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The Enlightenment's Fable
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  • Cited by 31
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Funk, Wolfgang 2017. ‘Happy amicable co-operation’: mutual aid, anarchism and the image of the bee in the work of Louisa Sarah Bevington. European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 21, Issue. 1, p. 61.


    Sagar, Paul 2017. Beyond sympathy: Smith’s rejection of Hume’s moral theory. British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Vol. 25, Issue. 4, p. 681.


    Grewal, David Singh 2016. The Political Theology ofLaissez-Faire: FromPhiliato Self-Love in Commercial Society. Political Theology, Vol. 17, Issue. 5, p. 417.


    Randall, David 2016. Adam Smith’s Mixed Prudence and the Economy of the Public Sphere. Political Studies, Vol. 64, Issue. 2, p. 335.


    Mortimer, Sarah 2015. A Companion to Intellectual History. p. 345.

    Verburg, Rudi 2015. Bernard Mandeville's vision of the social utility of pride and greed. The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Vol. 22, Issue. 4, p. 662.


    Kontler, László 2014. Translations, Histories, Enlightenments. p. 95.

    Knott, Martin Otero 2014. Mandeville on Governability. Journal of Scottish Philosophy, Vol. 12, Issue. 1, p. 19.


    Kontler, László 2014. Translations, Histories, Enlightenments. p. 19.

    Heath, Eugene 2014. Carrying Matters Too Far? Mandeville and the Eighteenth-Century Scots on the Evolution of Morals. Journal of Scottish Philosophy, Vol. 12, Issue. 1, p. 95.


    Buchan, Bruce and Hill, Lisa 2014. An Intellectual History of Political Corruption. p. 125.

    Reid, Pauline 2014. Specters of Smith: Adam Smith's “Invisible Hand” and Charles Dickens'sLittle Dorrit. Lit: Literature Interpretation Theory, Vol. 25, Issue. 4, p. 312.


    ROBERTSON, JOHN 2013. SACRED HISTORY AND POLITICAL THOUGHT: NEAPOLITAN RESPONSES TO THE PROBLEM OF SOCIABILITY AFTER HOBBES. The Historical Journal, Vol. 56, Issue. 01, p. 1.


    LUBAN, DANIEL 2012. ADAM SMITH ON VANITY, DOMINATION, AND HISTORY. Modern Intellectual History, Vol. 9, Issue. 02, p. 275.


    SCHMIDT, ALEXANDER 2012. SCHOLARSHIP, MORALS AND GOVERNMENT: JEAN-HENRI-SAMUEL FORMEY'S AND JOHANN GOTTFRIED HERDER'S RESPONSES TO ROUSSEAU'S FIRST DISCOURSE. Modern Intellectual History, Vol. 9, Issue. 02, p. 249.


    Ahnert, Thomas 2011. Character, Self, and Sociability in the Scottish Enlightenment. p. 67.

    Breuninger, Scott 2010. Recovering Bishop Berkeley. p. 35.

    O’Brien, Karen 2010. The History of British Women’s Writing, 1690–1750. p. 19.

    Jones, David W. 2009. Emotion. p. 212.

    SLACK, PAUL 2009. Material progress and the challenge of affluence in seventeenth-century England. The Economic History Review, Vol. 62, Issue. 3, p. 576.


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    The Enlightenment's Fable
    • Online ISBN: 9780511584749
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511584749
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Book description

The apprehension of society as an aggregation of self-interested individuals, connected only by bonds of envy, competition, and exploitation, is a dominant modern concern, but one first systematically articulated during the European Enlightenment. The Enlightenment's 'Fable' approaches this problem from the perspective of the challenge offered to inherited traditions of morality and social understanding by the Anglo-Dutch physician, satirist and philosopher, Bernard Mandeville. Mandeville's infamous paradoxical maxim 'private vices, public benefits' profoundly disturbed his contemporaries, while his Fable of the Bees had a decisive influence on David Hume, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith and Immanuel Kant. Professor Hundert examines the sources and strategies of Mandeville's science of human nature and the role of his ideas in shaping eighteenth century economic, social and moral theories.

Reviews

‘Whenever anyone speaks, without bitterness … of man as a belly with two needs and a head with one; when ever anyone sees, seeks and wants to see only hunger, sexual desire, and vanity, as though these were the actual and sole motives of human actions; in brief, whenever anyone speaks ‘badly’ of man - but does not speak ill of him - the lover of knowledge should listen carefully and with diligence.’

Source: Beyond Good and Evil

‘Though words be the signs we have of another’s opinions and intentions; yet, because of the equivocation of them is so frequent according to the diversity of contexture, and the company wherewith they go (which the presence of him that speaketh, our sight of his actions and conjecture of his intentions, must help to discharge us of): It must be extremely hard to find out the opinions and meanings of those men that are gone from us long ago, and have left us no other signification thereof but their books; which cannot possibly be undertook without history enough to discover those aforementioned circumstances, and also without great prudence to observe them.

Source: Human Nature

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