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Dreaming in the Middle Ages
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  • Cited by 19
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Barnett, John 2015. Contemporary Christian Dream Interpretation: Awakening the Interest of Practical Theologians. Practical Theology, Vol. 8, Issue. 2, p. 130.


    Cayley, Emma 2015. Between Manuscript and Print: Literary Reception in Late Medieval France. The Case of the Songe de la Pucelle. Fudan Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Vol. 8, Issue. 2, p. 137.


    Elias, Natanela 2015. The Gnostic Paradigm.


    Zeeman, Nicolette 2014. A Concise Companion to Psychoanalysis, Literature, and Culture.


    MacLehose, William 2013. Sleepwalking, Violence and Desire in the Middle Ages. Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry, Vol. 37, Issue. 4, p. 601.


    Nell, Werner 2012. Religion and spirituality in contemporary dreams. HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies, Vol. 68, Issue. 1,


    2012. Anglo-Saxon Keywords.


    Forshaw, Peter J. 2011. Conversations with Angels.


    Davenport, W. A. 2010. Dreams in Gower'sConfessio Amantis. English Studies, Vol. 91, Issue. 4, p. 374.


    Fradenburg, L O Aranye 2010. Beauty and Boredom inThe Legend of Good Women. Exemplaria, Vol. 22, Issue. 1, p. 65.


    Lohmann, Roger Ivar 2010. How Evaluating Dreams Makes History: Asabano Examples. History and Anthropology, Vol. 21, Issue. 3, p. 227.


    Fradenburg, Aranye 2009. The Post-Historical Middle Ages.


    Levin, Carole 2008. Dreaming the English Renaissance.


    Blanch, Robert 2007. From the Black Death to AIDS: Cinematic Visions and Community inBook of Days. Extrapolation, Vol. 48, Issue. 2, p. 398.


    Crocker, Holly A. 2007. Chaucer's Visions of Manhood.


    McCormick, Betsy 2007. Cultural Studies of the Modern Middle Ages.


    Phillips, Helen 2007. A Companion to Medieval English Literature and Culture c.1350-c.1500.


    Davis, Patricia M. 2005. Dreams and Visions in the Anglo-Saxon Conversion to Christianity.. Dreaming, Vol. 15, Issue. 2, p. 75.


    Kruger, Steven F. 1998. Dream space and masculinity. Word & Image, Vol. 14, Issue. 1-2, p. 11.


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    Dreaming in the Middle Ages
    • Online ISBN: 9780511518737
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511518737
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Book description

This wide-ranging study examines the role of the dream in medieval culture with reference to philosophical, legal and theological writings as well as literary and autobiographical works. Stephen Kruger studies the development of theories of dreaming, from the Neoplatonic and patristic writers to late medieval re-interpretations, and shows how these theories relate to autobiographical accounts and to more popular treatments of dreaming. He considers previously neglected material including one important dream vision by Nicole Oresme, and arrives at a new understanding of this literary genre, and of medieval attitudes to dreaming in general.

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