Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home
Democracy and Development
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 993
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Houle, Christian 2019. Social Mobility and Political Instability. Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol. 63, Issue. 1, p. 85.

    Heinrich, Tobias and Loftis, Matt W. 2019. Democracy Aid and Electoral Accountability. Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol. 63, Issue. 1, p. 139.

    Fashagba, Joseph Yinka and Mu’awiyya, Abdullahi 2019. Perspectives on the Legislature and the Prospects of Accountability in Nigeria and South Africa. p. 63.

    Aslam, Ghazia 2019. Decentralization reforms in dictatorial regimes as a survival strategy: Evidence from Pakistan. International Political Science Review, Vol. 40, Issue. 1, p. 126.

    Doorenspleet, Renske 2019. Rethinking the Value of Democracy. p. 201.

    Denk, Thomas and Lehtinen, Sarah 2019. State-Formation and Democratization. p. 109.

    Krasnozhon, Leonid and Bunyk, Mykola 2019. Liberalism and great upheaval: What did classical liberals do in the Tsarist Russia?. Constitutional Political Economy,

    Thompson, Mark R. 2019. Authoritarian Modernism in East Asia. p. 41.

    de Kadt, Daniel and Wittels, Stephen B. 2019. Democratization and Economic Output in Sub-Saharan Africa. Political Science Research and Methods, Vol. 7, Issue. 1, p. 63.

    Li, Rowena 2019. Advanced Methodologies and Technologies in Network Architecture, Mobile Computing, and Data Analytics. p. 1687.

    Bertelli, Anthony M 2019. Public Goods, Private Partnerships, and Political Institutions. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Vol. 29, Issue. 1, p. 67.

    Tworzecki, Hubert 2019. Poland: A Case of Top-Down Polarization. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 681, Issue. 1, p. 97.

    Seawright, Jason 2019. Statistical analysis of democratization: a constructive critique. Democratization, Vol. 26, Issue. 1, p. 21.

    Thompson, Mark R. 2019. Authoritarian Modernism in East Asia. p. 1.

    Coelho, Vera Schattan P. and Dias, Marcelo 2019. Paths of Inequality in Brazil. p. 183.

    Coppedge, Michael and Kuehn, David 2019. Introduction: absorbing the four methodological disruptions in democratization research?. Democratization, Vol. 26, Issue. 1, p. 1.

    Tsunekawa, Keiichi and Todo, Yasuyuki 2019. Emerging States at Crossroads. p. 1.

    Doorenspleet, Renske 2019. Rethinking the Value of Democracy. p. 29.

    Doorenspleet, Renske 2019. Rethinking the Value of Democracy. p. 1.

    Brusis, Martin and Zweynert, Joachim 2018. Politik und Wirtschaft. p. 89.

    ×

Book description

Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? These two questions are examined by looking at the experience of 135 countries between 1950 and 1990. Descriptive information, statistical analyses, and historical narratives are interwoven to gain an understanding of the dynamic of political regimes and their impact on economic development and other aspects of material welfare. The findings, several most surprising, dispel any notion of a trade-off between democracy and development. Economic development does not generate democracies but democracies are much more likely to survive in wealthy societies. Political regimes have no impact on the growth of total national incomes, while political instability affects growth only in dictatorships. Per capita incomes grow faster in democracies since population increases faster under dictatorships. In general, political regimes have more of an effect on demography than on economics.

Reviews

‘There is a lot to be learned from this excellent piece of research …’.

Source: Western European Politics

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed