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Language in the British Isles
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    SCHLEEF, ERIK and TURTON, DANIELLE 2018. Sociophonetic variation of like in British dialects: effects of function, context and predictability. English Language and Linguistics, Vol. 22, Issue. 01, p. 35.

    Snell, Julia and Andrews, Richard 2017. To what extent does a regional dialect and accent impact on the development of reading and writing skills?. Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 47, Issue. 3, p. 297.

    Wilson, Gary N. Johnson, Henry and Sallabank, Julia 2015. ‘I'm not dead yet': a comparative study of indigenous language revitalization in the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey. Current Issues in Language Planning, Vol. 16, Issue. 3, p. 259.

    Nevitt, Drew 2015. Language contact in Shetland Scots and Southern Irish English. English Today, Vol. 31, Issue. 01, p. 43.

    2014. A Companion to British Literature. p. 418.

    Zacher, Samantha 2014. A Companion to British Literature. p. xxxi.

    Sturiale, Massimo 2012. No Bot’le No Party: T-Glottaling and Pronouncing Dictionaries. Language & History, Vol. 55, Issue. 1, p. 63.

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    Language in the British Isles
    • Online ISBN: 9780511620782
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511620782
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Book description

The British Isles are home to a vast range of different spoken and signed languages and dialects. Language continues to evolve rapidly, in its diversity, in the number and the backgrounds of its speakers, and in the repercussions it has had for political and educational affairs. This book provides a comprehensive survey of the dominant languages and dialects used in the British Isles. Topics covered include the history of English; the relationship between Standard and Non-Standard Englishes; the major non-standard varieties spoken on the islands; and the history of multilingualism; and the educational and planning implications of linguistic diversity in the British Isles. Among the many dialects and languages surveyed by the volume are British Black English, Celtic languages, Chinese, Indian, European migrant languages, British Sign Language, and Anglo-Romani. Clear and accessible in its approach, it will be welcomed by students in sociolinguistics, English language, and dialectology, as well as anyone interested more generally in language within British society.

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