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Ideology in America
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  • Cited by 91
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Mason, Lilliana and Wronski, Julie 2018. One Tribe to Bind Them All: How Our Social Group Attachments Strengthen Partisanship. Political Psychology, Vol. 39, Issue. , p. 257.

    Federico, Christopher M. and Malka, Ariel 2018. The Contingent, Contextual Nature of the Relationship Between Needs for Security and Certainty and Political Preferences: Evidence and Implications. Political Psychology, Vol. 39, Issue. , p. 3.

    Alvarez, Mauricio J. and Kemmelmeier, Markus 2018. Free speech as a cultural value in the United States. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, p. 707.

    Petrow, Gregory A. Transue, John E. and Vercellotti, Timothy 2018. Do White In-group Processes Matter, Too? White Racial Identity and Support for Black Political Candidates. Political Behavior, Vol. 40, Issue. 1, p. 197.

    Espinoza, Michael 2018. Trump and the GOP: A Marriage of Convenience?. Political Insight, Vol. 9, Issue. 4, p. 22.

    Sides, John Tesler, Michael and Vavreck, Lynn 2018. Hunting where the ducks are: activating support for Donald Trump in the 2016 Republican primary. Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties, Vol. 28, Issue. 2, p. 135.

    Settle, Jaime E. 2018. Frenemies.

    Davis, Nicholas T. 2018. Religion and Partisan-Ideological Sorting, 1984-2016*. Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 99, Issue. 4, p. 1446.

    Davis, Nicholas T. 2018. Perceptions of elites and (asymmetric) sorting. Research & Politics, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, p. 205316801877709.

    Chong, Dennis and Mullinix, Kevin J. 2018. Information and Issue Constraints on Party Cues. American Politics Research, p. 1532673X1880388.

    Collins, Timothy P. 2018. Hypocrisy in American Political Attitudes. p. 159.

    Ensley, Michael J 2018. Donald R. Kinder and Nathan P. Kalmoe. Neither Liberal nor Conservative: Ideological Innocence in the American Public. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2017. 224 pp. $78.00 (cloth). $26.00 (paper). Public Opinion Quarterly, Vol. 82, Issue. 1, p. 205.

    Mieriņa, Inta 2018. Understanding Youth Participation Across Europe. p. 37.

    Federico, Christopher M. and Ekstrom, Pierce D. 2018. The Political Self: How Identity Aligns Preferences With Epistemic Needs. Psychological Science, Vol. 29, Issue. 6, p. 901.

    Park, Barum 2018. How Are We Apart? Continuity and Change in the Structure of Ideological Disagreement in the American Public, 1980–2012. Social Forces, Vol. 96, Issue. 4, p. 1757.

    Donovan, Kathleen M. and Klahm, Charles F. 2018. How Priming Innocence Influences Public Opinion on Police Misconduct and False Convictions. Criminal Justice Review, Vol. 43, Issue. 2, p. 174.

    Ramirez, Mark D. and Lewis, Paul G. 2018. Beliefs About Corporate America and the Structure of Opinions Toward Privatization. Political Behavior, Vol. 40, Issue. 4, p. 1011.

    Carroll, Royce and Kubo, Hiroki 2018. Polarization and ideological congruence between parties and supporters in Europe. Public Choice, Vol. 176, Issue. 1-2, p. 247.

    Sances, Michael W. 2018. Ideology and Vote Choice in U.S. Mayoral Elections: Evidence from Facebook Surveys. Political Behavior, Vol. 40, Issue. 3, p. 737.

    Miler, Kristina C. 2018. Poor Representation.

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Book description

Public opinion in the United States contains a paradox. The American public is symbolically conservative: it cherishes the symbols of conservatism and is more likely to identify as conservative than as liberal. Yet at the same time, it is operationally liberal, wanting government to do and spend more to solve a variety of social problems. This book focuses on understanding this contradiction. It argues that both facets of public opinion are real and lasting, not artifacts of the survey context or isolated to particular points in time. By exploring the ideological attitudes of the American public as a whole, and the seemingly conflicted choices of individual citizens, it explains the foundations of this paradox. The keys to understanding this large-scale contradiction, and to thinking about its consequences, are found in Americans' attitudes with respect to religion and culture and in the frames in which elite actors describe policy issues.

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