Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home
Christopher Marlowe in Context
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 2
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Barber, Ros 2018. Marlowe and overreaching: A misuse of stylometry. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities,

    Melnikoff, Kirk and Knutson, Roslyn L. 2018. Christopher Marlowe, Theatrical Commerce, and the Book Trade.

    ×

Book description

A contemporary of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe was one of the most influential early modern dramatists, whose life and mysterious death have long been the subject of critical and popular speculation. This collection sets Marlowe's plays and poems in their historical context, exploring his world and his wider cultural influence. Chapters by leading international scholars discuss both his major and lesser-known works. Divided into three sections, 'Marlowe's works', 'Marlowe's world', and 'Marlowe's reception', the book ranges from Marlowe's relationship with his own audience through to adaptations of his plays for modern cinema. Other contexts for Marlowe include history and politics, religion and science. Discussions of Marlowe's critics and Marlowe's appeal today, in performance, literature and biography, show how and why his works continue to resonate; and a comprehensive further reading list provides helpful suggestions for those who want to find out more.

Reviews

'The present volume is a major addition to the study of Marlowe and is essential reading.'

M. L. Stapleton Source: Renaissance Quarterly

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Page 1 of 2



Page 1 of 2


Further reading

Part i Marlowe’s works

1 Marlowe’s chronology and canon

Rasmussen, Eric. A Textual Companion to Doctor Faustus. Manchester University Press, 1993.
Thomas, Vivien and William Tydeman, eds. Christopher Marlowe: The Plays and Their Sources. London and New York: Routledge, 1994.
Wiggins, Martin. ‘When Did Marlowe Write Dido, Queen of Carthage?Review of English Studies 59 (2008): 521–41.
Wiggins, Martin, in association with Catherine Richardson. British Drama, 1533–1642: A Catalogue. Oxford University Press, 2012– .

2 Marlowe’s magic books: the material text

Brown, Georgia E. ‘The Other Black Arts: Doctor Faustus and the Inky Worlds of Printing and Writing’. In Doctor Faustus: A Critical Guide. Ed. Sara Munson Deats. London and New York: Continuum, 2010. 140–58.
Byville, Eric. ‘How to Do Witchcraft Tragedy with Speech Acts’. Comparative Drama 45 (2011): 1–33.
Chambers, E. K. The Elizabethan Stage. 4 vols. Vol. iii. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1923.
Maguire, Laurie E. ‘Marlovian Texts and Authorship’. In The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 41–54.
Marcus, Leah S. ‘Marlowe in tempore belli’. In War and Words: Horror and Heroism in the Literature of Warfare. Ed. Sara Munson Deats, LaGretta Tallent Lenker, and Merry G. Perry. Lanham and New York: Lexington Books, 2004. 295–316.
Marcus, Leah S. Unediting the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton. London and New York: Routledge, 1996.
Rebhorn, Wayne A. The Emperor of Men’s Minds: Literature and the Renaissance Discourse of Rhetoric. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1995.

3 Marlowe and the limits of rhetoric

Carver, Gordon. ‘The Elizabethan Erotic Narrative: Sex(y) Reading’. Explorations in Renaissance Culture 31 (2005): 107–34.
Cheney, Patrick. Marlowe’s Counterfeit Profession: Ovid, Spenser, Counter-Nationhood. University of Toronto Press, 1997.
Logan, Robert A. Shakespeare’s Marlowe: The Influence of Christopher Marlowe on Shakespeare’s Artistry. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007.
Orgel, Stephen. ‘Musaeus in English’. George Herbert Journal 29:1–2 (2005–6): 67–75.
Rhodes, Neil. The Power of Eloquence and English Renaissance Literature. New York: St Martins Press, 1992.
Weaver, William P.Marlowe’s Fable: Hero and Leander and the Rudiments of Eloquence’. Studies in Philology 105:3 (2008): 388–408.

4 Marlowe and character

Anthony Burgess. A Dead Man in Deptford. London: Hutchinson, 1993.
Ruth Lunney. Marlowe and the Popular Tradition: Innovation in the English Drama before 1595. Manchester University Press, 2002.
Peter Whelan. The School of Night. New York: Josef Weinberger Plays, 1992.

5 Marlowe’s dramatic form

Dollimore, Jonathan. Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. 3rd edn. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.
Kelly, Henry Ansgar. Ideas and Forms of Tragedy from Aristotle to the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press, 1993.
Neill, Michael. Issues of Death: Mortality and Identity in English Renaissance Tragedy. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.
Norland, Howard B. Drama in Early Tudor Britain, 1485–1558. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995.
Silk, M. S. Tragedy and the Tragic. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.
Stern, Tiffany. Documents of Performance in Early Modern England. Cambridge University Press, 2009.

6 Marlowe’s poetic form

Boutcher, Warren. ‘“Who taught thee Rhetoricke to deceive a maid?”: Christopher Marlowe’s Hero and Leander, Juan Boscán’s Leandro, and Renaissance Vernacular Humanism’. Comparative Literature 52:1 (2000): 11–52.
Braden, Gordon. The Classics and English Renaissance Poetry: Three Case Studies. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.
Brown, Georgia E. ‘Breaking the Canon: Marlowe’s Challenge to the Literary Status Quo in Hero and Leander’. In Marlowe, History, and Sexuality: New Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Paul Whitfield White. New York: AMS Press, 1998. 59–75.
Haber, Judith. ‘“True-loves blood”: Narrative and Desire in Hero and Leander’. English Literary Renaissance 28 (1998): 372–86.
Hardie, Philip, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Ovid. Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Hulse, Clark. Metamorphic Verse: The Elizabethan Minor Epic. Princeton University Press, 1981.

7 Marlowe and the Elizabethan theatre audience

Cook, Ann Jennalie. The Privileged Playgoers of Shakespeare’s London. Princeton University Press, 1981.
Dessen, Alan. Elizabethan Stage Conventions and Modern Interpreters. Cambridge University Press, 1984.
Gurr, Andrew. Playgoing in Shakespeare’s London. 3rd edn. Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Harbage, Alfred. Shakespeare’s Audience. New York: Columbia University Press, 1941.
Low, Jennifer A. and Nova Myhill, eds. Imagining the Audience in Early Modern Drama, 1558–1642. New York: Palgrave, 2011.
Whitney, Charles. Early Responses to Renaissance Drama. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

8 Marlowe and classical literature

Bartels, Emily C. ‘Reproducing Africa: Dido, Queene of Carthage and Colonialist Discourse’. In Spectacles of Strangeness: Imperialism, Alienation, and Marlowe. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993. 29–52.
Blissett, William. ‘Lucan’s Caesar and the Elizabethan Villain’. Studies in Philology 53 (1956): 553–75.
Gill, Roma. ‘Marlowe and the Art of Translation’. In ‘A Poet and a Filthy Play-Maker’: New Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Kenneth Friedenreich, Roma Gill, and Constance Brown Kuriyama. New York: AMS Press, 1988. 327–42.
Hooley, Dan. ‘Raising the Dead: Marlowe’s Lucan’. In Translation and the Classic: Identity as Change in the History of Culture. Ed. Alexandra Lianeri and Vander Zajko. Oxford University Press, 2008. 243–60.
Summers, Claude J.Hero and Leander: The Arbitrariness of Desire’. In Constructing Christopher Marlowe. Ed. J. A. Downie and J. T. Parnell. Cambridge University Press, 2000. 133–47.

9 Marlowe’s medievalism

Beckwith, Sarah. Signifying God: Social Relation and Symbolic Act in the York Corpus Christi Cycle. University of Chicago Press, 2001.
Bevington, David. From ‘Mankind’ to Marlowe: Growth of Structure in the Popular Drama of Tudor England. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1962.
Lunney, Ruth. Marlowe and the Popular Tradition: Innovation in the English Drama before 1595. Manchester University Press, 2002.
Muir, Lynette R. Love and Conflict in Medieval Drama: The Plays and Their Legacy. Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Parker, John. The Aesthetics of Antichrist: From Christian Drama to Christopher Marlowe. Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 2007.
Sponsler, Claire. Drama and Resistance: Bodies, Goods, and Theatricality in Late Medieval England. Medieval Cultures 10. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.

10 Marlowe’s libraries: a history of reading

Eamon, William. Science and the Secrets of Nature: Books of Secrets in Medieval and Early Modern Culture. Princeton University Press, 1994.
Eisenstein, Elizabeth L. Divine Art, Infernal Machine: The Reception of Printing in the West from First Impressions to the Sense of an Ending. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.
Johns, Adrian. ‘The Physiology of Reading: Print and the Passions’. In The Nature of the Book: Print and Knowledge in the Making. University of Chicago Press, 1998. 380–443.
Manguel, Alberto. A History of Reading. New York: Penguin, 1997.
Summit, Jennifer. ‘Reading Reformation: The Libraries of Matthew Parker and Edmund Spenser’. In Memory’s Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England. University of Chicago Press, 2008. 101–36.
Wall-Randell, Sarah. ‘Doctor Faustus and the Printer’s Devil’. SEL 48:2 (2008): 259–81.

11 Marlowe’s translations

Cheney, Patrick. Marlowe’s Counterfeit Profession: Ovid, Spenser, Counter-Nationhood. University of Toronto Press, 1997.
James, Heather. ‘The Poet’s Toys: Christopher Marlowe and the Liberties of Erotic Elegy’. Modern Language Quarterly 67:1 (March 2006): 103–27.
Lyne, Raphael. ‘Lyrical Wax in Ovid, Marlowe, and Donne’. In Ovid and the Renaissance Body. Ed. Goran V. Stanivukovic. University of Toronto Press, 2001.
Moulton, Ian Frederick. ‘“Printed Abroad and Uncastrated”: Marlowe’s Elegies with Davies’ Epigrams’. In Marlowe, History, and Sexuality: New Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Paul Whitfield White. New York: AMS Press, 1998.
Stapleton, M. L. Harmful Eloquence: Ovid’s Amores from Antiquity to Shakespeare. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996.
Stapleton, M. L. ‘Marlowe’s First Ovid: “Certaine of Ovids Elegies”’. In Christopher Marlowe the Craftsman: Lives, Stage, and Page. Ed. Sarah K. Scott and M. L. Stapleton. Farnham: Ashgate, 2010. 137–48.

Part i i Marlowe’s world

12 Geography and Marlowe

Gillies, John. Shakespeare and the Geography of Difference. Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Jones, Emrys. ‘“A World of Ground”: Terrestrial Space in Marlowe’s Tamburlaine Plays’. The Yearbook of English Studies 38:1–2, Tudor Literature (2008): 168–82.
Klein, Bernhard. Maps and the Writing of Space in Early Modern England and Ireland. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001.
Sullivan, Garrett. ‘Geography and Identity in Marlowe’. In The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 231–44.
Turner, Henry S. The English Renaissance Stage: Geometry, Poetics, and the Practical Spatial Arts, 1580–1630. Oxford University Press, 2006.
West, Russell. Spatial Representations and the Jacobean Stage: From Shakespeare to Webster. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2002.

13 Marlowe, history, and politics

Adams, Simon L. Leicester and the Court: Essays on Elizabethan Politics. Manchester University Press, 2002.
Briggs, Julia. ‘Marlowe’s Massacre at Paris: A Reconsideration’. RES 34 (1983): 257–78.
Dillon, Anne. The Construction of Martyrdom in the English Catholic Community, 1535–1603. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2011.
Kewes, Paulina. ‘History Plays and the Royal Succession’. In The Oxford Handbook of Holinshed’s Chronicles. Ed. Paulina Kewes, Ian W. Archer, and Felicity Heal. Oxford University Press, 2013. 497–513.
Perry, Curtis. Literature and Favouritism in Early Modern England. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Shagan, Ethan H., ed. Catholics and the ‘Protestant Nation’: Religious Politics and Identity in Early Modern England. Manchester University Press, 2005.

14 Marlowe and social distinction

Cheney, Patrick. ‘Biographical Representations: Marlowe’s Life of the Author’. In Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson: New Directions in Biography. Ed. Takashi Kozuka and J. R. Mulryne. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006. 183–203.
Hardin, Richard F.Irony and Privilege in Marlowe’. Centennial Review 33 (1989): 207–27.
Riggs, David. ‘The Poet in the Play: Life and Art in Tamburlaine and The Jew of Malta’. In Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson: New Directions in Biography. Ed. Takashi Kozuka and J. R. Mulryne. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006. 205–23.
Riggs, David The World of Christopher Marlowe. New York: Henry Holt, 2004.
Scott, Sarah K. and M. L. Stapleton, eds. Christopher Marlowe the Craftsman: Lives, Stage, and Page. Farnham: Ashgate, 2010.
Wilson, Richard. ‘Tragedy, Patronage, and Power’. In The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 207–30.

15 Marlowe, death-worlds, and warfare

Cahill, Patricia A. Unto the Breach: Martial Formations, Historical Trauma, and the Early Modern Stage. Oxford University Press, 2008.
DeSomogyi, Nick. Shakespeare’s Theatre of War. Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998.
Logan, Robert A. ‘Violence, Terrorism, and War in Marlowe’s Tamburlaine Plays’. In War and Words: Horror and Heroism in the Literature of Warfare. Ed. Sara Munson Deats, LaGretta Tallent Lenker, and Merry G. Perry. Lanham and New York: Lexington Books, 2004. 65–81.
Shepard, Alan. Marlowe’s Soldiers: Rhetorics of Masculinity in the Age of the Armada. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002.
Taunton, Nina. 1590s Drama and Militarism: Portrayals of War in Marlowe, Chapman and Shakespeare’s Henry V. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001.
Wilson, Richard. ‘Visible Bullets: Tamburlaine the Great and Ivan the Terrible’. ELH 62:1 (Spring 1995): 47–68.

16 Education, the university, and Marlowe

Curtis, Mark H. Oxford and Cambridge in Transition, 1558–1642. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959.
Feingold, Mordechai. ‘The Occult Tradition in the English Universities of the Renaissance: A Reassessment’. In Occult and Scientific Mentalities of the Renaissance. Ed. Brian Vickers. Cambridge University Press, 1984. 73–94.
Jardine, Lisa. ‘Humanism and the Sixteenth Century Cambridge Arts Course’. History of Education 4 (1975): 16–31.
Jardine, LisaThe Place of Dialectic Teaching in Sixteenth-Century Cambridge’. Studies in the Renaissance 21 (1974): 31–62.
Morgan, Victor. A History of the University of Cambridge. 4 vols. Vol. ii: 1546–1750. Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Riggs, David. The World of Christopher Marlowe. New York: Henry Holt, 2004.

17 Marlowe and the question of will

Bartels, Emily C.The Double Vision of the East: Imperialist Self-Construction in Marlowe’s Tamburlaine Part One’. Renaissance Drama 23 (1992): 3–24.
Burnett, Mark Thornton. Constructing ‘Monsters’ in Shakespearean Drama and Early Modern Culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
Cahill, Patricia. ‘Killing by Computation: Military Mathematics, the Elizabethan Social Body, and Marlowe’s Tamburlaine’. In Arts of Calculation: Quantifying Thought in Early Modern Europe. Ed. David Glimp and Michelle R. Warren, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. 165–86.
Moore, Roger E.The Spirit and the Letter: Marlowe’s Tamburlaine and Elizabethan Religious Radicalism’. Studies in Philology 99:2 (2002): 123–51.
Thomson, Leslie. ‘Marlowe’s Staging of Meaning’. Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 18 (2005): 19–36.
Whitfield, Pam. ‘“Divine Zenocrate”, “Wretched Zenocrate”: Female Speech and Disempowerment in Tamburlaine i’. In Renaissance Papers 2000, ed. T. Howard-Hill and Philip Rollinson (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2000). 87–97.

18 Marlowe and the self

Greenblatt, Stephen. The Swerve: How the World Became Modern. New York: Norton, 2011.
Hunter, Robert G. Shakespeare and the Mystery of God’s Judgments. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1976.
Nicholl, Charles. The Reckoning: The Death of Christopher Marlowe. University of Chicago Press, 1995.
Riggs, David. The World of Christopher Marlowe. New York: Henry Holt, 2004.
Strier, Richard. The Unrepentant Renaissance: From Petrarch to Shakespeare to Milton. University of Chicago Press, 2011.

19 Race, nation, and Marlowe

Bartels, Emily C. Spectacles of Strangeness: Imperialism, Alienation, and Marlowe. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993.
Floyd-Wilson, Mary. English Ethnicity and Race in Early Modern Drama. Cambridge University Press, 2003.
Hendricks, Margo and Patricia Parker, eds. Women, ‘Race’, and Writing in the Early Modern Period. London: Routledge, 1994.
Iyengar, Sujata. Shades of Difference: Mythologies of Skin Color in Early Modern England. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005.
Loomba, Ania. Shakespeare, Race, and Colonialism. Oxford University Press, 2002.
Spiller, Elizabeth. Reading and the History of Race in the Renaissance. Cambridge University Press, 2011.

20 Marlowe and religion

Lake, Peter. ‘Religious Identities in Shakespeare’s England’. In A Companion to Shakespeare. Ed. David Scott Kastan. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. 57–84.
Patrides, C. A.“The Bloody and Cruell Turke”: The Background of a Renaissance Commonplace’. Studies in the Renaissance 10 (1963): 126–35.
Poole, Kristen. ‘The Devil’s in the Archive: Doctor Faustus and Ovidian Physics’. Renaissance Drama 35 (2006): 191–219.
Riggs, David. ‘Marlowe’s Quarrel with God’. In Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Emily C. Bartels. New York: G. K. Hall, 1997. 39–60.
Daniel Vitkus. Turning Turk: English Theater and the Multicultural Mediterranean, 1570–1630. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

21 Marlowe and queer theory

Chedzgoy, Kate. ‘Marlowe’s Men and Women: Gender and Sexuality’. In The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 245–61.
DiGangi, Mario. ‘Marlowe, Queer Studies, and Renaissance Homoeroticism’. In Marlowe, History, and Sexuality: New Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Paul Whitfield White. New York: AMS Press, 1998. 195–212.
Green, Adam. ‘Gay but not Queer: Toward a Post-Queer Study of Sexuality’. Theory and Society 31:4 (2002): 521–45.
Greenblatt, Stephen. Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. University of Chicago Press, 1980.
Morland, Iain and Annabelle Willox, eds. Queer Theory. New York: Palgrave, 2005.

22 Marlowe and women

Bartels, Emily C. Spectacles of Strangeness: Imperialism, Alienation, and Marlowe. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993.
Bloom, Gina. Voice in Motion: Staging Gender, Shaping Sound in Early Modern England. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.
Findlay, Alison. A Feminist Perspective on Renaissance Drama. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998.
Gibbs, Joanna. ‘Marlowe’s Politic Women’. In Constructing Christopher Marlowe. Ed. J. A. Downie and J. T. Parnell. Cambridge University Press, 2000. 164–76.
Shepherd, Simon. ‘Representing “Women” and Males: Gender Relations in Marlowe’. In Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Richard Wilson. London and New York: Longman, 1999. 62–82.
Tromly, Frederick B. Playing with Desire: Christopher Marlowe and the Art of Tantalization. University of Toronto Press, 1998.

23 Marlowe and the new science

Gillies, John. ‘Tamburlaine and Renaissance Geography’. In Early Modern English Drama: A Critical Companion. Ed. Garrett Sullivan, Patrick Cheney, and Andrew Hadfield. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

24 The professional theatre and Marlowe

Bentley, G. E. The Profession of Dramatist in Shakespeare’s Time 1590–1642. Princeton University Press, 1971.
Bradley, David. From Text to Performance in the Elizabethan Theatre: Preparing the Play for the Stage. Cambridge University Press, 1991.
Hirschfeld, Heather A. Joint Enterprises: Collaborative Drama and the Institutionalization of the English Renaissance Theater. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2004.
Hunter, G. K. English Drama 1586–1642: The Age of Shakespeare. Oxford History of English Literature. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.
Knutson, Roslyn Lander. The Repertory of Shakespeare’s Company 1594–1613. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1991.
Masten, Jeffrey. Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship, and Sexualities in Renaissance Drama. Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Part iII Reception

25 Marlowe in his moment

Downie, J. A. ‘Marlowe: Facts and Fiction’. In Constructing Christopher Marlowe. Ed. J. A. Downie and J. T. Parnell. Cambridge University Press, 2000. 13–29.
Erne, Lukas. ‘Biography, Mythography, and Criticism: The Life and Works of Christopher Marlowe’. Modern Philology 103 (2005): 28–50.
Knutson, Roslyn Lander. Playing Companies and Commerce in Shakespeare’s Time. Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Syme, Holger Schott. ‘The Meaning of Success: Stories of 1594 and Its Aftermath’. Shakespeare Quarterly 61 (2010): 490–525.
Whitney, Charles. Early Responses to Renaissance Drama. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

26 Marlowe and Shakespeare revisited

Cartelli, Thomas. Marlowe, Shakespeare, and the Economy of Theatrical Experience. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991.

27 Marlowe in Caroline theatre

Astington, John. ‘Playing the Man: Acting at the Red Bull and the Fortune’. Early Theatre 9 (2006): 130–43.
Brooke, C. F. Tucker. The Reputation of Christopher Marlowe. Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences 25. New Haven: Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1922.
Lesser, Zachary. Renaissance Drama and the Politics of Publication: Readings in the English Book Trade. Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Munro, Lucy. ‘Marlowe on the Caroline Stage’. Shakespeare Bulletin 27 (2009): 39–50.
Parker, John. ‘Barabas and Charles I’. In Placing the Plays of Christopher Marlowe: Fresh Cultural Contexts. Ed. Sara Munson Deats and Robert A. Logan. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008. 167–81.
Shawcross, John T. ‘Signs of the Times: Christopher Marlowe’s Decline in the Seventeenth Century’. In ‘A Poet and a Filthy Play-Maker’: New Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Kenneth Friedenreich, Roma Gill, and Constance Brown Kuriyama. New York: AMS Press, 1988. 63–71.

28 Marlowe’s literary influence

Dabbs, Thomas. Reforming Marlowe: The Nineteenth-Century Canonization of a Renaissance Dramatist. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press; London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1991.
Hopkins, Lisa. ‘Marlowe’s Reception and Influence’. In The Cambridge Companion to Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 282–96.

29 Marlowe in the movies

Aebischer, Pascale. ‘Renaissance Tragedy on Film: Defying Mainstream Shakespeare’. In The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Tragedy. Ed. Emma Smith and Garrett Sullivan. Cambridge University Press, 2010. 116–31.
Barker, Roberta. Early Modern Tragedy, Gender and Performance, 1984–2000. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
Chedgzoy, Kate. Shakespeare’s Queer Children: Sexual Politics and Contemporary Culture. Manchester University Press, 1995.
Fuller, David. ‘Love or Politics: The Man or the King? Edward II in Modern Performance’. Shakespeare Bulletin 27:1 (Spring 2009): 81–115.
Potter, Lois. ‘Marlowe in Theatre and Film’. The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 262–81.
Willis, Deborah. ‘Marlowe Our Contemporary: Edward II on Stage and Screen’. Criticism 40 (1998): 599–622.

30 Editing Marlowe’s texts

Duxfield, Andrew. ‘Modern Problems of Editing: The Two Texts of Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus’. Literature Compass 2 (2005): n.p.
Maguire, Laurie E. ‘Marlovian Texts and Authorship’. In The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Patrick Cheney. Cambridge University Press, 2004. 41–54.
Marcus, Leah S. Unediting the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton. London and New York: Routledge, 1996.
Murphy, Andrew, ed. The Renaissance Text: Theory, Editing, Textuality. Manchester University Press, 2000.
Orgel, Stephen. ‘What Is an Editor?Shakespeare Studies 24 (1996): 23–46.
Werstine, Paul. ‘Editing after the End of Editing’. Shakespeare Studies 24 (1996): 47–54.

31 Marlowe’s biography

Bakeless, John E. The Tragicall History of Christopher Marlowe. 2 vols. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1942.
Nicholl, Charles. The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe. Rev. edn. London: Vintage, 2002.
Riggs, David. The World of Christopher Marlowe. New York: Henry Holt, 2004.

32 Marlowe and the critics

Burnett, Mark Thornton. ‘Marlowe and the Critics’. In Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Plays. Ed. Mark Thornton Burnett. London: Everyman, 1999. 615–31.
DiGangi, Mario. ‘Marlowe, Queer Studies, and Renaissance Homoeroticism’. In Marlowe, History, and Sexuality: New Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. Ed. Paul Whitfield White. New York: AMS Press, 1998. 195–212.
Logan, Robert A. ‘Marlowe Scholarship and Criticism: The Current Scene’. In Christopher Marlowe the Craftsman: Lives, Stage, and Page. Ed. Sarah K. Scott and M. L. Stapleton. Farnham: Ashgate, 2010. 5–22.
Ribner, Irving. ‘Marlowe and the Critics’. Tulane Drama Review 8:4 (1964): 211–24.
Tydeman, William and Vivien Thomas. Christopher Marlowe: A Guide through the Critical Maze. Bristol Press, 1989.
Wilson, Richard. ‘“Writ in blood”: Marlowe and the New Historicists’. In Constructing Christopher Marlowe. Ed. J. A. Downie and J. T. Parnell. Cambridge University Press, 2000. 116–32.

33 Marlowe now

Hammill, Graham. Sexuality and Form: Caravaggio, Marlowe, and Bacon. University of Chicago Press, 2000.
Lopez, Jeremy. ‘Alleyn Resurrected’. Marlowe Studies: An Annual 1 (2011): 167–80.
Lupton, Julia Reinhard. ‘Shakespace on Marloan’. In Shakespeare without Class: Misappropriations of Cultural Capital. Ed. Donald Hedrick and Bryan Reynolds. New York: Palgrave, 2000. 277–85.
Orgel, Stephen. ‘Tobacco and Boys: How Queer Was Marlowe?GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies 6 (2000): 555–7.
Potter, Lois. ‘What Happened to the Mighty Line? Recent Marlowe Productions’. Shakespeare Bulletin 27:1 (2009): 63–9.
Shepherd, Simon. ‘A Bit of Ruff: Criticism, Fantasy, Marlowe’. Constructing Christopher Marlowe. Ed. J. A. Downie and J. T. Parnell. Cambridge University Press, 2000. 102–15.