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Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence
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  • Cited by 341
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Uzdensky, D A 2018. Relativistic turbulence with strong synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton cooling. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 477, Issue. 3, p. 2849.

    Mahajan, Swadesh and Lingam, Manasvi 2018. Relativistic-amplitude electromagnetic waves—Beating the “magnetic” barrier. Physics of Plasmas, Vol. 25, Issue. 7, p. 072112.

    de Andrade, L. C. Garcia 2018. Metric-torsion decay of non-adiabatic chiral helical magnetic fields against chiral dynamo action in bouncing cosmological models. The European Physical Journal C, Vol. 78, Issue. 6,

    Sahoo, Ganapati and Biferale, Luca 2018. Energy cascade and intermittency in helically decomposed Navier–Stokes equations. Fluid Dynamics Research, Vol. 50, Issue. 1, p. 011420.

    Miloshevich, George Morrison, Philip J. and Tassi, Emanuele 2018. Direction of cascades in a magnetofluid model with electron skin depth and ion sound Larmor radius scales. Physics of Plasmas, Vol. 25, Issue. 7, p. 072303.

    Shoda, Munehito and Yokoyama, Takaaki 2018. Anisotropic Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence Driven by Parametric Decay Instability: The Onset of Phase Mixing and Alfvén Wave Turbulence. The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 859, Issue. 2, p. L17.

    von Kusserow, Ulrich 2018. Chaos, Turbulenzen und kosmische Selbstorganisationsprozesse. p. 153.

    Gürcan, Ö. D. 2018. Nested polyhedra model of isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Physical Review E, Vol. 97, Issue. 6,

    Jurčišinová, Eva Jurčišin, Marián Remecky, Richard Adam, Gh. Buša, J. Hnatič, M. and Podgainy, D. 2018. Diffusion Processes in the A-Model of Vector Admixture: Turbulent Prandtl Number. EPJ Web of Conferences, Vol. 173, Issue. , p. 02009.

    Mamatsashvili, G Stefani, F Guseva, A and Avila, M 2018. Quasi-two-dimensional nonlinear evolution of helical magnetorotational instability in a magnetized Taylor–Couette flow. New Journal of Physics, Vol. 20, Issue. 1, p. 013012.

    Sagaut, Pierre and Cambon, Claude 2018. Homogeneous Turbulence Dynamics. p. 583.

    Kamada, Kohei Tsai, Yuhsin and Vachaspati, Tanmay 2018. Magnetic field transfer from a hidden sector. Physical Review D, Vol. 98, Issue. 4,

    Briard, Antoine and Gomez, Thomas 2018. The decay of isotropic magnetohydrodynamics turbulence and the effects of cross-helicity. Journal of Plasma Physics, Vol. 84, Issue. 01,

    Nisticò, G. Vladimirov, V. Nakariakov, V. M. Battams, K. and Bothmer, V. 2018. Oscillations of cometary tails: a vortex shedding phenomenon?. Astronomy & Astrophysics, Vol. 615, Issue. , p. A143.

    Narita, Yasuhito 2018. Space–time structure and wavevector anisotropy in space plasma turbulence. Living Reviews in Solar Physics, Vol. 15, Issue. 1,

    Bonde, R. E. F. Lopez, R. E. and Wang, J. Y. 2018. The Effect of IMF Fluctuations on the Subsolar Magnetopause Position: A Study Using a Global MHD Model. Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, Vol. 123, Issue. 4, p. 2598.

    Zhdankin, Vladimir Uzdensky, Dmitri A Werner, Gregory R and Begelman, Mitchell C 2018. Numerical investigation of kinetic turbulence in relativistic pair plasmas – I. Turbulence statistics. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 474, Issue. 2, p. 2514.

    Kivotides, Demosthenes 2018. Interactions between vortex tubes and magnetic-flux rings at high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers. Physical Review Fluids, Vol. 3, Issue. 3,

    Jafari, Amir Vishniac, Ethan T. Kowal, Grzegorz and Lazarian, Alex 2018. Stochastic Reconnection for Large Magnetic Prandtl Numbers. The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 860, Issue. 1, p. 52.

    Comisso, L. Huang, Y.-M. Lingam, M. Hirvijoki, E. and Bhattacharjee, A. 2018. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Plasmoid-mediated Regime. The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 854, Issue. 2, p. 103.

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  • Dieter Biskamp, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany

Book description

This book presents an introduction to, and modern account of, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, an active field both in general turbulence theory and in various areas of astrophysics. The book starts by introducing the MHD equations, certain useful approximations and the transition to turbulence. The second part of the book covers incompressible MHD turbulence, the macroscopic aspects connected with the different self-organization processes, the phenomenology of the turbulence spectra, two-point closure theory, and intermittency. The third considers two-dimensional turbulence and compressible (in particular, supersonic) turbulence. Because of the similarities in the theoretical approach, these chapters start with a brief account of the corresponding methods developed in hydrodynamic turbulence. The final part of the book is devoted to astrophysical applications: turbulence in the solar wind, in accretion disks, and in the interstellar medium. This book is suitable for graduate students and researchers working in turbulence theory, plasma physics and astrophysics.

Reviews

‘… this new book by Biskamp presents hydromagnetic turbulence as a very accessible and highly interesting topic both for students and professionals … an ideal reference both for beginners and experts … This book should certainly belong to the compulsory literature of any graduate student working in hydromagnetic turbulence.’

Source: Journal of Fluid Mechanics

‘… recommended to anybody working in the field, including graduate students.’

Source: Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

'… I would recommend this book to all those who would like to undertake a serious study of MHD turbulence, be it from a theoretical point of view or because they are interested in applications.'

Source: Journal of Plasma Physics

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