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Democracy, Accountability, and Representation
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  • Cited by 223
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Ladner, Andreas Keuffer, Nicolas Baldersheim, Harald Hlepas, Nikos Swianiewicz, Pawel Steyvers, Kristof and Navarro, Carmen 2019. Patterns of Local Autonomy in Europe. p. 279.

    Dimova, Gergana 2019. Comparing Strategies of (De)Politicisation in Europe. p. 53.

    Pegram, Tom and Rodriguez, Nataly Herrera 2019. The Inter-American Human Rights System. p. 167.

    Era, Marlon de Luna 2019. Disaster Risk Reduction. p. 173.

    Pavón-Guinea, Andrea 2018. The empirical factors of Twitter adoption by world governments: the impact of regime type and time on diffusion. The Journal of International Communication, Vol. 24, Issue. 1, p. 138.

    Ferland, Benjamin 2018. Party responsiveness to public opinion and party supporters. Party Politics, p. 135406881877788.

    Carammia, Marcello Borghetto, Enrico and Bevan, Shaun 2018. Changing the transmission belt: the programme-to-policy link in Italy between the First and Second Republic. Italian Political Science Review/Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica, Vol. 48, Issue. 3, p. 275.

    WAMPLER, BRIAN and TOUCHTON, MICHAEL 2018. Designing institutions to improve well-being: Participation, deliberation and institutionalisation. European Journal of Political Research,

    Mikulewicz, Michael 2018. Politicizing vulnerability and adaptation: on the need to democratize local responses to climate impacts in developing countries. Climate and Development, Vol. 10, Issue. 1, p. 18.

    Smirnova, Valeria 2018. Why make political finance transparent? Explaining the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO)’s success in reforming national political finance regulation. European Political Science Review, Vol. 10, Issue. 4, p. 565.

    Christensen, Darin and Ejdemyr, Simon 2018. Do Elections Improve Constituency Responsiveness? Evidence from US Cities. Political Science Research and Methods, p. 1.

    Kwon, Hyeok Yong 2018. Government Partisanship and Electoral Accountability: The Effect of Perceived Employment Situation on Partisan Vote Switching. Political Research Quarterly, p. 106591291880489.

    Zweig, Katharina A. Wenzelburger, Georg and Krafft, Tobias D. 2018. On Chances and Risks of Security Related Algorithmic Decision Making Systems. European Journal for Security Research, Vol. 3, Issue. 2, p. 181.

    WESTWOOD, SEAN J. IYENGAR, SHANTO WALGRAVE, STEFAAN LEONISIO, RAFAEL MILLER, LUIS and STRIJBIS, OLIVER 2018. The tie that divides: Cross-national evidence of the primacy of partyism. European Journal of Political Research, Vol. 57, Issue. 2, p. 333.

    Schneider, Christina J. 2018. The Responsive Union.

    Holland, Alisha C. and Incio, José 2018. Imperfect Recall: The Politics of Subnational Office Removals. Comparative Political Studies, p. 001041401879793.

    2018. Urban Planning in the Digital Age. p. 153.

    Hong, Seung-Hun and You, Jong-sung 2018. Limits of regulatory responsiveness: Democratic credentials of responsive regulation. Regulation & Governance, Vol. 12, Issue. 3, p. 413.

    León, Sandra Jurado, Ignacio and Garmendia Madariaga, Amuitz 2018. Passing the buck? Responsibility attribution and cognitive bias in multilevel democracies. West European Politics, Vol. 41, Issue. 3, p. 660.

    Pellegata, Alessandro and Quaranta, Mario 2018. Accountability through government alternation: Economic performance and the conditional role of political institutions in fifty countries, 1990–2015. International Political Science Review, p. 019251211875584.

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Book description

This book examines whether the mechanisms of accountability characteristic of democratic systems are sufficient to induce the representatives to act in the best interest of the represented. The first part of the volume focuses on the role of elections, distinguishing different ways in which they may cause representation. The second part is devoted to the role of checks and balances, between the government and the parliament as well as between the government and the bureaucracy. The contributors of this volume, all leading scholars in the fields of American and comparative politics and political theory, address questions such as, whether elections induce governments to act in the interest of citizens. Are politicians in democracies accountable to voters in future elections? If so, does accountability induce politicians to represent citizens? Does accountability limit or enhance the scope of action of governments? Are governments that violate campaign mandates representative? Overall, the essays combine theoretical discussions, game-theoretic models, case studies, and statistical analyses, within a shared analytical approach and a standardized terminology. The empirical material is drawn from the well established democracies as well as from new democracies.

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