traducteur de Platon. Paris.
Portalupi, F. (1955). Bruto e i neo-atticisti. Turin.
Posch, S. (1969). Beobachtungen zur Theokritnachwirkung bei Vergil. Comm. Aenipont. xix. Innsbruck.
Pöschl, V. (1950). Die Dichtkunst Virgils: Bild und Symbol in der Aeneis. Innsbruck; tr. Seligson, G., Michigan 1962.
Poultney, J. W. (1959). The Bronze Tables of lguvium. A.P.A. Monograph xviii.
Pound, E. (1918). In The little review, ed. Anderson, M.. Chicago.
Préchac, M. (1934). ‘La date de la naissance de Sénèque’, R.E.L. 11: 360–75.
Putnam, M. C. J. (1960). ‘Catullus 66. 75–88’, C.Ph. 55: 223–8.
Putnam, M. C. J. (1965). The poetry of the Aeneid. Harvard.
Questa, C. (1967). Introduzione alla metrica di Plauto. Rome.
Questa, C. (1970). ‘Alcune strutture sceniche di Plauto e Menandro’, in Ménandre, Entretiens Hardt xvi 181–228. Geneva.
Qyinn, K. (1963). Latin explorations. London.
Qyinn, K. (1965).‘The Fourth Book of the Aeneid: a critical description’, G. & R. n.s. 12: 16f.
Radford, R. S. (1928). ‘Ovid's Carmina furtiva’, Phil. Quart. 7: 45–59.
Radford, R. S. (1930). ‘The Culex and Ovid’, Philologus. 86: 18–66.
Rambaud, M. (1953). Cicéron et l'histoire romaine. Paris.
Raven, D. S. (1965). Latin metre. London.
Rawson, E. (1973). ‘The interpretation of Cicero's “De Legibus’”, Temporini, H., Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (Berlin, 1972–) 1.4, 334–56. Berlin & New York.
Regenbogen, O. (1927/8). ‘Schmerz und Tod in den Tragödien Senecas’, Vorträge der Bibliothek Warburg vii 167–218. (Repr. as monograph with same title, Darmstadt 1963).
Regenbogen, O. (1932). Lukrez, seine Gestalt in seinem Gedicht. Neue Wege zur Antike ii.i Leipzig & Berlin. (Repr. (1961) in Kleine Schriften. Munich.)
Reitzenstein, R. (1912). ‘Zur Sprache der lateinischen Erotik’, S.H.A.W. 12: 9–36.
Rennie, W. (1921). ‘Satira tota nostra est’, C.R. 35: 21.
Reynolds, L. D. (1965). The medieval tradition of Seneca's letters. Oxford.
Reynolds, L. D. and Wilson, N. G. (1974). Scribes and scholars. A guide to the transmission of Greek and Latin literature. 2nd edn. Oxford.
Rhys Roberts, W. (1901). (ed.). Dionysius of Halicarnassus: the three Literary Letters. Cambridge.
Ribbeck, O. (1865). Der echte und der unechte Juvenal. Berlin.
Ribbeck, O. (1866). Prolegomena critica ad P. Vergili Maronis opera maiora. Leipzig.
Richter, W. (1957). (ed.). Vergil, Georgica (edn. with commentary).
Ricks, C. (1968). (ed.). A. E. Housman. New Jersey.
Rieth, C. (1964). Die Kunst Menanders in den Adelphen des Terenz. Hildesheim.
Rieu, E. V. (1950). Homer, the Iliad. (Trans.) Harmondsworth.
Rist, J. M. (1969). Stoic philosophy. Cambridge.
Roberts, C. H. (1954). ‘The Codex’, P.B.A. 40: 169–204.
Roberts, C. H. (1956). Greek literary hands 350 B.C.–A.D. 400. Corr. repr. Oxford.
Robinson, R. P. (1923). ‘Valerius Cato’, T.A.Ph.A. 54: 98–116.
Rohde, E. (1914). Der griechische Roman. 2nd edn. Leipzig.
Rose, H. J. (1934). A handbook of Greek literature. London.
Rose, K. F. C. (1971). The date and author of the Satyricon. Leiden.
Ross, D. O. jr. (1969a). Style and tradition in Catullus. Cambridge, Mass.
Ross, D. O. jr. (1969b). ‘Nine epigrams from Pompeii (Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (Berlin, 1863–) 4.4966–73)’, Y.Cl.S. 21: 127–42.
Ross, D. O. jr. (1975a). Backgrounds to Augustan poetry; Gallus, elegy and Rome. Cambridge.
Ross, D. O. jr. (1975b). ‘The Culex and Moretum as post-Augustan literary parodies’, H.S.C.Ph. 79: 235ff.
Rowell, H. T. (1947).‘The original form of Naevius' Bellum Poenicum’, A. J.Ph. 68: 35ff.
Rudd, N. (1960a). ‘Horace on the origins of Satire’, Phoenix 14: 36–44.
Rudd, N. (1960b). ‘Patterns in Horatian lyric’, A.J.Ph. 81: 373–92.
Rudd, N. (1976). Lines of enquiry: studies in Latin poetry. Cambridge.
Russell, D. A. (1964). ‘Longinus’ on the sublime. Oxford.
Rutz, W. (1965). ‘Lucan 1943–1963’, Lustrum 9: 243–340.
Sabine, G. H. and Smith, H. B. (1929). Cicero on the Commonwealth. Columbus, Ohio.
Saint-Denis, E. (1956). Virgile, Géorgiques (Collection des Universités de France, publiée sous le patronage de l'Association Guillaume Budé (Paris)). Paris.
Sanford, E. M. (1931).‘Lucan and his Roman critics’, C.Ph. 26: 233–57.
Sassoon, S. (1945). Siegfried's journey 1916–1920. London.
Scazzoso, P. (1956). ‘Reflessi misterici nelle Georgiche’, Paideia 11: 5–28.
Schanz, M. and Hosius, C. (1927). Geschichte der römischen Literatur i: Die römische Literatur in der Zeit der Republik. 4th edn. Munich.
Schmid, W. (1944). Review of Mewaldt, J., Der Kampf des Dichters Lukrez gegen die Religion, Gnomon 20: 97–100.
Schöpsdau, K. (1974). ‘Motive der Liebesdichtung in Vergils Dritter Ekloge’, Hermes 102: 268ff.
Schubart, W. (1921). Das Buch bei den Griechen und Römern. 2nd edn. Berlin & Leipzig.
Schulze, K. P. (1898). ‘Ovid Trist. iv.10.43f.’, Rh. Mus. 53: 541–5.
Schutter, K. H. E. (1952). Quibus annis comoediae Plautinae primum actae sint quaeritur. Groningen.
Scivoletto, N. (1966). ‘Quando nacque Seneca?’, G.I.F. 19: 21–31.
Scott, I. G. (1927). The grand style in the satires of Juvenal. Northampton, Mass.
Scriverius, P. (1621). (ed.). L. Annaeus Seneca Tragicus. 2 vols. Leiden.
Segal, C. (1966). ‘Orpheus and the Fourth Georgic’, A.J.Ph. 87: 307–25.
Seitz, K. (1965). ‘Der pathetische Erzählstil Lucans’, Hermes 93: 204ff.
Sellar, W. V. (1889). The Roman poets of the Republic. 3rd edn. Oxford.
Shackleton Bailey, D. R. (1965–70). (ed.). Cicero's Letters to Atticus. 7 vols. Cambridge.
Sherk, R. K. (1969). Roman documents from the Greek East: Senatus consulta and Epistulae to the age of Augustus. Baltimore.
Sherwin-White, A. N. (1966). The Letters of Pliny: a historical and social commentary. Oxford.
Shipp, G. P. (1953). ‘Greek in Plautus’, W.S. 66: 105–12.
Shipp, G. P. (1955). ‘Plautine terms for Greek and Roman things’, Glotta 34: 139–52.
Sifakis, G. M. (1967). Studies in the history of Hellenistic drama. London.
Skutsch, O. (1968). Studia Enniana. London.
Skydsgaard, J. E. (1968). Varro the scholar. Copenhagen.
Slater, D. A. (1912). ‘Was the Fourth Eclogue written to celebrate the marriage of Octavia to Mark Antony?’, C.R. 26: 114.
Sluiter, Th. H. (1949). (ed.). Octavia fabula praetexta. Leiden.
Small, S. G. P. (1959). ‘The Arms of Turnus: Aeneid. 7. 783–92’, T.A.Ph.A. 90: 243f.
Smith, K. F. (1913). (ed.). The Elegies of Albius Tibullus. New York.
Solmsen, F. (1948). ‘Propertius and Horace’, C.Ph. 43: 105–9.
Sommer, R. (1926). ‘T. Pomponius Atticus und Ciceros Werke’, Hermes 61: 389–422.
Sparrow, J. (1931). Half-lines and repetitions in Virgil. Oxford.
Speyer, W. (1971). Die literarische Fälschung im heidnischen und christlichen Altertum. Ein Versuch ihrer Deutung. Munich.
Steele, R. B. (1933). The Nux, Maecenas and Consolatio ad Liviam. Nashville.
Steyns, D. (1906). Étude sur les métaphores et les comparaisons dans les oeuvres en prose de Sénèque le philosophe. Gand.
Stroh, W. (1968). ‘Ein missbrauchtes Distichon Ovids’, in Albrecht, M. and Zinn, E. (eds.), Ovid 567–80. Darmstadt.
Stroh, W. (1971). Die römische Liebeselegie als werbende Dichtung. Amsterdam.
Strzelecki, L. (1935). De Naeviano ‘Belli Punici’ carmine quaestiones selectae. Krakow.
Suerbaum, W. (1968). Untersuchungen zur Selbstdarstellung älterer römischer Dichter, Livius Andronicus, Naevius, Ennius. Hildesheim.
Sullivan, J. P. (1963). (ed.). Critical essays on Roman literature. Satire. London.
Summers, W. C. (1910). Select letters of Seneca. London.
Süss, W. (1965). ‘Cicero: eine Einführung in seine philosophischen Schriften’, Abh. Mainz Geistes- und Sozialw. Kl. 5: 210–385. Wiesbaden 1966.
Syme, R. (1939). The Roman revolution. Oxford.
Syme, R. (1958). Tacitus. 2 vols. Oxford.
Tandoi, V. (1969). ‘Il ricordo di Stazio “dolce poeta” nella sat. 7 di Giovenale’, Maia 21: 102–22.
Tarn, W. W. (1932). ‘Alexander Helios and the golden age’, J.R.S. 22: 135–60.
Tarn, W. W. (1948). Alexander the Great, I Narrative; II Sources and Studies. Cambridge.
Taylor, L. R. (1937). ‘The opportunities for dramatic performances in the time of Plautus and Terence’, T.A.Ph.A. 68: 284–304.
Taylor, L. R. (1949). Party politics in the age of Caesar. Berkeley & Los Angeles.
Thompson, L. and Bruère, R. T. (1968). ‘Lucan's use of Virgilian reminiscence’, C.Ph. 63: 1–21.
Thulin, C. (1906). Italische sakrale Poesie und Prosa. Berlin.
Till, R. (1936). Die Sprache Catos. Philologus Suppl.-Band xxviii, Heft 2.
Tillyard, E. M. (1943). The Elizabethan world picture. London.
Townend, G. B. (1961). ‘Traces in Dio Cassius of Cluvius, Aufidius, and Pliny’, Hermes 89: 227–48.
Townend, G. B. (1964). ‘Cluvius Rufus in the Histories of Tacitus’, A.J.Ph. 85: 337–77.
Townend, G. B. (1969). ‘Some problems of punctuation in the Latin hexameter’, C.Q. n.s. 19: 330–44.
Townend, G. B. (1973). ‘The literary substrata to Juvenal's satires’. J.R.S. 63: 148–60.
Toynbee, J. M. C. (1971). Death and burial in the Roman world. London.
Traina, A. (1970). Vortit barbare. Le traduzioni poetiche da Livio Andronico a Cicerone. Rome.
Tränkle, H. (1967). ‘Neoterische Kleinigkeiten’, Mus.Helv. 24: 87–103.
Trendall, A. D. (1967). Phlyax vases. B.I.C.S. Suppl. xix. 2nd edn. London.
Trillitzsch, W. (1971). Seneca im literarischen Urteil der Antike. Darstellung und Sammlung der Zeugnisse. 2 vols. Amsterdam.
Turner, E. G. (1968). Greek papyri: an introduction. Oxford.
Turner, E. G. (1971). Greek manuscripts of the ancient world. Oxford.
Tyrrell, R. Y. and Purser, L. C. (1933). The correspondence of Cicero vi. 2nd edn. Dublin.
Valéry, P. (1962). ‘Variations sur les Bucoliques’, Oeuvres 1: 207–22.
van de Woestijne, P. (1929). ‘Haud mollia iussa’, R.B.Ph. 8: 523–30.
van Groningen, B. A. (1963). ‘Ἔκδοσιζ’, Mnemosyne 4.16: 1–17.
Van Rooy, C. A. (1965). Studies in classical satire and related literary theory. Leiden.
Van Sickle, J. (1975). ‘The new erotic fragment of Archilochus’, Quadri Urbinati di cultura classica 20: 123–56.
Vessey, D. W. T. C. (1970). ‘Statius and Antimachus: a review of the evidence’, Philologus 114: 118–43.
Vessey, D. W. T. C. (1972). ‘Aspects of Statius' epithalamion: Silvae 1.2’, Mnemosyne 4.25: 172–87.
Vessey, D. W. T. C. (1972–3). ‘The myth of Falernus in Silius, Punica 7’, C.J. 68: 240–6.
Vessey, D. W. T. C. (1973). Statius and the Thebaid. Cambridge.
Vessey, D. W. T. C. (1975). ‘Silius Italicus: the shield of Hannibal’, A.J.Ph. 96: 391–405.
Warmington, B. H. (1957). Remains of Old Latin III: Lucilius, The Twelve Tables. 2nd edn. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Waszink, J.-H. (1950). ‘The Proem of the Annales of Ennius’, Mnemosyne 3. 3: 215–40.
Waszink, J.-H. (1972). ‘Zum Anfangsstadium der römischen Literatur’, Temporini, H., Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (Berlin, 1972–) 1.2, 869–927.
Watson, A. (1971). Roman private law around 200 B.C. Edinburgh.
Watts, W. J. (1971). ‘The birthplaces of Latin writers’, G. & R. n.s. 18: 91–101.
Welsford, E. (1935). The Fool, his social and literary history. London.
Wendel, C. (1949). Die griechisch-römische Buchbeschreibung verglichen mit der des Vorderen Orients. Halle.
Wendel, C. (1954). ‘Bibliothek’, Reallexicon für Antike und Christentum (Stuttgart, 1941–) II 664–88.
Wessner, P. (1929). ‘Lucan, Statius und Juvenal bei den römischen Grammatikern’, P.Ph.W. 49: 296–303, 328–35.
West, D. A. (1969). ‘Multiple-correspondence similes in the Aeneid’, J.R.S. 59: 40–9.
Westendorp Boerma, R. E. H. (1949). (ed.). P. Vergili Maronis Catalepton. 2 vols, (vol. 11 1963). Assen.
Westendorp Boerma, R. (1958). ‘Virgil's debt to Catullus’, Acta Classica 1: 55f.
White, P. (1974). ‘The presentation and dedication of the Silvae and the Epigrams’, J.R.S. 64: 40–61.
Wiedemann, T. (1975). ‘The political background to Ovid's Tristia 2’, C.Q. n.s. 25: 264–71.
Wiesen, D. (1963). ‘Juvenal's moral character, an introduction’, Latomus 22: 440–71.
Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, U. von (1924). Hellenistiche Dichtung. 2 vols. Berlin.
Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, U. (1928). Erinnerungen 1848–1914. Leipzig.
Wili, W. (1947). ‘Die literarischen Beziehungen des Properz zu Horaz’, Festschrift Tiéche. Bern.
Wilkinson, L. P. (1955). Ovid recalled. Cambridge.
Wilkinson, L. P. (1963). Golden Latin artistry. Cambridge.
Wilkinson, L. P. (1969). The Georgics of Virgil: a critical survey.
Williams, G. W. (1956). ‘Some problems in the construction of Plautus' Pseudolus’, Hermes 84: 424–55.
Williams, G. W. (1958). ‘Evidence for Plautus' workmanship in the Miles Gloriosus’, Hermes 86: 79–105.
Williams, G. W. (1968). Tradition and originality in Roman poetry. Oxford.
Williams, R. D. (1960), (ed.). Virgil, Aeneid V. Oxford.
Williams, R. D. (1961). ‘The function and structure of Virgil's Catalogue in Aeneid 7’, C.Q. n.s. 11: 146–53.
Williams, R. D. (1962). (ed.). Virgil, Aeneid III. Oxford.
Williams, R. D. (1963). ‘Virgil and the Odyssey’, Phoenix 17: 266f.
Williams, R. D. (1972). ‘The pageant of Roman heroes’, in Cicero and Virgil: Studies in honour of Harold Hunt. Amsterdam.
Williamson, G. (1951). The Senecan amble: prose form from Bacon to Collier. Chicago.
Wimmel, W. (1960). Kallimachos in Rom. Hermes Einzelschrift XVI. Wiesbaden.
Wingo, E. O. (1972). Latin punctuation in the classical age. The Hague & Paris.
Winterbottom, M. (1974). (ed.). The Elder Seneca. Declamations. 2 vols. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass. & London). London & Cambridge, Mass.
Wirszubski, C. (1950). Libertas as a political idea at Rome during the late Republic and early Principate. Cambridge.
Wiseman, T. P. (1969). Catullan questions. Leicester.
Wissowa, G. (1917). ‘Das Prooemium von Vergils Georgica’, Hermes 52: 92–104.
Wright, J. (1974). Dancing in chains: the stylistic unity of the comoedia palliata. Papers and monographs of the American Academy in Rome xxv. Rome.
Zetzel, J. E. G. (1973). ‘Emendavi ad Tironem: some notes on scholarship in the second century A.D.’, H.S.C.Ph. 77: 215–43.
Zieliński, Th. (1904). Das Clauselgesetz in Ciceros Reden: Grundzüge einer oratorischen Rhythmik. Philologus Suppl. -Band IX 589–875.
Zwierlein, O. (1966). Die Rezitationsdramen Senecas. Meisenheim am Glan.