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    English as a Contact Language
    • Online ISBN: 9780511740060
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511740060
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Book description

Recent developments in contact linguistics suggest considerable overlap of branches such as historical linguistics, variationist sociolinguistics, pidgin/creole linguistics, language acquisition, etc. This book highlights the complexity of contact-induced language change throughout the history of English by bringing together cutting-edge research from these fields. Special focus is on recent debates surrounding substratal influence in earlier forms of English (particularly Celtic influence in Old English), on language shift processes (the formation of Irish and overseas varieties) but also on dialects in contact, the contact origins of Standard English, the notion of new epicentres in World English, the role of children and adults in language change as well as transfer and language learning. With contributions from leading experts, the book offers fresh and exciting perspectives for research and is at the same time an up-to-date overview of the state of the art in the respective fields.

Reviews

'This multifaceted volume demonstrates the important role of language contact and dialect contact in the development of English and its many current varieties, providing new insights into questions of who were the agents of change and what were the processes involved. The list of authors of the eighteen chapters reads like a who’s who in contact linguistics and the history of English. Highly recommended reading for anyone interested in these areas.'

Jeff Siegel - University of New England, Australia

'The volume is highly recommended reading for beginning and experienced scholars in (English) contact linguistics, English variational linguistics, language typology, and beyond.'

Helen Aristar-Dry Source: The Linguist List (linguistlist.org)

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