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Defoe's Politics
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  • Cited by 6
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Payne, Geoffrey 2014. Distemper, Scourge, Invader: Discourse and Plague in Defoe'sA Journal of the Plague Year. English Studies, Vol. 95, Issue. 6, p. 620.


    WATSON, MATTHEW 2013. The eighteenth-century historiographic tradition and contemporary ‘Everyday IPE’. Review of International Studies, Vol. 39, Issue. 01, p. 1.


    Watson, Matthew 2011. Competing Models of Socially Constructed Economic Man: Differentiating Defoe's Crusoe from the Robinson of Neoclassical Economics. New Political Economy, Vol. 16, Issue. 5, p. 609.


    Medraño, José María Durán 2008. Hacia una crítica de la economía política del arte.


    Black, Jeremy 2002. Samuel Johnson in Historical Context.


    Medalie, David 1997. Friday updated:Robinson Crusoeas sub‐text in Gordimer'sJuly's peopleand Coetzee'sfoe. Current Writing, Vol. 9, Issue. 1, p. 43.


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    Defoe's Politics
    • Online ISBN: 9780511519109
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511519109
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Book description

This study of Defoe's politics aims to challenge the critical demand to see Defoe as a 'modern' and to counter misrepresentations of his political writings by restoring them to their seventeenth-century context. Offering a full examination of Defoe's years as a political reporter and journalist (1689–1715), it recovers his traditional, conservative and anti-Lockean ideas on contemporary issues: the origins of society, the role of the people in the establishment of a political society and how monarchies are created and maintained as the means of achieving a beneficent political order. At the heart of Defoe's political imagination, Manuel Schonhorn finds the vision of a warrior-king, derived from sources in the Bible and in ancient and English history. This model illuminates his original reading of Defoe's greatest political fiction, Robinson Crusoe, which emerges less in terms of a family romance, a tract for the rising bourgeoisie or a Lockean parable of government, than as a dramatic re-enactment of Defoe's lifelong political preoccupations concerning society, government and kingship.

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