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Ireland, 1912–1985
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  • Cited by 17
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Drudy, Sheelagh 1991. Developments in the Sociology of Education in Ireland 1966–1991. Irish Journal of Sociology, Vol. 1, Issue. 1, p. 107.

    Taylor, Jim and Johnes, Jill 1992. The Citation Record ofRegional Studiesand Related Journals, 1980–89. Regional Studies, Vol. 26, Issue. 1, p. 93.

    Finnane, Mark 1997. A decline in violence in Ireland ? Crime, policing and social relations, 1860-19141. Crime, Histoire & Sociétés, Vol. 1, Issue. 1, p. 51.

    O'Leary, Eoin 1999. Regional Income Estimates for Ireland, 1995. Regional Studies, Vol. 33, Issue. 9, p. 805.

    Cull, Nicholas J. 2000. Introduction. Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Vol. 20, Issue. 3, p. 277.

    Breathnach, C. S. and Moynihan, J. B. 2004. Who killed Koch’s bacillus?. Irish Journal of Medical Science, Vol. 173, Issue. 3, p. 166.

    Fanning, Bryan and Mutwarasibo, Fidele 2007. Nationals/non-nationals: immigration, citizenship and politics in the Republic of Ireland. Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 30, Issue. 3, p. 439.

    Keane, Elizabeth 2007. All Politics is Local. Irish Studies Review, Vol. 15, Issue. 3, p. 295.

    Dolan, Paddy and Connolly, John 2009. The civilizing of hurling in Ireland. Sport in Society, Vol. 12, Issue. 2, p. 196.

    Laverty, David and Garnham, Neal 2010. Football in Inter-war Northern Ireland: Ballymena Football and Athletic Club Limited – Religious and Political Exclusivity or Civic Inclusivity?. The International Journal of the History of Sport, Vol. 27, Issue. 13, p. 2212.

    Jordan, Tony and Butler, Shane 2011. The globalization of addiction: A study in the poverty of spirit. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, Vol. 18, Issue. 4, p. 270.

    Drea, Eoin 2016. The role of T.A. Smiddy in Fianna Fáil economic policy-making 1932–45. Irish Studies Review, Vol. 24, Issue. 2, p. 175.

    MacFeely, Steve 2016. Opportunism over strategy: a history of regional policy and spatial planning in Ireland. International Planning Studies, Vol. 21, Issue. 4, p. 377.

    O’Donnell, James T. 2017. Content, Comment and Censorship. Media History, Vol. 23, Issue. 3-4, p. 345.

    O’Malley, Eoin and Murphy, Gary 2017. The leadership difference? Context and choice in Fianna Fáil’s party leadership. Irish Political Studies, Vol. 32, Issue. 1, p. 118.

    O’Flaherty, Joanne and Gleeson, Jim 2017. Irish student teachers’ levels of moral reasoning: context, comparisons, and contributing influences. Teachers and Teaching, Vol. 23, Issue. 1, p. 59.

    O’Flaherty, J. McCormack, O. Gleeson, J. O’Reilly, B. O’Grady, E. and Kenny, N. 2018. Developing the characteristic spirit of publicly managed schools in a more secular and pluralist Ireland. Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 48, Issue. 3, p. 317.

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    Ireland, 1912–1985
    • Online ISBN: 9781139167802
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139167802
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Book description

Ireland, 1912–1985 is the first study on this scale of Irish performance, North and South, in the twentieth century. Although stressing the primacy of politics in Irish public affairs, it argues that Irish politics must be understood in the broad context of economic, social, administrative, cultural and intellectual history. The book also explores fully the relationship between rhetoric and reality in the Irish mind, and sees political behaviour largely as a product of collective psychology. The 'Irish experience' is placed firmly in a comparative context. Therefore the book seeks to assess the relative importance of British influence and of indigenous impulses in shaping an independent Ireland, and to identify the relationship between personality and process in determining Irish history. Particularly close attention is paid to the role of individuals such as Eamon de Valera, Michael Collins, W. T. Cosgrove, Sir James Craig, J. J. McElligott, Sean Lemass, Terence O'Neill, and Ian Paisley, and to the limits within which even the most powerful personalities were forced to operate. This is by any standards a massive analytical study, of the first importance, which will become required reading by all who wish to deepen their understanding of the nature of modern Irish history and the way it has been shaped by the collective and individual personality.

Reviews

‘ … one of the great books of our time … proves once again that Ireland is a fascinating country since it has given birth to such a fascinating book.’

Owen Dudley Edwards Source: New Statesman and Society

‘ … a quite remarkable achievement … Some prospective readers may shrink from so big a book. They should not do so, for its pace is even more impressive than its size. (Lee) is concerned not merely with describing the Irish past but, much more, with prescribing for the Irish present and for the Irish future.’

Ronan Fanning Source: Sunday Independent

'While its a massive analytical study, Lee has also written with wit, and it is a must for anyone wanting to expand their knowledge of modern Irish history. Lee's sceptical eye is matched with great verve and insight. '

Source: Irish Examiner

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