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Hamlet versus Lear
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  • Cited by 6
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Steffan Davies, 2013. ‘VERGANGENHEITSBEWÄLTIGUNG’ AND MEMORY CONTESTS IN DÖBLIN'S <em>HAMLET</em>. The Modern Language Review, Vol. 108, Issue. 3, p. 898.


    Bruce, Susan 2007. Teaching Shakespeare and Early Modern Dramatists.


    Foakes, R. A. 2006. Performance Theory and Textual Theory: A Retort Courteous. Shakespeare, Vol. 2, Issue. 1, p. 47.


    Shaughnessy, Robert 2002. The Shakespeare Effect.


    Pechter, Edward 1997. Making love to our employment; or, the immateriality of arguments about the materiality of the Shakespearean text. Textual Practice, Vol. 11, Issue. 1, p. 51.


    Holderness, Graham Loughrey, Bryan and Murphy, Andrew 1995. ‘What's the matter?’ Shakespeare and textual theory. Textual Practice, Vol. 9, Issue. 1, p. 93.


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    Hamlet versus Lear
    • Online ISBN: 9780511518867
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511518867
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Book description

This book focuses on the two plays of Shakespeare that have generally contended for the title of 'greatest' among his works. Hamlet remained a focal point of reference until about 1960, when it was displaced by King Lear, a play which at the same time ceased to be perceived as a play of redemption and became a play of despair. Foakes attempts to explain these shifts by analysing the reception of the plays since about 1800, an analysis which necessarily engages with the politics of the plays and the politics of criticism. Recent critical theorising has destabilised the texts and undermined the notion of 'greatness' or any consideration of the plays as works of art. Foakes takes issue with such theories and reconsiders textual revisions, in order to argue for the integrity of the plays as reading texts, and to recover a flexible sense of their artistry in relation to meaning. The book will be of interest to scholars and students of Shakespeare and to theatre-goers.

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