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Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction
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  • Cited by 11
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Doyle, Thomas E. 2010. Kantian nonideal theory and nuclear proliferation. International Theory, Vol. 2, Issue. 01, p. 87.

    Harbour, Frances V. 2012. Teaching International Ethics: 1985 and Today. International Studies Perspectives, Vol. 13, Issue. 1, p. 16.

    PRESS, DARYL G. SAGAN, SCOTT D. and VALENTINO, BENJAMIN A. 2013. Atomic Aversion: Experimental Evidence on Taboos, Traditions, and the Non-Use of Nuclear Weapons. American Political Science Review, Vol. 107, Issue. 01, p. 188.

    Sechser, Todd S. and Fuhrmann, Matthew 2013. Crisis Bargaining and Nuclear Blackmail. International Organization, Vol. 67, Issue. 01, p. 173.

    Gurcan, Metin 2013. Drone warfare and contemporary strategy making: Does the tail wag the dog?. Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict, Vol. 6, Issue. 1-3, p. 153.

    Kosal, Margaret E. 2014. A New Role for Public Health in Bioterrorism Deterrence. Frontiers in Public Health, Vol. 2, Issue. ,

    Barbieri, William A. 2015. Constitutive Justice. p. 192.

    Harrington, Anne I. 2016. Power, violence, and nuclear weapons. Critical Studies on Security, Vol. 4, Issue. 1, p. 91.

    Simonen, Katariina 2017. Chemical weapons, Ayatollah Khomeini and Islamic law. Global Security: Health, Science and Policy, Vol. 2, Issue. 1, p. 29.

    Reiner, J. Toby 2017. ‘Supreme Emergencies’, ontological holism, and rights to communal membership. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, Vol. 20, Issue. 4, p. 425.

    Khalil, Mohammad Hassan 2017. Jihad, Radicalism, and the New Atheism.

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    Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction
    • Online ISBN: 9780511606861
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511606861
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Book description

This volume, first published in 2004, offers an interesting perspective on the discussion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by broadening the terms of the debate to include both secular and religious investigations not normally considered. The volume contains a structured dialogue between representatives of the following ethical traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, feminism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, liberalism, natural law, pacifism, and realism. There are two introductory chapters on the technical aspects of WMD and international agreements for controlling WMD. A concluding essay compares the different ethical traditions. All the authors address the same set of moral issues and this creates a dialogue both within and across traditions. The debate structure is particularly useful and appealing for pedagogical purposes. The introductory essays on the technical and legal aspects of WMD could easily be used to introduce the subject to students.

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