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    The Cambridge History of Japanese Literature
    • Online ISBN: 9781139245869
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869
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Book description

The Cambridge History of Japanese Literature provides, for the first time, a history of Japanese literature with comprehensive coverage of the premodern and modern eras in a single volume. The book is arranged topically in a series of short, accessible chapters for easy access and reference, giving insight into both canonical texts and many lesser known, popular genres, from centuries-old folk literature to the detective fiction of modern times. The various period introductions provide an overview of recurrent issues that span many decades, if not centuries. The book also places Japanese literature in a wider East Asian tradition of Sinitic writing and provides comprehensive coverage of women's literature as well as new popular literary forms, including manga (comic books). An extensive bibliography of works in English enables readers to continue to explore this rich tradition through translations and secondary reading.

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Page 1 of 4


  • 12 - Late courtly romance
    pp 140-156
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869.014
  • View abstract
    Summary
    For all periods of premodern Japanese literature, and indeed, for all premodern literatures, what survives is only a portion of the writings that were produced, but this situation is more extreme for the Nara and early Heian periods than for any subsequent point in Japanese history. Until the mid seventh century literacy remained the province of specialist scribes who were employed by the Yamato Kings, rulers from the area of modern Nara and Osaka who presided over a loose federation of local potentates spanning the archipelago from Northern Kyushu to the Kanto region. The importation of Buddhism in the mid to late sixth century introduced new kinds of texts and new modes of literacy, but these too remained narrow, specialized pursuits. The legitimacy of imperial rule by Tenmu's and Jito's successors was supported by a melange of symbols and rituals with complex origins. Similarly, early Japanese poetry and prose drew on a wide range of sources, foreign and domestic.
  • 13 - Premodern commentary on the classical literary canon
    pp 157-160
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869.015
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The earliest extant works of the Japanese tradition date to the early eighth century, during the first decade of the Nara capital. The Kojiki and Nihon shoki are important for their content, a mix of myth, legend, and history, interspersed with poetry, and for the very different styles in which they were written. Kojiki is divided into three books, the first of which describes an early age of the gods, beginning with heaven and earth coming into existence and ending with accounts of the descent of Ninigi. The second book portrays the origins of rule by legendary sovereigns, starting with Jinmu, and describes the expansion of their realm, following reign-by-reign until that of the fifteenth legendary ruler, Ojin. The third book continues from the sixteenth ruler, Nintoku, to Suiko, whose reign represented the beginning of a new era for eighth-century historians. The Nihon shoki provides historians with a fundamental chronology of events in early Japan, especially for the seventh century.
  • 14 - ThePillow Bookof Sei Shōnagon
    pp 161-164
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869.016
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Kayo first appeared as a literary category in the early twentieth century and was used to describe the songs of the Kojiki and the Nihon shoki to emphasize the view that they were oral songs dating from a period prior to the use of Chinese writing. The common poetic theme in both the Kojiki and the Nihon shoki is that of the ruler's marriage, which accounts for half of the songs in the Kojiki and one-third of the songs in the Nihon shoki. The Kojiki in fact has no songs at all after the sixth century and 88 songs out of its total of 112 appear in only six reigns, those of Jinmu, Yamato Takeru's father Keiko, Ojin, Nintoku, Ingyo, and Yuryaku. The Kojiki and the Nihon shoki are mytho-historical narratives of the formation of the imperial realm of Yamato, told from an impersonal perspective that is located outside the world of the text.
  • 15 - Heian literary diaries: fromTosa nikkitoSarashina nikki
    pp 165-175
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869.017
  • View abstract
    Summary
    In discussions of early Japanese literature the term usually refers to the five "old gazetteers", which are the only substantial survivors of dozens of stable works compiled in response to a central government order in 713. This chapter focuses on the five relatively intact "old fudoki", but it is important to remember that the surviving fragments are essential to understanding the scope and content of the genre; they contain some of the most interesting and oft-cited stories from the fudoki corpus. The fudoki contain much material of local origin, but it is filtered through the outlook of the central elite, either directly because provincial officials from the capital worked as compilers, or indirectly because editors with peripheral origins catered to metropolitan concerns. Only one gazetteer survives in a complete manuscript. The remaining four old fudoki include one that is missing its introduction and at least one district and three abridgements: Hitachi province and two from Kyushu, Bungo and Hizen.
  • 16 - The Heian Academy: literati culture from Minamoto no Shitagō to Ōe no Masafusa
    pp 176-183
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869.018
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Manyoshu is Japan's oldest extant anthology of vernacular verse and the most revered repository of its classical poetic tradition. Just as Kojiki and Nihon shoki were compiled with the aid of earlier histories that do not survive, Manyoshu drew material from numerous other lost Japanese anthologies that are cited in its pages. The anthology was compiled during the greatest period of social change in premodern Japanese history. Manyoshu begins with a courting verse for a maiden gathering herbs on a hillside; it was purported to have been composed by Emperor Yuryaku, who was remembered as an exemplar. From the accession in 629 of the ruler known as Emperor Jomei, attributions of authorship gain historical plausibility; the number of poems markedly increases. Jomei ascended the throne after the death of the female sovereign Suiko, the last ruler represented in the Kojiki. The characterization of Manyoshu as a text that was widely read through the centuries is a modern myth.
  • 17 - Heian canons of Chinese poetry:Wakan rōeishūand Bai Juyi
    pp 184-187
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHO9781139245869.019
  • View abstract
    Summary
    In contrast to Western antiquity, poetry anthologies have been a prominent form of literary production in East Asia. This ideology of anthologization fit the needs of the early Japanese state. In Japan the tradition of imperial anthologies, prefigured by the eighth-century Kaifuso, was pioneered by the three ninth-century kanshi anthologies and continued in the line of twenty-one imperial waka anthologies from the Kokinwakashu into the fifteenth century. Sixty years after Kaifuso, Emperor Saga and his successor Junna, both sons of Emperor Kanmu, the founder of the Heian capital, commissioned three imperial anthologies in a short period of thirteen years: Ryounshu, Bunka shureishu, and Keikokushu. Saga vigorously promoted literature. The early Sino-Japanese anthologies represent the foundations of court poetry in Japan and show the importance of kanshi both as a domestic and cross-cultural medium of communication and entertainment. The early Sino-Japanese anthologies highlight kanshi as a transnational skill and a medium of cross-cultural communication.

Page 1 of 4


The following are recommended readings of translations and secondary sources in English arranged according to the structure of this book. All English-language sources and works cited in the individual chapters appear here. In a number of cases entries appear in more than one section. In the modern section, limitations on space precluded a comprehensive listing of translations of modern novels.

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Brazell, Karen, ed. Traditional Japanese Theater: An Anthology of Plays. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1998.
Brower, Robert H., and Miner, Earl. Japanese Court Poetry. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1961.
Carter, Steven. Traditional Japanese Poetry: An Anthology. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1991.
Friday, Karl, ed. Japan Emerging: Premodern History to 1850. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2012.
Katō, Shūichi. A History of Japanese Literature. Vol. 1, The First Thousand Years. Trans. Chibbett, David. Tokyo: Kodansha International, 1979.
Kawamoto, Kōji. Poetics of Japanese Verse. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 2000.
Keene, Donald, ed. Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century. New York: Grove Press, 1955.
Keene, Donald, ed. Seeds in the Heart: Japanese Literature from Earliest Times to the Late Sixteenth Century. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.
Kornicki, Peter. The Book in Japan. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1998.
McCullough, Helen, ed. Classical Japanese Prose: An Anthology. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1990.
Miner, Earl, ed. Principles of Classical Japanese Literature. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1985.
Miner, Earl, Odagiri, Hiroko, and Morrell, Robert. Princeton Companion to Classical Japanese Literature. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1985.
Morris, Mark. “Waka and Form, Waka and History.” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 46, no. 2 (Dec. 1986): 551610.
Piggott, Joan R. et al., ed. Dictionnaire des sources du Japon classique/Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan. Bibliothèque de l’Institut des Hautes Études Japonaises. Paris: Collège de France, Institut des Hautes Études Japonaises, 2006.
Plutschow, Herbert Eugen. Chaos and Cosmos: Ritual in Early and Medieval Japanese Literature. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1990.
Pollack, David. The Fracture of Meaning: Japan’s Synthesis of China from the Eighth through the Eighteenth Centuries. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1986.
Sakaki, Atsuko. Obsessions with the Sino-Japanese Polarity in Japanese Literature. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2008.
Shirane, Haruo, ed. Early Modern Japanese Literature: An Anthology, 1600–1900. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002.
Shirane, Haruo, ed. Traditional Japanese Literature: An Anthology, Beginnings to 1600. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.
Shirane, Haruo, ed. Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012.
Shirane, Haruo, and Suzuki, Tomi, ed. Inventing the Classics: Modernity, National Identity, and Japanese Literature. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000.
Shirane, Haruo et al., eds. Sekai e hiraku waka: gengo, kyōdōtai, jendā / Waka Opening Up to the World: Language, Community, and Gender. Tokyo: Benseisha, 2012.
Wixted, Timothy. A Handbook to Classical Japanese. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University East Asia Program, 2006.
Brown, Delmer, ed. The Cambridge History of Japan. Vol. I, Ancient Japan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
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Cranston, Edwin. Waka Anthology. Vol. 1, The Gem-Glistening Cup. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993.
Duthie, Torquil. Man’yōshū and the Imperial Imagination in Early Japan. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2014.
Ebersole, Gary L. Ritual Poetry and the Politics of Death in Early Japan. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1989.
Farris, William Wayne. Sacred Texts and Buried Treasures: Issues in the Historical Archaeology of Ancient Japan. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 1998.
Frydman, Joshua. “Uta Mokkan: A History of Early Japanese Poetry through Inscription.” Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 2014.
Inoue, Nobutaka, ed. Shinto: A Short History. London: Routledge Curzon, 2003.
Konishi, Jin’ichi. A History of Japanese Literature. Vol. 1, The Archaic and Ancient Ages. Ed. Miner, Earl, trans. Gatten, Aileen and Teele, Nicholas. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1984.
Lurie, David B. Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the History of Writing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2011.
Ooms, Herman. Imperial Politics and Symbolics in Ancient Japan: The Tenmu Dynasty, 650–800. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2009.
Piggott, Joan R. The Emergence of Japanese Kingship. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1997.
Aston, W.G., trans. Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697. Rutland, VT and Tokyo: Charles E. Tuttle, 1972. (Original 1896, 2 vols.)
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Bentley, John R. Historiographical Trends in Early Japan. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2002.
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Burns, Susan L. Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.
Como, Michael. Shōtoku: Ethnicity, Ritual, and Violence in the Japanese Buddhist Tradition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
Heldt, Gustav. The Kojiki: An Account of Ancient Matters. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.
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Nakamura, Kyoko Motomochi, trans. Miraculous Stories from the Japanese Buddhist Tradition: The Nihon Ryōiki of the Monk Kyōkai. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1973.
Philippi, Donald. Kojiki. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 1968.
Philippi, Donald. Norito: A Translation of the Ancient Japanese Ritual Prayers. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1990. (Reprint of 1959 edition published by Kokugakuin University.)
Sakamoto, Tarō. The Six National Histories of Japan. Trans. Brownlee, John S.. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1991. (Translation of Rikkokushi, Yoshikawa kōbunkan, 1970.)
Sansom, George B.The Imperial Edicts in the Shoku Nihongi.” Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan 2, no. 1 (1924): 540.
Tanabe, George, ed. Religions of Japan in Practice. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999.
Watson, Burton. Record of Miraculous Events in Japan: The Nihon ryōiki. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013.
Duthie, Torquil. “Poetry and Kingship in Ancient Japan.” Ph.D. diss., Columbia University, 2005.
Morris, Mark. “Japanese Folksong and Song in Early Japan: An Introduction.” Ph.D. diss., Harvard University, 1976.
Aoki, Michiko Y. Records of Wind and Earth: A Translation of Fudoki with Introduction and Commentaries. Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies, 1997.
Carlqvist, Anders. “The Land-Pulling Myth and Some Aspects of Historic Reality.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37, no. 2 (2010): 185222.
Funke, Mark C.Hitachi no Kuni Fudoki.” Monumenta Nipponica 49, no. 1 (1994): 129.
Inoue, Tatsuo. “The Hitachi Fudoki and the Fujiwara.” Trans. Aoki, Michiko. In Piggott, Joan, ed., Capital and Countryside in Japan, 300–1180. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University East Asia Program, 2006.
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Palmer, Edwina. Harima Fudoki: A Record of Ancient Japan Reinterpreted. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2015.
Collins, Kevin. “Integrating Lament and Ritual Pacification in the Man’yōshū Banka Sequence for Tenji Tennō.” Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese 34, no. 1 (April, 2000): 4477.
Commons, Anne. Hitomaro: Poet as God. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2009.
Doe, Paula. A Warbler’s Song in the Dusk: The Life and Work of Ōtomo Yakamochi (718–85). Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982.
Duthie, Torquil. Man’yōshū and the Imperial Imagination in Early Japan. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2014.
Horton, H. Mack. Traversing the Frontier: The Man’yōshū Account of a Japanese Mission to Silla in 736–737. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2012.
Levy, Ian Hideo, trans. The Ten Thousand Leaves: A Translation of the Man’yōshū, Japan’s Premier Anthology of Classical Poetry. Vol. 1. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1981.
Levy, Ian Hideo. Hitomaro and the Birth of Japanese Lyricism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1984.
McCullough, Helen Craig. Kokin Wakashū: The First Imperial Anthology of Japanese Poetry, with “Tosa Nikki” and “Shinsen Waka.” Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1985.
Miller, Roy Andrew. “The Footprints of the Buddha”: An Eighth-Century Old Japanese Poetic Sequence. New Haven, CT: American Oriental Society, 1975.
Miller, Roy Andrew. “The Lost Poetic Sequence of the Priest Manzei.” Monumenta Nipponica 36, no. 2 (1981): 133–72.
Miller, Roy Andrew. “Yamanoe Okura, a Korean Poet in Eighth-Century Japan.” Journal of the American Oriental Society 104, no. 4 (1984): 703–26.
Ono, Hiroshi. “An Outline of Research on the Influence of Chinese Literature in the Man’yōshū.” Trans. Giebel, Rolf W.. Acta Asiatica 77 (1999): 1329.
Pierson, Jan Lodewijk, trans. The Manyōśū. 21 vols. (Vol. 5 with Florenz, K. [1938].) Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1929–64.
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Sieffert, René. The Man’yōshū: The Nippon Gakujutsu Shinkōkai Translation of One Thousand Poems. Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1940; rpt. New York: Columbia University Press, 1965.
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