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El Niño and the Southern Oscillation
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  • Cited by 41
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    El Niño and the Southern Oscillation
    • Online ISBN: 9780511573125
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511573125
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Book description

The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon is a recurrent feature of the climate in tropical regions. In this volume leading experts summarize information gained over the past decade concerning diverse aspects of ENSO, which have led to marked improvements in our ability to forecast its development months or seasons in advance. This volume compares ENSO's modern morphology and variability with its recent historic and prehistoric behaviour. It expands and updates Diaz and Markgraf's earlier volume El Niño: Historical and Paleoclimatic Aspects of the Southern Oscillation (1992, Cambridge University Press). The volume will be of importance to a broad range of scientists in meteorology, oceanography, hydrology, geosciences, ecology, public health, emergency management response and mitigation, and decision-making. It will also be used as a supplementary textbook and reference source in graduate courses in environmental studies.

Reviews

‘The editors express the hope that this book makes a contribution toward a broader understanding of the ENSO phenomenon, by providing an updated synthesis of some of the significant accomplishments toward this goal, and by highlighting some of the areas where gaps in our knowledge still exists. Their hopes have been realized.’

Mark A. Cane Source: EOS

‘… a useful book for the university library or climate scientist with a major interest in El Niño or long-term climate variability.’

Grant Bigg Source: Weather

‘ … an excellent reference and guide to those in research as well as policy areas.’

Source: Holocene

‘… ideally suited to anyone interested in reviewing recent developments in knowledge of climate variability and the role of the El Niño phenomenon.’

Source: World Meteorological Organization Bulletin

‘… a wealth of information in a well edited and readable way …’.

Andreas Hense Source: Meteorolische Zeitschrift

'This is an admirable publication and would be ideal for anyone who wishes to develop an excellent grounding in past, present and future ENSO activity.'

Source: Journal of Quaternary Science

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