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Courts in Latin America
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  • Cited by 10
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Yeğen, Oya 2018. Judicial “empowerment” through constitutional change: the case of Chilean and Turkish Constitutional Courts. Research and Policy on Turkey, Vol. 3, Issue. 1, p. 40.

    2017. World Development Report 2017: Governance and the Law. p. 83.

    Michel, Verónica 2017. The role of prosecutorial independence and prosecutorial accountability in domestic human rights trials. Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 16, Issue. 2, p. 193.

    Dressel, Björn Sanchez-Urribarri, Raul and Stroh, Alexander 2017. The Informal Dimension of Judicial Politics: A Relational Perspective. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 13, Issue. 1, p. 413.

    Llanos, Mariana Tibi Weber, Cordula Heyl, Charlotte and Stroh, Alexander 2016. Informal interference in the judiciary in new democracies: a comparison of six African and Latin American cases. Democratization, Vol. 23, Issue. 7, p. 1236.

    VERSTEEG, MILA and ZACKIN, EMILY 2016. Constitutions Unentrenched: Toward an Alternative Theory of Constitutional Design. American Political Science Review, Vol. 110, Issue. 04, p. 657.

    Dickovick, J. Tyler and Eaton, Kent H. 2013. Latin America’s Resurgent Centre: National Government Strategies after Decentralisation. Journal of Development Studies, Vol. 49, Issue. 11, p. 1453.

    Ginsburg, Tom 2012. Courts and New Democracies: Recent Works. Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 37, Issue. 3, p. 720.

    Sanchez Urribarri, Raul A. 2011. Courts between Democracy and Hybrid Authoritarianism: Evidence from the Venezuelan Supreme Court. Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 36, Issue. 4, p. 854.

    Read, Katherine and Griffiths, Laura 2011. Current Awareness. Legal Information Management, Vol. 11, Issue. 03, p. 214.

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    Courts in Latin America
    • Online ISBN: 9780511976520
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511976520
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Book description

To what extent do courts in Latin America protect individual rights and limit governments? This volume answers these fundamental questions by bringing together today's leading scholars of judicial politics. Drawing on examples from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica and Bolivia, the authors demonstrate that there is widespread variation in the performance of Latin America's constitutional courts. In accounting for this variation, the contributors push forward ongoing debates about what motivates judges; whether institutions, partisan politics and public support shape inter-branch relations; and the importance of judicial attitudes and legal culture. The authors deploy a range of methods, including qualitative case studies, paired country comparisons, statistical analysis and game theory.

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