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Inside Lawyers' Ethics
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  • Cited by 15
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Newman, Daniel Carl 2018. Are lawyers neurotic?. International Journal of the Legal Profession, Vol. 25, Issue. 1, p. 3.

    Cominelli, Luigi 2015. Avvocati in trasformazione. note brevi su organizzazione e deontologia. SOCIOLOGIA DEL DIRITTO, p. 171.

    Kazun, Anton Pavlovich 2015. Russian Lawyers. Sociological Research, Vol. 54, Issue. 6, p. 419.

    Hyams, Ross Brown, Grace and Foster, Richard 2013. The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, Vol. 33, Issue. 2, p. 159.

    Spencer, Rachel 2012. Legal Ethics and the Media: Are the Ethics of Lawyers and Journalists Irretrievably at Odds?. Legal Ethics, Vol. 15, Issue. 1, p. 83.

    Mason, Jim 2012. How Might the Adversarial Imperative be Effectively Tempered in Mediation?. Legal Ethics, Vol. 15, Issue. 1, p. 111.

    Hyams, Ross 2012. Multidisciplinary Clinical Legal Education. Alternative Law Journal, Vol. 37, Issue. 2, p. 103.

    Haller, Linda 2012. Australian Discipline: The Story of Issac Brott. Legal Ethics, Vol. 15, Issue. 2, p. 197.

    Masson, Judith 2012. ‘I think I do have strategies’: lawyers' approaches to parent engagement in care proceedings. Child & Family Social Work, Vol. 17, Issue. 2, p. 202.

    Stewart, Pam and Evers, Maxine 2010. The Requirement that Lawyers Certify Reasonable Prospects of Success: Must 21st Century Lawyers Boldly Go where No Lawyer has Gone Before?. Legal Ethics, Vol. 13, Issue. 1, p. 1.

    Barry, Brock E. and Ohland, Matthew W. 2009. Applied Ethics in the Engineering, Health, Business, and Law Professions: A Comparison. Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 98, Issue. 4, p. 377.

    Evans, Adrian and Hyams, Ross 2008. Independent Evaluations of Clinical Legal Education Programs. Griffith Law Review, Vol. 17, Issue. 1, p. 52.

    Hall, Kath and Holmes, Vivien 2008. The Power of Rationalisation to Influence Lawyers' Decisions to Act Unethically. Legal Ethics, Vol. 11, Issue. 2, p. 137.

    Palermo, Josephine and Evans, Adrian 2008. Almost There. Griffith Law Review, Vol. 17, Issue. 1, p. 252.

    Economides, Kim 2007. Anglo‐American conceptions of professional responsibility and the reform of Japanese legal education: Creating a virtuous circle?. The Law Teacher, Vol. 41, Issue. 2, p. 155.

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Book description

Legal ethics is often described as an oxymoron or contradiction in terms - lay people find the concept amusing and lawyers can find ethics impossible. The best lawyers are those who have come to grips with their own values and actively seek to improve their ethical practise. This book is designed to help law students and new lawyers understand and modify their own ethical priorities, not just because this knowledge makes it easier to practise law and earn an income, but because self-aware, ethical legal practice is right and feels better than anything else. Packed with case studies of ethical scandals and dilemmas from real life legal practice in Australia, each chapter delves into the most difficult issues lawyers face. From lawyers' part in corporate fraud to the ethics of time-based billing, Parker and Evans expose the values that underlie current practice and set out the alternatives ethical lawyers might follow.

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